Two children, 4 and 7, with mysterious polio-type disease reveal a devastating impact on the virus

The mother revealed the heartfelt words of her son after contracting a rare polio-type illness that can stop paralyzed forever.
Two years ago Sebastián Bottomley, seven, fell with a common cold. But he soon developed muscle weakness and eventually became completely paralyzed.
After conducting numerous tests, doctors in York, Pennsylvania, diagnosed acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an infection that causes sudden paralysis.
This year, at least 72 children in 22 states have been diagnosed with AFM and other 83 are being investigated.
Despite suffering more than 2,000 hours of physical and occupational therapy, Sebastian remains trapped in a wheelchair and can not walk, a situation that has frustrated and exhausted him.
"Sometimes, he says things like:" Mom, why can not I walk like all others not, without all this work? "Said her mother, Christa, to CBS News.

Two years ago, Sebastian Bottomley, seven (in the photo), from York, Pennsylvania, also had symptoms similar to a cold and was diagnosed with AFM

Camdyn Carr, four (in the photo), of Roanoke, Virginia, went down with a cold in August. In two weeks, he was paralyzed and diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM)

His words come as another mother of a child diagnosed with AFM reveals that his ordeal with the condition left him crying in the hospital bed.
Shortly after Sebastian began to crush August 2016, she began to show muscle weakness. Then, he could not move any part of the body below his neck.
After a battery of tests, the doctors finally diagnosed with AFM.
AFM is a rare but serious condition that affects the nervous system. Specifically it attacks the area of ​​the spinal cord called gray matter, which causes the muscles and reflexes of the body to weaken.
Symptoms often develop after a viral infection, such as enterovirus or West Nile virus, but there is often no clear cause.
Patients begin to have flu-like symptoms, including sneezing and cough. This slowly becomes the muscle weakness, the difficulty of moving the eyes and then the symptoms such as polio, including the facial fall and the difficulty to swallow them.
In rare cases, AFM can cause neurological complications that can lead to death.
Sebastian had to undergo numerous surgeries and was hospitalized more than 200 times in the last two years.
However, after 2,000 hours of physical and occupational therapy, Sebastian finally manages to dress, feed, get up and use the bathroom
"I can walk, I can move my arm and I would like it, kneel and I can drain on the floor from top to bottom," said Sebastian to WJZ13.

Sebastián underwent three surgeries and 2,000 hours of physical and occupational therapy. In portrait: Sebastián recovers the walk

Finally, get dressed, feed, get up and use the bathroom. However, he was confined to a wheelchair (left and right) from his diagnosis

After 2,000 hours of physical and occupational therapy, Sebastian finally manages to dress, feed, get up and use the bathroom
"He has been hospitalized nearly 200 days in the last two and a half years," Christa told the newspaper.
However, he still crawls in a wheelchair and re-learning to walk was a tough trip.
Camdyn Carr, four from Roanoake, Virginia, also felt frustrated by his slow progress that often leaves him crying in the hospital bed.
For Camdyn, it started as an infection of the common sine. However, just two weeks later, the entire right side of his body was paralyzed.
Only 24 hours later, he could not move or talk.
The doctors of the Health System of the University of Virginia informed the parents of Camdyn, Chris Carr and Brittany Hoff, who had AFM.
"There are no answers why you got it," said Hoff at WSET. "Doctors said that there is nothing we could avoid, there is nothing we could do."

Camdyn (before AFM, left and after AFM, on the right) can not breathe by himself and had an inserted trachilla. He is undergoing intense therapy but can not speak and he is only able to bite his fingers and fingers and move only one leg.

At least 72 children in 22 states have been diagnosed with AFM and other 83 are being investigated. In portrait: Camdyn no hospital

There is no specific treatment available for AFM and interventions are generally recommended on a case by case basis.
Children with weakness in the arms or legs may attend physical or occupational therapy.
However, doctors admit that they do not know the long-term results for those with AFM.
Currently, Camdyn is at the Kennedy Kreiger Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, where he is experiencing intense physical therapy and is expected to remain there until December 18.
& # 39;[Doctors] He said he will never recover. For the rest of his life – paralyzed, "said Hoff.
Currently, he is unable to speak and only manages to bite his fingers and fingers and move only one leg.
"It seems ok sometimes, but there are many times where you are crying," said Chris Carr at the WSET. "And I know it's because you can not talk."
The Camdyn family has set up a GoFundMe page to help cover expenses once you go home. So far, more than $ 3,200 of an initial target of $ 3,000.

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