Inside the remote Arctic city where the inhabitants wear whales of whales like canes

Walking through a dirt track in the remote Arab city of Qaanaaq, in the northwest of Greenland, passed a man with a bag full of blubber whipped whale.

He tells me that it is really the leaching of a narwhal. This is one of the rarest whales in the ocean, distinguished by a large fang that stands out from its head that has earned the surname of the "unicorn of the sea."

While they are extremely illusory creatures, in the waters surrounding Qaanaaq there is a rich source of narwhal and is a source of primordial food for the Inuit community, which is quite self-sufficient. Everywhere I saw the evidence of its role and the next man that touched me has a cane made of a narwhal fang.

A view of the bay in front of Qaanaaq with small icebergs that covered the waters

A view of the bay in front of Qaanaaq with small icebergs that covered the waters

A view of the bay in front of Qaanaaq with small icebergs that covered the waters

A resident of Qaanaaq shows his enormous narwhal fang

A resident of Qaanaaq shows his enormous narwhal fang

A local sports car features a cane formed by a narwhal fang

A local sports car features a cane formed by a narwhal fang

A resident of Qaanaaq shows his giant narwhal tusk (left), while another place features a cane formed by a (right)

A male narwhal that feeds on bait fish. This whale was nicknamed "the unicorn of the seas"

A male narwhal that feeds on bait fish. This whale was nicknamed "the unicorn of the seas"

A male narwhal that feeds on bait fish. This whale was nicknamed "the unicorn of the seas"

Another place I see shows that the narwhal intestines dry in their washing line.

Dry guts are often used to make clothes, because the resistant material is waterproof, which makes it perfect for the harsh environment.

As I walk away, he nipples inside his wooden porch and proudly returns with a giant narwhal fang well over 6 feet in length.

In an expedition prior to the Arctic highway I tried some narwhal, which was traditionally prepared inuit with a portion of skin and cut skin of the carcass.

A local man and woman perform a traditional dance outside the small museum in Qaanaaq that uses stamping jackets that offer maximum protection in the cold

A local man and woman perform a traditional dance outside the small museum in Qaanaaq that uses stamping jackets that offer maximum protection in the cold

A local man and woman perform a traditional dance outside the small museum in Qaanaaq that uses stamping jackets that offer maximum protection in the cold

The remote city of Qaanaaq was established in the winter of 1953 when the United States expanded an air base in a nearby area and transferred the population to the force

The local delicacy, known as muktuk, was a bit difficult to swallow, with the pink and gray piece with an elastic-elastic texture.

Although it was not to my liking, the seals and whales are a must for those who live in the Arctic forests as it is a very rich source of vitamin C and oily fats.

Local residents use all the parts of each animal they hunt, like the next couple that we ran into with low scripts.

A local man and woman perform a traditional dance outside the small museum in Qaanaaq that wears jackets of stamps, which offer maximum protection in the cold.

The man also has a pair of polar bear pants, while the lady wears traditional kamik boots lined with the same skin.

Together with seals and whales, terrestrial mammals are also hunted with a level strengthened by the government of Greenland to ensure that the population remains floating in the light of climate change.

Pauline Kristiansen and Aleqatsiaq Peary are the ancestors of the American polar explorer Robert Peary

Pauline Kristiansen and Aleqatsiaq Peary are the ancestors of the American polar explorer Robert Peary

The city of Qaanaaq lodges around 620 inhabitants and is near the Canadian Arctic

The city of Qaanaaq lodges around 620 inhabitants and is near the Canadian Arctic

Pauline Kristiansen and Aleqatsiaq Peary are the ancestors of the American polar explorer Robert Peary (left). The city of Qaanaaq lodges around 620 residents (right) and is near the Canadian Arctic

The colorful blue church in Qaanaaq where a male choir is held and performs and performs ceremonies

Again, no piece of animal is wasted and I have been told that the small bone that the woman is dancing is, in fact, a bone in the bone of the penis.

The man who tells me that this is none other than Aleqatsiaq Peary, the great great boy of the American polar explorer Robert Peary, who claims he was the first person to reach the North Pole in 1909.

Peary and his companion of expedition, Matthew Henson, both children paternos with inuit women and the deceased professor of Harvard, Dr. Allen Counter, dedicated their career to track the lineage.

Aleqatsiaq's English is incredibly good. He told me he saw many movies growing up in an attempt to teach himself.

The 35-year-old smiley, who has a bad sense of humor, seems to be the city man. I see later in the church singing in the male voice choir and walking down the main street with her grandmother 83, Pauline, later.

Aleqatsiaq Peary singing in the male voice choir

Aleqatsiaq Peary singing in the male voice choir

Robert E. Peary stated that he was the first person to reach the North Pole in 1909

Robert E. Peary stated that he was the first person to reach the North Pole in 1909

Aleqatsiaq Peary singing in the male vocal choir (left), and his grandfather Robert E. Peary, portrayed in 1906 (right). The American polar explorer affirmed that he was the first person to arrive at the North Pole in 1909

The picturesque houses of Qaanaaq are highlighted in the middle of the great scene

The picturesque houses of Qaanaaq are highlighted in the middle of the great scene

The picturesque houses of Qaanaaq are highlighted in the middle of the great scene

The octogenarian is Peary's granddaughter and, like her grandson, has an infectious smile.

Aleqatsiaq, who lived for a long time on the continent of Denmark and also in South Greenland, says he would never leave the remote city of Qaanaaq – which was established in the winter of 1953 when the United States expanded an air base in a nearby area and transferred to force to population

The city, which welcomes 620 people, offers you everything you need, he said.

"Feel happy or the explorer Peary brought me here," he reflects. "I think this is especially when I eat local food. I love the fermented seal. We take the intestines and bury it in the ground for months before riding.

"I used to hunt a lot but now I have Parkinson so it makes it harder. That's why I love music and singing.

While I'm not sure if I could stomach local food in Qaanaaq, the atmosphere is more to my liking. The place breathes a calm calm that is beneath your skin.

When I take leave of the place, I make a pact to return a day, just to hear the amazing sound of the wonderful male voice choir.

  • MailOnline Travel traveled to Qaanaaq during a trip with the Hurtigruten expedition cruise company in its 17-day Midnight Sun exploration itinerary.

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