Cynthia Nixon thinks that if “Sex and the City” were made now it wouldn’t have an all white cast: “God forbid”

Reportedly, the actress and former New York government candidate Cynthia Nixon thinks that portions of “Sex and the City” would have been somewhat renewed if the show had been written in the present.

Nixon, who played Miranda Hobbes on the hit show, made remarks to IndieWire before the debut of his film “Stray Dolls” at the Tribeca Film Festival, according to their report released on Monday.

Following a question on the subject, the actress listed the breed and economic status among the differences that she would expect to see from a more recent theoretical production of the show.

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Following a question on the subject, Nixon, on the right, listed the breed and economic status among the differences that he would expect to see from a more recent theoretical production of the show.

Following a question on the subject, Nixon, on the right, listed the breed and economic status among the differences that he would expect to see from a more recent theoretical production of the show.
(Getty)

“Well, I certainly don’t think we would all have been white, God forbid,” he said at the store. “One of the most difficult things for me – even at that time was – is to look back and see how focused it was on money, right? And how, Steve, mine [character’s] husband, he was like the closest to a boy in the working class, you know? It doesn’t matter a woman of the working class, does it? “

Reportedly, Nixon also delved into how physical representations were represented on the show.

“I think we wouldn’t all look like this,” he said. “In similar terms, the factor of perfection. In terms of the always so incredible appearance. “

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But despite the changes he thinks would be made today, he told IndieWire that “Sex and the City” is “a feminist show”, although “it has many failures in the feminist movement.”

Cynthia Nixon: SATC has had many of the failures of the feminist movement

Sex and the City, Cynthia Nixon

HBO

Cynthia Nixon you think Sex and the City it’s a “feminist show”, but it also thinks it has “many of the failures of the feminist movement”.

The 53-year-old star who played Miranda Hobbes in the film SATC TV series and movies, about the series that catapulted her to stardom with co-stars Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall is Kristin Davis. In a new interview with Indiewire, Conducted before the premiere of his new film Stray dolls at the Tribeca Film Festival, Nixon reflects on the series, first presented on HBO in 1998, and how it would be different today.

“Well, I certainly don’t think we would all have been white, God forbid,” says Nixon at the outlet. “One of the most difficult things for me – it was even then – is looking back and seeing how focused he was on money, right? And how, Steve, my [character’s] husband, he was like the closest to a boy in the working class, you know? It doesn’t matter a woman of the working class, does it? “

The actress, activist and politician, who ran for the governor of New York in 2018, also addresses the idea of ​​perfection represented in the show.

“Also, I think we wouldn’t all look like this,” shares Nixon Indiewire. “In terms of likes, the factor of perfection. In terms of how amazing it always looks. And I know it’s the fantasy element, and in terms of the show it was important. But I think there are many ways people can be visually convincing without looking – quote unquote – perfect. “

Kristin Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon, Sex and the City

HBO

“There was so much debate when[[[[Sex and the City]it turned out whether it was a feminist show or not, which I always thought was stupid – obviously it’s a feminist show, “Nixon keeps saying to vent”. But I think it has many of the failures of the feminist movement within. In this she is like white women and with money struggling for their empowerment. In a little bubble. “

After six seasons, Sex and the City it aired its final episode in February 2004. The show went on the big screen with that of 2008 Sex and the City film, followed by that of 2010 Sex and the City 2. So while fans of the series were hoping for a Sex and the City 3plans for a third apparently failed movie.

Stray doll review: Cynthia Nixon steals an elegant immigrant thriller

Sticking a knife into the hard belly of the American dream, Sonejuhi Sinha’s debut draws fresh blood from a very familiar territory.

Riz (Geetanjali Thapa) is not naive. It may be fresh from the boat, but it is not as if it had never been on dry land before. He knew – at least to a certain extent – what life could have had when he left his family behind and illegally emigrated from India to move to New York state. He knew that sneaking in America meant starting from the ground floor, and he knew that some of the unpleasant people he had met over there could have tried to bring her back to the same petty crime life that had fled home to escape.

So when Riz washes up at the Tides Plaza Motel at the start of Sonejuhi Sinha’s confident and arresting debut film “Stray Dolls”, the stealthy teenager arrives with his guard and chin up, ready for the challenges that come with a lifetime honesty. Less than 10 minutes later, she is forced to enter a stranger’s room and steal a cocaine brick. For better or worse, foreigner or domestic, it is difficult to follow the law in a country where your very existence is considered illegal and a handshake with the devil may be required to keep any crumb of hope alive. Riz isn’t naive, but she may not be cynical enough to control her fate.

Sticking a knife into the hard belly of the American dream, “Stray Dolls” is a tense and elegant thriller that manages to draw fresh blood from a very familiar territory. Sinha may not be a pioneer of any new terrain in Riz’s story, but the specificity with which she tells it can make the film extraordinarily urgent. “Stray Dolls” tackles the Trump era with such a light touch that Sinha could have considered keeping the President entirely out, but Riz’s misfortunes are the direct result of a company that forces the most desperate people against each other. the other one.

Everyone in this film is somewhat desperate, but no one – not even Riz – is more conflicted about their choices than Una, the manager of Eastern Europe at the Low Tides Motel. Played by a ruthless but ruthless Cynthia Nixon, who offers that kind of supportive performance that could inspire even her most ardent political supporters to appreciate that she won’t be locked up in Albany for the next four years, Una has essentially turned the motel into a gigantic moral compromise.

On the one hand, it offers safe work to people who have nowhere else to go. One gives Riz a room in exchange for her maid services and calms the wary young immigrant by telling her about the motel’s weekly karaoke night. “You work hard, you make it here,” he says. And then, in a tone difficult to analyze: “Do you believe it?”

Feel that Una wants or wishes that she can still. And that sense does not waver in the following scene, when he takes Riz’s Indian passport and tears it to pieces, forcing the girl to an open future of identified servitude. But even the cheapest motels cost real money to run, and Una has already resigned herself to doing very bad things to buy a brighter tomorrow for her scum of a son (Robert Aramayo, who played the young Eddard Stark in ” Game of Thrones “). “I don’t work so hard to see you waste yourself!” she looks at him, bending all sorts of sins into her work.

Riz’s roommate is a little less patient in making things happen. A ramshackle blonde wild girl who was born alone and in trouble, Dallas (Olivia Dejonge, channeling Juno’s temple) is a natural opportunist who sees Riz as a perfect foil. A few seconds after the meeting, he brings the immigrant back to the same criminal life that Riz is trying to leave behind. It’s a big hit for a small film – a basic plot rhythm that might not seem natural in a split-story where all the actors are allowed to keep their acne – but “Stray Dolls” is happy to walk in line between social realism and seedy crime; the film, like its characters, is wedged between the eaves and the stars.

Sometimes, it looks like a Dardenne brothers movie that dreams of becoming “Spring Breakers”, and Sinha’s direction makes it easy to understand how Riz might get involved in the action. Between the gray surroundings of purgatory and the static images of Riz calling her parents to lie about the way America is treating her, it’s as if Sinha was encouraging her audience to ask for some excitement, and do the cheer for Riz when she gets immediately involved in the Dallas drug scheme.

It is very important that the two girls take care of each other. Nobody else does it for either of them. They could also be in love. A narrow ray of hope can be enough to make even the right people forget and – between a little ecstasy, a fresh tungsten lighting and a seductive soundtrack – it’s strange how quickly you start to feel that Riz could be on the right track . Thanks to Thapa’s determined determination of absorbent performance, you may even continue to feel that way after the bodies start piling around her.

If “Stray Dolls” puts a strain on the belief, this only happens because the plot begins to get in the way. Riz is primarily a reflection of her circumstances, but the story turns away from Una and Dallas even though they get deeper with each scene. Sinha has a certain ending in mind and, to get there, she has to introduce a gangster with firearms from the central casting; a real villain in a movie that’s otherwise full of sinners who do their best.

The more aggressively the plot of the story tries to steal a better life for themselves, the more “Stray Dolls” melts away from the question of the lives they lead now. One claims to have a big heart, but we never get to see how much it bleeds for other people; there is a real tragedy in the way his son and his employees come out with the empty promise that one day they could take control of the motel, but that dream goes away as Riz and Dallas head for a dead end. At least they do it together. For better or for worse, the lost souls of the Tides Plaza Motel see themselves as their only hope. The land of opportunity has nothing else to offer.

Grade: B

“Stray Dolls” premiered at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival. It is currently seeking distribution in the United States.

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Sex and the City had a white feminism problem, says Cynthia Nixon

“He has many failures of the feminist movement. He’s like white women with money fighting for empowerment,” said Nixon.

In his first round of interviews since he was nominated for the governor of New York last year, Cynthia Nixon has not been afraid of becoming a politician. Although she shot her new film before the campaign, the drama about human trafficking “Stray Dolls” is Nixon’s first acting project that has come out since she was defeated in primary by incumbent Andrew Cuomo. In an in-person interview before the Tribeca Film Festival premiere, Nixon was relieved to be able to speak freely.

“It’s nice to be questioned about things that are just my opinion, you can’t go wrong,” he said.

Leaning on that freedom, Nixon did not hold back when asked how she thought “Sex and the City”, the revolutionary HBO comedy that made her a household name, could be different if it were made today.

“Well, I certainly think we wouldn’t have all been white, God forbid,” he said. “One of the most difficult things for me – even at that time was – is to look back and see how focused it was on money, right? And how, Steve, mine [character’s] husband, he was like the closest to a boy in the working class, you know? It doesn’t matter a woman of the working class, does it? “

He will find no such excuse with “Stray Dolls”, in which Nixon plays an evil hotel manager who exploits his vulnerable clientele. It is the first feature film by Indian American director Sonejuhi Sinha, developed from a short film premiered in Cannes. Nixon sports a Polish killer accent in a counter-type role, and is the perfect film for the young protagonist of the film, a recent immigrant from India played by the imposing Geetanjali Thapa. It’s a fantastic part for a young black woman and Thapa is excellent in the role.

Looking back on “Sex and the City”, Nixon wished there were more nuances in the casting.

“Besides, I think we wouldn’t all look like this,” he said. “In similar terms, the factor of perfection. In terms of the always so incredible appearance. And I know it’s the fantasy element, and in terms of the show it was important. But I think there are many ways people can be visually irresistible without looking – quote a quote – perfect.

He sees that the failures of the show are commensurate with the failures of the traditional feminist movement, which activists and black women have criticized for prioritizing the needs of white and wealthy women over low-income women and black women.

“There have been many debates when [‘Sex and the City’] it turned out whether it was a feminist show or not, which I always thought was stupid – obviously it’s a feminist show. But I think there are many flaws in the feminist movement. In this she is like white women and with money struggling for their empowerment. In a little bubble. “

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Central Oregon Coast spring preview

Depoe Bay and Newport in May: Central Oregon Coast spring preview

Posted on 04/28/2019 at 15:53 ​​PDT
By the Oregon Coast Beach Connection staff

Depoe Bay and Newport in May: Central Oregon Coast spring preview

(Newport, Oregon) – Speed ​​may increase as spring plummets into summer and the great Memorial Day weekend, and the two central Oregon coast towns of Newport and Depoe Bay know how to scream. The art scene is at the center of much of the fun as productions of classical and theatrical music abound, which includes a special tribute to the star of David Ogden Stiers of M * A * S * H.

So much to do on the central Oregon coast this month and until June.

2nd – 5th May. Newport Loyalty Days & Sea Fair. A variety of events throughout central Oregon’s coastal city, including a Saturday parade. Newport, Oregon. (541) 574-7802.

May 5. Reading of the Oregon Book Award winners. Literary Arts is pleased to present three of this year’s Oregon Book Awards winners in Newport in May as part of the Oregon Book Awards authors’ tour. With the Oregon Book Award winners Apricot Irving, Beth Wood, Leni Zumas. 2:00 pm Newport Public Library. 35 NW Nye St. Newport, Oregon. Website

May 8. Science on Tap: The International Gulf of Alaska Expedition: Using a Russian research ship to study salmon on the high seas. The international Gulf of Alaska expedition spent a month this winter in the Gulf of Alaska studying salmon on board the Russian research vessel Professor Kaganovskiy. This expedition is the signing event for the International Year of Salmon. 5:15 pm Rogue Brewery: South Beach. 2320 SE Marine Science Dr. Newport, Oregon.

May 10-12. Kidstuff. TJ Hoofers Inc. / Dance! And all that jazz! Annual Mother’s Day celebration and fundraising for TJ Hoofers, Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving dance education for students in Lincoln County. Over 150 Dance Dance Students! And all that jazz! fill Silverman’s stage with a variety of styles, including Jazz, Tap, Ballet, Hip Hop, creatives for 3-5 year olds and musical comedies. Adults: $ 12 and students: $ 10. 19:00 (14:00 on May 12). Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org

May 11th. Met Opera: Dialogues Des Carmelites. Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer’s musical director Yannick Nézet-Séguin is leading an established ensemble in Poulenc’s devastating modern masterpiece of faith and martyrdom, “Dialogues des Carmélites”, Saturday 9 May, hosted by W. W. Clyde Reid. 9:00 Single ticket prices are $ 21 general, $ 18 senior and $ 10 students; seating for general admission. Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org

May 15. One Night Delights: True West, presented by: Red Octopus Theater Company. Drunken Caramel Bread Pudding is a staging of Sam Shepard’s classic American comedy “True West”, directed by Ron Miller and presented by the Red Octopus Theater Company as part of the OCCA’s series of theater performances “One Night Delights”. Duel bread pudding with whipped cream and drunken caramel provided by Zach’s Bistro. 7pm $ 15 plus tax. Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org

May 18. Alexander Tutunov piano recital. Widely recognized as one of the most outstanding virtuosos of the former Soviet Union. $ 30. 3:00 pm The youth house in Little Whale Cove. Depoe Bay, Oregon. SiletzBayMusic.org.

May 18-19. The Newport Symphony Orchestra at the Ocean directed by Adam Flatt, he performs the Copland Fanfare for the common man, the Ciajkovskij suite from Swan Lake and the world premiere of a new work commissioned by the NGO in honor of David Ogden Stiers. Stiers, veteran actor and protagonist of M * A * S * H ​​in the 70s, lived in Newport until his passing a few years ago. He was very active in the Newport music and art scene. There will be a pre-concert speech with Maestro Flatt and Mark Fish at 6.45pm, only on Saturday evening. Join the NSO musicians and the conductor after the concert for a reception hosted by the Flying Dutchman Winery. $ 25 and $ 39 plus ticket fees; students $ 10. 19:30 (14:00 on May 19). Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org

May 24 – June 2. Pinocchia, presented by Pacific Dance Ensemble / Newport School of Artistic Movement. Adults – $ 15 (plus online commissions). Students / Seniors – $ 10 (plus online fees). 19:00 (14:00 on Sunday). Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org.

May 27. 74th ceremony of the Commemoration of the Fleet of Flowers. Pay tribute to those who are lost at sea as you watch the flowery fishing fleet sailing to the sea. Immediately following reception. 11:00 AM Depoe Bay, Oregon. DepoeBayChamber.com.

June 15. Try Grieg and Scriabin. Seattle pianist James E. Thompson will bring his artistic talent to the Performing Arts Center with his concert “Tryst with Grieg & Scriabin” on the occasion of Edvard Grieg’s birthday. Thompson will fascinate you with the shades and shades of Grieg’s “lyrical pieces” and will touch your heart with the mystical creativity of Alexander Scriabin.Newport Performing Arts Center. 777 W. Olive Street. Newport, Oregon. 541-265-ARTS (2787). coastarts.org. Accommodations in Newport – Where to eat – Maps – Virtual tours



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“Dear Evan Hansen” shows teenage grief in the social media era

Each generation has its own set of anxieties and tribulations, all urgently cataloged by the pop music writers of the time. “Dear Evan Hansen” is one of the first Broadway musicals to delve into the loneliness and despair of the digital age and the tribute it may demand of teenagers and their parents who are sometimes absent and wavering.

“Dear Evan” – a story of suicide, emotional chaos, young love and storm on social media that occurs when a letter falls into the wrong hands – arrived at Fox Theater this week for its first run in Atlanta, broken hearts, nerves thunderous and spreading his admonition story with an urgent sound.

With the participation of benevolent Ben Levi Ross as a tortured soul Evan and with the wonderfully articulated songs of Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, the show that wiped out the 2017 Tonys, winning six, is one of the hottest tickets of the Atlanta theater season . For the most part, it doesn’t disappoint.

To reveal too much of the plot means to risk ruining everything. Sharing too little means confusing the material and confusing the reader. Proceed with caution.

At first we see that Evan has difficulty coping with the social mechanisms of life and high school. His therapist advised him to write epistles for himself, emphasizing the positive nature of everyday events. When Evan takes a sad note of his feelings of invisibility and his love for Zoe (Maggie McKenna), he falls into the hands of Zoe’s addictive and bad-tempered brother, Connor (Marrick Smith) of short duration.

The next thing you know, Zoe and Connor’s parents, Larry and Cynthia Murphy (Aaron Lazar and Christiane Noll), attacked Evan for clues to Connor’s suicide, as it would appear from the “Dear Evan Hansen” letter that Evan and Connor they were the best of friends, if not more.

While Evan could have lifted the Murphys out of their desperate and misplaced fantasy, he plays together and one mastery leads to another.

->

Classmate Snarky Jared (Jared Goldsmith) is recruited as an accomplice to Evan. Alana (Phoebe Koyabe), an egocentric classmate looking for a cause, suddenly finds one in the powerful tale of Evan and Connor. And a campaign on social media to raise awareness of teenage suicide and rehabilitate an apple orchard where friends are supposed to be hanging around illuminating the Internet.

When Evan’s little lie becomes big and viral, he is suddenly getting the end of the kindness, love and worship that previously eluded him.

Suffice it to say that things don’t end happy. Or them?

In Evan, the Murphys find a surrogate son. In the Murphys, Evan, who had been abandoned by his father when he was young and was unwittingly overlooked by his sweet and hardworking mother, Heidi (Jessica Phillips), finds the support and nourishment he craves. And Alana, who helps understand the unconscious digital blitz that is based on a fiction, gets a reason for being.

My problem with Steven Levenson’s book (the details of which are now overloaded) is that it puts a strain on the limits of common sense. There are too many holes in Evan’s story, red flags all over the place, but the characters apparently don’t want to see the truth.

The positive side is the suspense to bite. There is comedy in the form of embarrassing, aggressive and crafty teenagers. There is a slow, steaming flame in Evan and Zoe’s strange, morbid courtship. (By the way, McKenna is surprisingly good as a wise young woman beyond her years. Her Zoe is intelligent, practical and probably the freest member of the group.)

And there is a masterful design, in the form of video projections (by Peter Nigrini) that describe the frenzy of social media that guides the action. (The sets are by David Korins, costumes by Emily Rebholz, lights by Japhy Weideman, sounds by Nevin Steinberg.)

But deep down, “Dear Evan Hansen” is a profound and devastating display of terror at work in the soul of dear Evan Hansen. A shattered scarecrow of a child is sucked into a private tragedy not of his own creation, only to find that he is so ill-equipped to handle the situation that invents another type of crisis and very public.

In the end, this difficult and provocative musical becomes a lesson in love, redemption and forgiveness, although the path to healing is full of pain. “Dear Evan Hansen” has the ability to tear you apart and somehow make you grateful for the bruises. It will take your breath away. No lie.

REVIEW OF THE THEATER

“Dear Evan Hansen”

20:00 April 26 and April 27. 14:00 April 27. 13:00 and 18:30 April 28th. Until April 28. $ 59- $ 249. Very few tickets left. Broadway to Atlanta, Fox Theater, 660 Peachtree St., Atlanta; 855-285-8499; foxtheatre.org

Bottom line: riveting