How to reduce the risk of suffering from dementia

According to the new guidelines published by the World Health Organization (WHO), exercise regularly, do not smoke, avoid the harmful use of alcohol, control body weight, follow a healthy diet and maintain blood pressure, sugar in blood and cholesterol at adequate levels can reduce the risk of suffering from dementia.

"It is estimated that the number of people suffering from dementia will triple in the next 30 years," explained WHO Director General, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. "We have to do everything possible to reduce the risk of people suffering from dementia. The scientific information we have obtained for the elaboration of these guidelines confirms what we had been suspecting for some time: what is good for the heart is good for the brain ».

The guidelines provide basic information for health care providers to recommend to patients measures that can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia. They will also serve as a guide for governments, policymakers and planning authorities in the development of policies and programs to promote healthy lifestyles.

The scientific information we have obtained for the elaboration of these guidelines confirms what we had been suspecting for a long time: what is good for the heart is good for the brain

The reduction of risk factors is one of several areas of the WHO global action plan on the public health response to dementia. Other areas are: the strengthening of information systems on dementia, diagnosis, treatment and care, support for carers of people suffering from dementia and research and innovation.

The WHO World Dementia Observatory, created in December 2017, is a platform for information on countries' activities and resources to combat dementia, for example, national plans, initiatives suitable for people with dementia, awareness campaigns and care services.

Description of the study
 The information comes from 21 countries, including Chile, France, Japan, Jordan and Togo, and there are currently a total of 80 countries that participate in the presentation of more data.

The creation of national policies and plans on dementia is one of WHO's key recommendations for countries to address this increasingly important health problem. In 2018, WHO supported countries such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Qatar, Slovenia and Sri Lanka to develop a public, general and multisectoral health response to dementia.

WHO created iSupport, an online training program for caregivers of people with dementia with advice on the general management of care tasks

A key element in each national plan for dementia is support for caregivers of people with this disease, said Dr. Dévora Kestel, Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse at WHO.

"Very often, caregivers of people with dementia are often family members who need to make important changes in their private and working lives in order to take care of those loved ones."

That is why WHO created iSupport, an online training program for caregivers of people with dementia with advice on the general management of care tasks, how to act in response to changes in patient behavior and way to take care of your own health ». iSupport is currently used in eight countries and is expected to reach more soon.

A public health problem
Dementia is a disease characterized by cognitive deterioration higher than expected by normal aging. It affects memory, language, the sense of orientation and the capacity for understanding, reasoning, judgment, calculation and learning. Dementia occurs as a result of a series of diseases and injuries that affect the brain, such as Alzheimer's disease or stroke.

Dementia is a rapidly growing public health problem that affects 50 million people worldwide. About 10 million new cases are produced each year. Dementia is a major cause of disability and dependence among older people. In addition, the disease is a high economic burden for society: it is estimated that the costs related to the care of people with dementia will reach US $ 2,000 million annually in 2030. (tagsToTranslate) dementia (t) predicted (t) pevencion

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