Friday, 19 Oct 2018
Business

Mexican scientists design synthetic proteins

  • Mexican scientists collaborated in the creation of de novo proteins that interact with botulism toxin and H1 influenza hemagglutinin
  • De novo proteins are those molecules that have an amino acid sequence that does not exist in nature

Three Mexican scientists were part of a research group that created and documented a new high-throughput method to produce thousands of synthetic proteins, under the direction of David Baker, head of the Protein Design Institute at the University of Washington, United States.

In the project, Daniel Adriano Silva Manzano, postdoctoral researcher granted a scholarship by the National Council of Science and Technology ( Conacyt ) at the University of Washington, as well as Daniel Alejandro Fernández Velasco, doctor in basic biomedical research, and Renan Vergara Gutiérrez, student of the doctorate in biochemical sciences, both belonging to the Physicochemistry and Protein Engineering Laboratory of the Faculty of Medicine of the University National Autonomous Government of Mexico (UNAM).

Mexican scientists collaborated in the creation of de novo proteins that interact with the botulism toxin and H1 influenza hemagglutinin. De novo proteins are those molecules that have an amino acid sequence that does not exist in nature, that is, they are synthetic and developed entirely from a computer platform.

Traditionally, proteins are isolated from organisms (such as bacteria or fungi) and then used as therapeutic agents, but recent advances in computer design allow the generation of synthetic proteins with new functions or improve the characteristics of natural proteins for medical purposes. and biotechnology. The first time a protein was designed by computer was in 2003. Since then, the computational design of more than 20 different proteins has been reported.

%d bloggers like this: