patient’s first death after reinfection

THE ESSENTIAL

  • Genetic analyzes of the virus, carried out post mortem, revealed that they are indeed two different strains of the virus, confirming that it is a second infection.
  • No trace of antibodies was found in his blood following the first infection.

While more and more official cases of reinfection, the first case of a person who died following a second infection appeared. She is an 89-year-old Dutchwoman. This death was reported in an October 9 article in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Two different strains of the virus

59 days passed between the first and second infection of this octogenarian. The first infection led her to hospitalization for a severe cough. She was able to come out five days later but still suffered from persistent fatigue. This woman also had a rare cancer of the bone marrow and started chemotherapy 59 days after the first infection. It was then that she developed a strong cough, fever and difficulty breathing. Despite her immune deficiency from immunosuppressive therapy, her condition did not lead doctors to fear for her life from the virus. “Its innate immune response and T cell immunity are normally sufficient to clear SARS CoV-2”The researchers wrote.

When she tested positive for Covid-19 a second time, no trace of antibodies was found in her blood. This suggests, according to the researchers, that they did not persist after the first infection. Her condition rapidly deteriorated and she died two weeks later. Genetic analyzes of the virus, carried out post mortem, revealed that they are indeed two different strains of the virus, confirming that it is a second infection. “It is therefore likely that the second episode was a reinfection rather than a prolonged infection.”, Confirm the researchers.

Sometimes the first infection is more serious, sometimes it’s the second

Among the official cases of re-infection with Covid-19, the second infection is not necessarily more serious than the first. Of the five global cases reported so far, three had a first infection more severe than the second. These results prove that barrier measures must be observed by everyone, including those who have experienced a first infection and who remain under the threat of new contamination. “People who have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 should continue to take precautions, including physical distancing, wearing a mask and washing their hands.”, Concluded Mark Pandori, researcher at the University of Nevada and author of the study, published on October 12 in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases, on the different global cases of reinfection.


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