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Responding to China’s Missile Day at the expense of breaking the 1% cap of defense spending GDP


Japan’s Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi is preparing to break the long-standing limit that defense spending must not exceed 1% of GDP.Picture: Retrieved from Kishi Nobuo’s Twitter

Japan’s Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi said earlier that he plans to abolish the 1% limit on defense spending that cannot exceed GDP.

In an interview with Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Nobuo Kishi pointed out that Japan is ready to abolish the long-term annual defense spending GDP cap and strengthen its own defense capabilities, just as Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga visited US President Biden last month ( Joe Biden), the promise made.

Nobuo Kishi pointed out, “Considering China’s enhanced capabilities and development in areas such as space, cyber, and electromagnetic spectrum operations, we must increase defense capabilities at an unprecedented rate…. We will appropriately allocate what we need to protect our country. Funds, regardless of expenditures related to GDP (the GDP 1% cap).”

Nobuo Kishi declared: “We will strengthen space, cyber, and electromagnetic spectrum operations and other new areas…. Technological innovation is advancing at an astonishing speed, and the nature of combat is changing.”

Since the 1990s, the only time Japan’s defense spending exceeded 1% of GDP was the 2010 fiscal year, when the global financial crisis just happened and the GDP plummeted. By fiscal year 2021, the country’s defense budget has grown for 9 consecutive years, but it is still less than 1% of GDP.

Breaking the 1% cap of GDP on defense spending will mark a turning point in Japan’s security policy and may also cause China to rebound.

Nobuo Kishi pointed out that the Japanese government will continue to discuss whether it should develop strike capabilities against enemy bases in response to upcoming missile launches. He said: “People are aware that simply improving our interception capabilities may not be enough to protect the public.”

Regarding the issue of whether Japan and the United States intend to modify the national defense guidelines for possible conflicts in the Taiwan Strait, Kishi said that although there is no plan to do so at present, “we need to adapt to changes in the situation and make changes as needed.”

Nobuo Kishi pointed out that the Japanese government will continue to discuss whether it should develop strike capabilities against enemy bases in response to upcoming missile launches.

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