Monday, 15 Oct 2018
Health

Sparkling water, less healthy than still water?

Have you ever looked at the label of a bottle of sparkling water more closely? Zero calories, zero sugar, zero aroma, no artificial color. However, sparkling water sometimes gives rise to reservations and myths about its effects on health abound. Does sparkling water erode teeth? Does it damage the bones? Does it hydrate as well as still water?

Although there is still not much research on this subject, studies have shown that, yes, sparkling water hydrates as well as still water, as reported in the scientific magazine Live Science . This makes sense, since carbonated water is only ordinary water in which carbon dioxide is dissolved.

So what about the claim that carbonated water is more likely to erode teeth and bone calcium? There is no evidence that drinking carbonated water has an effect on the level of calcium in our body. In contrast, a study published in 2015 in the Journal of the American Dental Association has shown that unlike soft drinks, the level of acidity of soft drinks (pH around 5) is not enough to erode tooth enamel. “Gasification per se does not lead to dental erosion “, at assisted Dr. John Ruby of the University of Alabama (USA) and author of the study.

Stop sparkling sparkling waters

If there is no risk to the teeth when drinking sparkling water, this is not the case when it is flavored. It then contains citric acid (which is naturally found in citrus fruits such as lemon and lime), which can be acidic enough to damage enamel. “Instead, prefer a slice of lemon or other fruits or vegetables, like cucumber, in your sparkling natural water. In this form, your drink will be less acidic, advises Dr. Georges Lamboley, dental surgeon, and founder of the Medident Laboratory, based in Nice.

(Photo: Pixabay)

On the other hand, some sparkling waters contain sodium to mimic the taste of mineral waters. The amount may be small and varies by brand. But the high consumption of sodium is harmful to health. It can raise blood pressure.

Finally, if we love bubbles, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, headquartered in New York (USA), strongly recommend preferring sparkling water to soda that contains sugar.

The arbitration between still water or sparkling water should rather be a choice between weakly or richly mineralized waters. They provide more or less micronutrients, minerals and trace elements necessary for the body. It is advisable to be vigilant against labels. And as a reminder, it is recommended to drink 1.5 liters of water a day.

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