Port goods that donate thousands of masks, gloves to health workers – NBC 7 San Diego

There are serious concerns among frontline health professionals
on the availability of masks, gloves, clothes and other personal protective equipment
equipment (PPE) on offer nationwide, but help is on the way to Sharp
Rees-Stealy medical center.

If gloves, masks and visors are weapons to fight
the war on the coronavirus, a San Diego nurse who says her PPE is now under lock and key
the key feels unarmed.

“It’s really frustrating because sometimes you wonder
there will be an N95 mask there, is there a visor? “Nurse
Shannon Cotton wondered.

Cotton and other nurses, doctors and EMT are taking the
coronavirus has reported help and local residents and businesses
they are answering their call. At the request of community members, Sharp Healthcare
is coordinating a PPE donation campaign.

“They want to help, especially when people are in this state of residence. They want to feel like they’re doing something, ”said Sharp spokesman John Cihomsky.

But healthcare professionals are receiving help from more than just a simple one
people at home.

The famous tool dealer Harbor Freight is donating all the gloves, masks and face shields to the shelves of its over 1,000 stores, and everything in its warehouse, to the cause.

“Right now we understand that the best thing we could do is
provide our frontline staff in hospitals, ”Harbor Freight
said spokesman Craig Hoffman.

The company has 45 million pairs of gloves, hundreds of thousands
of N95 masks and tens of thousands of visors to give.

Their generosity resonates with San Diego shoppers

“Rubber gloves were one of the things on our list and I saw the
sign up and think it’s really cool, “said customer Adam Prange.

Harbor Freight plans to begin shipping supplies within the week,
and Sharp’s donation unit officially starts on Wednesday at several drive-up drop-offs
sites. You don’t even have to get out of your car to donate.

Sharp will update these release sites here.

While it is appreciated, the use of homemade masks is, however
now prohibited.

Sharp is asking that if you are not feeling well, for the sake of volunteers, please send your donation with a friend.

Anyone looking to help supplies donated by Harbor Freight to where they are needed can contact the company.

Cihomsky said his hospitals have adequate supplies, but for
how long it has not been known.

.

Coronavirus Melbourne: Victorians warned of life under the coronavirus blockade

This coronavirus article is unlocked and free to read in the interest of community health and safety. For full access to Herald Sun / Leader journalism, sign up here.

Victorian selfish parents have been lashed out for ignoring social removal after the start of the school holidays, while state coronavirus cases continue to grow.

The number of Victorian cases has increased by 56 overnight, with 411 people so far positive.

Schools have been closed from today, but for now the childcare facilities and kindergartens remain open.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews this morning said that these numbers would continue to rise if Victorians continued to “live their lives normally” and ignore the strict rules of social estrangement to stop the spread of the “deadly” virus.

“Cases keep growing,” he told Triple M.

“I can inform you that there will be up to 411 cases, or 56 new cases overnight and will continue to go back and forth, particularly if some people in the Victorian community don’t start taking it seriously.

“There are people out there who don’t distance themselves, who live their lives normally.

“They don’t respect the fact that this is fatal and if it continues to spread and people don’t do the right thing, then people will die.”

Yesterday a cyclist passed Flinders Street station. Image: Asanka Ratnayake / Getty Images
media_cameraYesterday a cyclist passed Flinders Street station. Image: Asanka Ratnayake / Getty Images

Mr. Andrews also affected parents who were still allowing play dates and social activities after school closed.

“Children can’t go to the mall, children can’t stay in the place of their mates,” he said.

Andrews has three children aged 13 to 18 and has claimed to be self-insulating.

“They are experiencing the best part of three weeks when they don’t see their friends, they don’t go to the Chadstone mall.

“They are not doing all the usual things … because there is nothing usually in this situation.”

It comes when Victorians are asked to cancel barbecues in the courtyard, think twice about traveling to the hairdresser and shop online while authorities try to strengthen the state’s unprecedented blockade.

The National Coronavirus Cabinet will meet tonight to consider a second phase of closings after pubs, clubs, gyms, cinemas and churches have all been forced to close for the first time in history Monday.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Andrews have warned the community, warning that a wider arrest will come unless people respond to measures already in place to stop the rampant spread of the virus.

It comes as the Gold FM Breakfast show was not broadcast this morning due to a COVID-19 scare.

Conductor Christian O’Connell said the radio station suffered a blockage, preventing them from airing.

People toured the streets outside Centrelink Abbotsford on Monday.
media_cameraPeople toured the streets outside Centrelink Abbotsford on Monday.

“The station had to suffer a 24-hour emergency crown freeze,” he said on Twitter.

“Building evacuated and station stopped for 24 hours. The show will return tomorrow. “

He said the show that aired this morning was a “recorded special” that had been pre-recorded in the event of an evacuation.

Meanwhile, it was revealed that a NAB employee had falsified the results of coronavirus tests, causing hundreds of employees to be evacuated from Bourke St’s NAB office and fear of their own health.

On March 17, the NAB management was informed that a staff member who worked at the 700 Bourke St office had tested positive for COVID-19, at which point the staff were asked to work remotely and the office was cleaned in pandemic way.

Subsequently, it was determined by management that the test information provided by the employee was falsified.

In a note to NAB staff, it was noted that the hiring of the staff member had been interrupted.

“Reflecting on the gravity of the matter, the colleague will not return to the NAB,” said the note.

“We certainly regret the uncertainty that this has caused to our colleagues in 700 Bourke St, especially those who work closely with the colleague in question.

“Of course leaving the house was the right decision with the information that provided us with a precautionary measure to protect the health and well-being of everyone who works at 700 Bourke St.”

The headquarters of NAB Bourke St, which has been evacuated.
media_cameraThe headquarters of NAB Bourke St, which has been evacuated.

WHAT IS THE NEXT STAGE AFTER THE FIRST STAGE OF LOCKDOWN?

Tonight’s National Cabinet will also consider renter support and workforce and supply chain issues affecting the healthcare system.

Morrison said that coronavirus was an economic and public health crisis “once every 100 years”.

“For many, young and old, 2020 will be the most difficult year of our lives,” he said.

“We are a strong nation and a strong people, but in the coming months this will test us all like, at no time since the Second World War.”

Andrews yesterday detonated “selfish” Victorians for putting vulnerable people at risk by ignoring the request to stay 1.5m away from others to minimize the spread of the virus.

“There are many Victorians who act selfishly. If this continues, people will die, “he said.

“You won’t be able to go to the pub because the pub is closed. That doesn’t mean you can have all your mates at home and get the beers up.”

“Whether you want to call him a partner, or be a good Australian, or respect your civil duty, I don’t care what you call him, just do it.”

“If you don’t, then will people die and do you know who dies? The most vulnerable people in the Victorian community. Do the right thing, do the smart thing, do the decent thing.”

“If you don’t, you have every reason to believe that Victoria Police will catch you and you will be punished.”

The dean of St Paul's cathedral, Heather Patacca, is preparing to take online services. Image: Mark Stewart
media_cameraThe dean of St Paul’s cathedral, Heather Patacca, is preparing to take online services. Image: Mark Stewart

Fines of $ 20,000 for individuals and $ 100,000 for businesses are pending for those who have been caught breaking the new coronavirus rules – such as holding mass meetings or failing to isolate themselves after returning from abroad.

There will be random checks on the road, with 5000 policemen specially deployed by the Victoria police in a special coronavirus task force.

Disruptions are likely for many months due to the crisis as the number of reported cases continues to increase.

Andrews said he has no plans to follow Queensland, Western Australia, Southern Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory and to close state borders, but this could change if the threat to life increases.

School holidays are already in chaos, with families urged to download nonessential plans.

“The fact that more steps may be needed does not diminish the magnitude of a change: we have never done this before in any of our lives,” said Andrews.

But a Victorian Christian school snubbed state government directives, refusing to carry on the Easter school holidays and telling families that God is not surprised by the coronavirus pandemic.

And in the United Kingdom, the British public is allowed to leave their homes only to buy food, medicine or to do essential work, given that the country is completely blocked.

STAY HOME FOR OUR HOSPITAL HEROES

Doctors and nurses who endanger their lives to save their own ask the Victorians to stay home and obey the vital rules of social distancing of the coronavirus.

As the state is stuck due to concerns that the Victorians are not taking their responsibilities for isolation seriously, staff from the Royal Melbourne Hospital made a candid appeal which they hope will strike at home:

“We stayed at work for you. So stay home for us. “

Needed on the front lines in certain roles to put them in touch with COVID-19 in the coming weeks, medical staff don’t have the luxury of taking social removal measures to protect them.

But Mark Putland, director of emergency medicine for RMH, said that simply staying at home and limiting the spread of the infection is a matter of life or death – thousands of times – for ordinary Victorians.

“People can really save lives by doing this,” said Putland.

“We can do extraordinary things for a certain number of people, but there is a certain limit beyond which we can no longer help people if they all arrive at the same time.

Royal Melbourne Hospital staff gather outside the main entrance to urge people to stay home. Image: David Caird
media_cameraRoyal Melbourne Hospital staff gather outside the main entrance to urge people to stay home. Image: David Caird

“We must ask everyone else not to put ourselves at risk anymore, not to make our work vain. We are here to do this job, but we need others to do their part too, so it is possible for us to do ours ”.

While efforts focus on building the capacity of state hospitals, dr. Putland said that great encouragement was taken from the results of nations such as Korea and Germany, where early spacing measures have been very effective in slowing down COVID-19.

“We are ahead of much of the world here in Victoria by taking these measures and keeping the state frozen before we actually had a Coronavirus death in Victoria.

“Many other places left him much later than that and therefore didn’t benefit from it.

“It gives us the only chance we have of making a difference on how much this disease affects our community.

“We are very grateful to have the privilege of being able to do something truly constructive and to be on the front line and try to fight this thing.

“But I don’t want other people to think that they can’t do something too – they can, just by sitting at home. By isolating themselves, they can make a really significant contribution.”

– Grant McArthur

REGUE STARTS SOON IN CENTRELINK

The Melburnians are already queuing outside Centrelink offices across the city, attempting to access new stimulus payments.

Some people facing unemployment for the first time in their lives lined up more than four hours before the doors opened.

In Prahran, some are lined up from 4.30 in the morning when the doors don’t open until 8.30 in the morning.

It comes as the MyGov website crashed yesterday while over 95,000 jobless Australians attempted to apply for coronavirus income support.

People lined up outside a still open Centrelink office in Heidelberg. Image: AAP Image / Stefan Postles
media_cameraPeople lined up outside a still open Centrelink office in Heidelberg. Image: AAP Image / Stefan Postles
Centrelink's offices in Australia have been flooded with people trying to register for unemployment benefits following business closings. Image: AAP Image / Stefan Postles
media_cameraCentrelink’s offices in Australia have been flooded with people trying to register for unemployment benefits following business closings. Image: AAP Image / Stefan Postles

COURT CLOSED, PUBLISH EMPTY AS THE START OFF

Victoria courts will be shut down on Tuesday with an automatic three-month update to hundreds of listings.

In a statement to lawyers on Monday evening, chief magistrate Lisa Hannan said that all criminal hearings through state magistrates’ courts, with the exception of filing hearings, mentions for commissions and hearings for commissions, will be updated until to June 15th.

Defendants in court or on bail will no longer have to attend filing hearings, provided they are represented by a lawyer.

In civil matters, lawyers and stakeholders were asked not to participate in the court.

The disputed commission hearings and Koori judicial matters have already been suspended across the state.

Four practical instructions for lawyers have been posted on the court website.

The indications, which go into effect on Tuesday at 9 am, have been widely praised by lawyers as a reasonable step to protect users of the court.

Chief magistrate Hannan said the move was made due to health and safety concerns for COVID-19 and the need to reduce the number of people attending the court.

Learn more about Victoria’s partial closure.

BREAKING AUSSIE BRINGS HOPE FOR THE VACCINE

A “passive gap gap” vaccine for COVID-19 will see the collection of antibodies from the blood of patients who have recovered from the virus injected into vulnerable individuals.

It comes as losing your sense of smell emerged as one of the first signs of COVID-19.

Meanwhile, researchers from the University of Queensland are looking for 100 healthy volunteers to take part in clinical trials of a candidate vaccine for COVID-19 mid-year.

Melbourne’s Doherty Institute is working on a new COVID-19 rapid test which takes just 30 minutes to get an improvement over the three hours needed now.

Royal Melbourne Hospital's COVID-19 screening clinic, nurse ED Robyn Lindsay, has seen the number of people getting tested go down. Image: David Caird
media_cameraRoyal Melbourne Hospital’s COVID-19 screening clinic, nurse ED Robyn Lindsay, has seen the number of people getting tested go down. Image: David Caird

ANSWERS THE MAIN QUESTIONS FOR THE CORONAVIRUS VICTORIANS SHUTDOWN

Victoria’s new blocking rules will change lives as we know it across the state.

From hairdressers to weddings, children’s birthday parties, and bike rides, we’ve asked the state government 50 questions about how Victorians face their lives during the coronavirus crisis.

We have compiled their responses, which assume that people are healthy and have not been abroad or in contact with any confirmed coronavirus cases.

Read the full list here.

Do you have a question we haven’t asked ourselves? Email it to news@heraldsun.com.au

OLYMPIC GAMES POSTPONED

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics were reportedly postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

International Olympic Committee member Dick Pound has confirmed that the Games will be held at a later date, most likely in 2021.

THE CAMPSITE CAN AVOID “INCREDIBLE TRAGEDY”

Any Victorian who thinks to escape for a vacation to escape the coronavirus block can rethink.

Premier Daniel Andrews has issued a monotonous warning that traveling unnecessary means not traveling for holidays.

Stay home is the message. Or the community could face “a rather surprising tragedy,” he said.

And Lisa Neville, minister of police and emergency services, warned that roadblocks could be used to prevent people from ignoring the council.

Campsites and trailer parks were “highly contagious” when there were shared toilets and showers, Neville said.

“We are very careful about camping and caravan sites. There are potentially high risks for people who share showers and toilets etc.”

Yesterday, the campsites, including Walkerville Foreshore in Gippsland, were closed or closed, but the trailer parks with long-term and permanent occupants, most of them in independent cabins or caravans, were still open to the public.

Discovery Parks said that as a housing provider, its parks have been an essential service at a time of crisis.

Parks Victoria closed the lodging and camped in Tidal River at the Wilsons Promontory National Park on Sunday.

Parks Victoria closed the lodge and camped at Tidal River in the Wilsons Promontory National Park. Image: James Lauritz
media_cameraParks Victoria closed the lodge and camped at Tidal River in the Wilsons Promontory National Park. Image: James Lauritz

Further updates on access to other campsites in the state were expected in the coming days.

But Andrews said families shouldn’t be leaving now that the kids are on vacation.

“It’s going to be a very different school vacation,” Andrews said.

“And it must be. Because if we don’t start taking these things seriously, we’ll talk about a rather surprising tragedy. “

Travel warnings come when regional airline Rex says regional flights to Victoria will stop on April 6.

Rex operates services from Melbourne and Mildura in six locations in New South Wales, South Australia and Tasmania.

The fixed-wing fleet Ambulance Victoria, operated by the subsidiary Rex Pel-Air Aviation, will continue to operate.

Melbourne’s trains and trams and the V / Line network are still operating during normal hours.

Extra cleaning has been introduced and passengers have been urged to stagger travel times to help with social distances.

The Victorian parks operated by Discovery, Top Parks and Big 4 were still open for business, although many guests had returned home.

In a statement, Discovery Parks said that changing travel restrictions meant that some people needed to find accommodation.

“We also have caravan communities that are currently traveling and require a safe place to stay,” says the note.

GREEN LIGHT DATA STIMULES PACKAGES

The multi-billion dollar economic response package to the coronavirus received the final tick of approval in the House of Representatives around 11pm Monday evening.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said that the economic measures, described as the most significant since wartime, were designed to build a bridge to recovery from the other side of the virus.

“We know that the economic situation has deteriorated over the days,” he said at a late night press conference in Parliament.

“The Australian people can be sure that their parliament has reached political division tonight.

“We face an enemy who has no flag and has no face.

“We must deploy every weapon in our arsenal to defeat it.”

The treasurer said he expected around one million Australians to receive the coronavirus supplement.

– Tamsin Rose

AFL PLAYERS OFFER A MASSIVE PAYMENT

AFL players voluntarily offered a 50% cut, with immediate effect.

On one of the darkest days of footy, the 850 players in the game decided to halve their wages until May 31 – the restart date proposed by the competition.

If the 2020 season is abandoned, players will agree to even more drastic reductions in wages.

It came when entire football departments were eliminated under Fair Work provisions. Some will likely be fired in the coming days.

US STOCKS FALL IN THE MIDDLE OF THE CONGRESSIVE FIGHT ON STIMULUS

Wall Street fell on Monday (local time) when the U.S. Congress quarreled over a massive stimulus package as the Federal Reserve unveiled new emergency plans to revive the economy, even with the unlimited purchase of bonds.

The scale of the Federal Reserve’s moves has impressed investors, but in the first few minutes of trading the shares have still dropped as concerns continue to rise over the economic pain caused by the coronavirus epidemic.

Central banks are doing everything they can to support the economy as other states and communities close, but investors also want to see the United States government do its part.

WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO AFL FAN MEMBERS?

Footy fans will have to wait to see if registrations they paid for will be refunded after the AFL season has ended.

While AFL and clubs are facing the fallout from the already shortened season put on hold amid the coronavirus pandemic, the league has yet to decide what to do with regards to enrollment.

In a statement, AFL said it was working last night.

“The main concern of AFL and the clubs is that members and supporters continue to take the relevant precautions to ensure that their health and well-being is critical,” he said.

“AFL will work with clubs to ensure that their members are well-informed and clubs will continue to communicate with their members during this temporary suspension of the season.”

AFL Fans Association President Gerry Eeman said supporters want clarity.

“Fans don’t want a refund, they want the option to get a refund,” he said.

“Because many fans realize that their clubs are in danger of folding but if you don’t have money alone, it’s a luxury they can’t afford to treat them like a donation.

“Some will do it … but people who have just lost their jobs and don’t have much money to feed their family need the option to get a refund.”

In a memo to members, Hawthorn President Jeff Kennett said yesterday that he doubted that the AFL season will resume “before July soon.”

“This therefore means that the revenue generated by the competition and the clubs has been drastically reduced,” he said.

“For Hawthorn, we continue to receive revenue from registrations and some sponsorships.

“I thank all the members who promised their support for the club, it is more crucial than ever.”

It comes when the Yarra Junior Football League reconsidered its decision to start its season before the AFL recommended start date of May 31, in response to fears of the coronavirus.

The Picola and District Football Netball League has decided to “postpone” his season until May 2nd and to reconsider his position on April 17th “subject to the status of the COVID-19 pandemic” “.

– Peter Rolfe

ITALIAN POLITICS “FORGIVE THEM S —“

Politicians in Italy, where nearly 60,000 people have coronavirus and 5500 have died, are going crazy in an attempt to beat their rebel components to obey a national blockade amid the coronavirus.

“I receive news that some would like to organize graduation parties. We will send the police – with flamethrowers,” says Campania president Vincenzo De Luca in a video.

You can see four other Italian mayors and politicians agitating people for breaking the rules during the global crisis,

In a country famous for being overrun with tourists and party-goers, the new normal – blocking and being safe – is obviously not reaching many people easily.

OTHER NEWS CORONAVIRUS

HOW YOUR CLUB IS CONVENING WITH THE SUSPENDED SEASON

VIRUS SHUTDOWN: WHAT HAPPENS TO GYM CONTRACTS?

WHY YOU MUST NOT lie to your children about CORONAVIRUS

AUSSIE TROOPES THE RETURN HOME AMONG THE VIRUS CRISIS

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Atomic Veterans of America – NBC Connecticut

The enemy Hank Bolden
faced did not come from a distant front line.

It came from the skies.

It’s a battle that’s still going on 65 years later. Bolden, who is now 82 years old, is an atomic veteran – one of hundreds of thousands of American service members used in human testing by the United States government during post-WWII nuclear tests and sworn to a secret life.

“They wanted to see how the living soldiers would resist the exposure
to radiation, ”recalls Bolden. “Before using live soldiers they were using
mannequins. But you don’t get real results using mannequins as you would
live bodies. “


A DIFFERENT TIME

While accompanying a friend to a New Haven recruiting station in 1953, Bolden was invited to join the army. At just 16 years old then and already out of high school, he admits that he “pulled down” his birth certificate to move to the age of 18, joining the approximately 200,000 underage soldiers who would have served during the Second World War and the eras of the Korean War.

After basic training in
Fort Dix was assigned to work as a tank mechanic in Texas before moving to Texas
California and becoming a surface-to-air missile mechanic.

Despite an executive order issued in July
26, 1948, by President Harry S. Truman to desegregate the armed forces, the last one
the all black units of the army were not abolished until 1954. And in 1955, Bolden
he says, racist attitudes persist even after the units have been racially integrated.

“The residual thoughts of people were firm
linger, “he says.” My outfit was 800 people strong. Thirteen of us were
black. Ten were from the South, who were more tolerant of treatment
they got racially. But the three of us from the North couldn’t tolerate it,
so I have had many fights over this. So I was the guy they wanted
get rid of.”

It would not be the only race
discrimination Bolden would witness as a soldier.


SECRET
ASSIGNMENT

In 1955, the seventeen year old
he was suddenly ordered to the Nevada desert without explanation.

“They don’t tell you what you’re going to face,” he said. “Nobody
they knew what they were going to face. ”

What he would eventually face was a classified operation known as Operation Teapot at the Nevada Test Site. In a series of 14 bomb throws, or “hits”, military officials tried to test the effects of nuclear bombs on structures and strategies, animals and people.

All races of military personnel
participated in the Teapot operation. But upon arrival in Nevada, Bolden was
astounded to accomplish all the other soldiers in his new specially selected unit
for a mysterious assignment they were also black.

“There was this myth about black people
be able to resist, tolerate certain things more than any other race “, he
He says. “So it was a test on that too.”


AN ATOMIC NIGHT

One morning in February, Bolden
the unit was ordered in a desert trench. Unbeknownst to them, it was excavated
the expected route of the fallout, only 2.8 miles away from what it would have become
ground zero for the launch of an atomic bomb.

Even though a countdown sounded on the speakers, Bolden says, the soldiers still had no idea what they were about to face. Without protective gear in addition to the normal fabrics and helmets, they waited and looked.

“They tell you to cover your eyes”
he says.

On February 18, 1955, Shot Wasp, the first nuclear test of Operation Teapot, detonated a Mark 6 nuclear bomb dropped by a B-36 exactly at noon. A monstrous cloud of mushrooms filled the sky, reaching 21,500 feet in height.

“With radiation, when you put your arms over your eyes or hands, you actually see the bones, you see the bones in your body from the exposure. You can see your skeleton. “

After the relapse the warning came.

“You swore not to speak
“said Bolden. The soldiers were threatened with imprisonment and fines for violation
The oath.

For 60 years, Bolden didn’t tell anyone. No this
family, not his wife, not his children. Not even her doctors when she spies on her
tumors have started to show. He developed bladder and posterior subcapsular cancer
cataract and in 1990 multiple myeloma was diagnosed.

“They actually gave me three and a half years
four years to live, ”recalls Bolden.
So in 1995 I should have been a statistic. “

But in 1995, Bolden was in remission. He is a citizen
the secret was coming to light.


HIDDEN STORY

Government figures estimate between 400,000 and 550,000 US military personnel who participated in a series of nuclear tests between 1946 and 1992. According to the Department of Defense’s Defense Threat Reduction Agency, this includes post occupation forces -Second World War of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, prisoners of war in Japan at the end of the Second World War, participants in the atmospheric nuclear tests in Nevada and the Pacific from 1945 to 1962 and participants in the underground nuclear tests in Nevada from 1951 to 1992.

Many of these “atomic veterans” have succumbed before their own
the stories have become public, their bodies are full of tumors. In
1990, the veil of secrecy began to lift.

After setting up the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments to investigate 10-year experiments, President Clinton made a formal apology to American atomic veterans on October 3, 1995. By order of the president, Congress would repeal the nuclear radiation agreement law. and secrecy, allowing atomic veterans to talk about their experiences without fear of fines or treason charges. And financial compensation has been opened to all qualified atomic veterans.

“Those who led the government when these decisions were made are no longer here to take responsibility for what they have done. They are not here to apologize to survivors, family members or their communities whose lives have been overshadowed by shadow of these choices So today, on behalf of another generation of American leaders and another generation of American citizens, the United States of America offers sincere apologies to those of our citizens who have undergone these experiments. the government is wrong, we have a moral responsibility to admit it, “said President Bill Clinton on October 3, 1995

But the television address has been obscured. The same happened
day when OJ Simpson’s verdict was issued in a live classroom feed, taking
on televisions and news cycles across America.

As a result, many skilled veterans had no idea of ​​the ban
the secrecy had been lifted, nor that they could claim benefits. Bolden no
find out until he researched the Internet, he says, in 2015.

“I was once so angry and so aggravating with the government that I thought I would be murdered to keep me from talking,” he says.

When Bolden attempted to apply for subsidies, he found that the burden of proof was placed on his fellow atomic veterans. The government would give compensation from the date a complaint was filed, but not retroactively, and only if the veteran could prove that he had participated in the tests – which proved to be an almost impossible task after millions of military documents were destroyed in a 1973 fire against the National Staff Registration Center. As many as 18 million documents were burned, including 80% of all army personnel discharged between 1912 and 1960.

“They hoped for it
would have died sooner or would have been one of those guys who surrendered ”
says Anthony Bolden, Hank’s son. “No thanks. Hank doesn’t have it.”

After paying her
own pocket for a polygraph lie detector pouch, Hank eventually claimed
approved, setting a precedent for other atomic veterans whose records were
destroyed.

Photo: Hidden story: the atomic veterans of America

Hit a high note

“The love of music has
I’ve always been there. “

After his honorable discharge
from the army, Bolden went to work as an engineer before deciding to pursue a
career as a jazz musician who works while his family grows. Tell the story
while cradling the tenor saxophone that has been at his side since 1967. The “Rolls
Royce “of tools, he says.

The brand is Selmer. IS
in a strange coincidence, the model is a 6 sign. It is the same name as the shot
Wasp atomic bomb design.

But this is where the
the similarities end. The bomb was his nightmare. Music, his dream and his
outlet to work through the trauma of what lived in Nevada
desert.

“It’s like the blood inside
my veins. It takes away all my other thoughts, “he says

Bolden is finally
he receives compensation from the government and is now using it to help make his dream come true.
He returned to school, studying jazz performances at Hartt University of Hartford
School.

“They are like the relic
here with all these kids, you know, “he chuckles.

Professor Javon Jackson
says that the 82-year-old is leaving a unique mark on the prestigious program.

“He has a lot of emotion,” says Jackson. “He is a very bluesy, very full of feeling, a natural player. His life, wisdom and the things he has acquired allow him to play the way it sounds.”

LIVING HISTORY

The vast majority of
Today, the American atomic veterans of the atmospheric test era are gone. About
400,000 veterans were present during these tests, according to the veterans
Administration. Survivors’ numbers vary, from around 10,000 to 80,000
still alive.

Bolden believes he is one of only two surviving African American atomic veterans who are recognized and receive compensation from the government. He is on a mission to reach as many survivors as possible and help them request the long-awaited recognition and compensation.

And he’s sharing his story, he says, to make sure the plight of American atomic veterans is no longer ignored.

“When people like me pass by, this won’t be part of the story unless someone makes sure it’s kept alive.”

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