Pope Francis rescues Torvaianica transsexuals without money and customers because of the coronavirus

Since the quarantine there are no longer working, no longer have customers who stop on the coast. And so hunger started knocking on the houses of the trans who live almost hidden near Torvaianica. Pope francesco these days he has sent them cash aid and also a message to encourage these people to have faith. It was the parish priest of Torvaianica, Don Andrea Conocchia who, two weeks ago, at the door of his church – a rather anonymous seventies construction – saw himself approached by a rather attractive girl who asked him for some change or help . «Obviously I helped her, I understood that she was in a bad way and I didn’t ask too many questions. Two days later she returned with another friend, also a trans. Also in that case I gave them the parcels that we prepare with Caritas and the Food Bank full of basic necessities. Pasta, tomatoes, flour, oil, milk, biscuits, sugar “.

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The next day, however, the group increased until, in about ten days, the trans of the area found a point of reference in the church of Don Andrea. «Since they were almost all Brazilian, Colombian and Argentinean, I suggested that they send a message to the Pope. Which they did and which I have given to Cardinal Kraiweski that I have known for some time. Of course, I warned him by telling him that these were little protocol letters, in Spanish, with little hearts. The almsman showed up a few days later with the help of the Pope who appreciated their message “.

Don Andrea was very impressed by these people who now enter the church to pray. Some are HIV positive, others have other diseases. They have an indefinite age ranging from 40 to 50 years.

«The funny thing is that when I sent their messages to Cardinal Kraiewski I also inserted a copy of their document, because it is the practice. And from the documents it can be seen that at the registry office they still have the male name. Alessandro, Paulo, Marcelo. While in normal life I am Paula, Isabela, Felicita ».


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Pope Francis walks the deserted streets of Rome in the middle of the coronavirus blockade

Pope Francis challenged the Italian government’s advice to stay indoors and today walked the church on the deserted streets of Rome to pray for the end of the coronavirus.

Previously, the Catholic leader had given a blessing from his window on the balcony above a strangely empty square in San Pietro, which was closed to the faithful as part of the vast blockade of the country.

Francesco then left the Vatican to visit two churches in the Italian capital, praying first in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore before strolling along the usually busy Via del Corso.

He went to San Marcello al Corso, which strongly hosts a crucifix carried in a procession of 1522 in Rome when the city was hit by the plague.

Flanked by his security details, the 83-year-old pope, who had a cold, decided to walk the streets “as if on a pilgrimage,” said Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni.

His walkabout arrived a few hours after it was announced that Vatican Holy Week ceremonies will go on behind closed doors so as not to accelerate the skyrocketing infection rate that has risen to 24,747 today.

The country is fighting the second largest outbreak outside mainland China and mourns the death of 1,809 victims of the virus.

Everyday life has been turned upside down for millions of Italians: schools have been closed, cities have been sealed, canned sports games and mass gatherings have been banned.

Pope Francis challenged the Italian government's advice to stay indoors and today went to church on the deserted streets of Rome to pray for the end of the coronavirus

Pope Francis challenged the Italian government’s advice to stay indoors and today walked to church on the deserted streets of Rome to pray for the end of the coronavirus

This afternoon he delivered a blessing from his balcony window over a strangely empty St. Peter's square, which has been closed

This afternoon he delivered a blessing from his balcony window over a strangely empty St. Peter’s square, which has been closed

Flanked by his security details, Francesco walks along the usually animated Via del Corso in Rome “as if on a pilgrimage,” said the Vatican

St. Peter's Square was closed to worshipers, but a faithful today wore a mask and prayed outside during the blessing of Francis

St. Peter’s Square was closed to worshipers, but a faithful today wore a mask and prayed outside during the blessing of Francis

Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni said in a note that “as regards the liturgical celebrations of Holy Week, I can specify that all are confirmed”.

But Bruni added: “At present, the ways in which they would be conducted and who would participate in compliance with the security measures put in place to avoid the spread of the coronavirus are under study.”

He added that the faithful will be able to follow the ceremonies on TV, radio and through online media.

Streaming sermons have already been implemented, and before delivering his blessing from the balcony today, Francis was filmed praying safely in the Vatican’s private library.

Vatican media added that “until April 12 the General Public and the Angelus presided over by the Holy Father will only be available in live streaming on the official Vatican website.”

April 12 is Easter Sunday, when normally tens of thousands of faithful would fill St. Peter’s Square for an outdoor papal mass, listening to the Pope’s speech and receiving his blessing, delivered from the central balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica.

Although Easter itself was not specified in the Vatican declarations, restrictions on large gatherings seem likely to continue in Italy.

Francesco went to the church of San Marcello al Corso

He prayed before a crucifix carried in a procession of 1522 in Rome when the city was hit by the plague

Francesco went to the church of San Marcello al Corso (on the left), which has a crucifix carried in a procession of 1522 in Rome when the city was hit by the plague (on the right)

His blessing on an empty square arrived a few hours after it was announced that the Holy Week Easter ceremonies at the Vatican will go on behind closed doors so as not to accelerate Italy's very high infection rate.

His blessing on an empty square arrived a few hours after it was announced that the Holy Week Easter ceremonies at the Vatican will go on behind closed doors so as not to accelerate Italy’s very high infection rate.

Streaming sermons have already been implemented, and before handing over his blessing from the balcony today, Francis was filmed praying safely in the Vatican's private library

Streaming sermons have already been implemented, and before handing over his blessing from the balcony today, Francis was filmed praying safely in the Vatican’s private library

The Italian government has stated that it will decide whether the measures, in force until April 3, should be extended or strengthened.

Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday on April 5, with the tradition that involves an outdoor mass in the square that day too, when faithful palm fronds and olive branches.

Italy, the center of the conoravirus epidemic in Europe, is severely blocked, with the public limited to leaving their homes if not to buy food, go to work or some other urgent reason and must be at least one meter (about three feet) from each other.

The disease for most people causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some, like the elderly and frail, it can cause more serious illness.

At 83 with a partially compromised lung, Francis is among the most vulnerable to the potentially deadly effects of the infection. The Vatican says it has had a cold in the past few weeks.

Virus cases in Italy increased again on Sunday, with 3,590 other cases in a 24-hour period for a total of 24,747.

Pope Francis prays in the basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore for the end of the coronavirus pandemic, today in Rome

Pope Francis prays in the basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore for the end of the coronavirus pandemic, today in Rome

The obituary section of the Lombard newspapers has expanded tenfold

Chilling videos show the obituary of a local newspaper expanding from a single page to 10.

In the video, a man who speaks Italian zooms on the front page of L’Eco di Bergamo which circulates in the city in the Lombardy region.

After showing the date of the document – February 9 – he turns to the obituaries to reveal a page and a half of the published death notices.

On that date, Italy had recorded only three confirmed cases of Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

He therefore held an edition of the same newspaper from March 13, when the total number of cases skyrocketed to 17,600, including 1,266 deaths.

Slowly turning the pages and counting, it shows 10 full pages of obituaries, highlighting the horrible impact of the infection.

Deaths also increased, with 368 additional patients, bringing the overall death toll to 1,809. The additional infections reported Sunday represented the largest daily increase so far in Italy.

With St. Peter’s Square closed to the public and an infection case recently reported by the Vatican, Francesco Domenica delivered his traditional weekly commentary and blessing from the Apostolic Library instead of from a window overlooking the vast square.

Francis praised the priests for “creativity” in taking care of their flocks, especially in the Lombardy region, in northern Italy, where thousands have been hospitalized or quarantined.

He said their efforts have shown that there are “a thousand ways to be close” to the faithful, if not physically.

Some churches in Italy have been allowed to remain open for individual prayer, but all public masses are prohibited during the blockade of Italy to discourage crowding.

As the infections in Italy continue to swell, the governor of the Lombardy region of Milan Attilio Fontana said that the situation in the areas around the country’s financial center was only “getting worse”.

“We are close to the point where we will no longer be able to revive people because we will be out of the beds of intensive care units,” Fontana told Sky TG24 channel in Italy.

“We need those machines (doctors) used to ventilate the lungs, artificial respirators that we unfortunately cannot find,” said Fontana.

The Lombardy region has recorded 1,218 of Italian deaths officially attributed to COVID-19 in the past three weeks – more than the rest of Europe combined.

The 10 million region – slightly smaller but more economically productive than neighboring northern Switzerland – also has 13,272 reported infections and 767 people in intensive care.

The mayor of Milan Beppe Sala said he managed to guarantee shipments of surgical masks from China to help cover a growing shortage.

“Milan has always had excellent relationships with the main Chinese cities and in the last few days I have made some phone calls in search of masks,” said the mayor of Milan.

“The first shipment has arrived (Friday) and now we will distribute it to doctors, to our staff.”

The Italian Air Force plays Pavarotti singing Nessun Dorma as they perform incredible aerial performances to lift the spirits of their nation during the coronavirus block

By Amelia Wynne for MailOnline

The Italian Air Force played Pavarotti while singing Nessun Dorma while exhibiting an incredible air show to lift the spirits of their nation during the coronavirus blockade.

In a performance that reportedly the Air Force on a regular basis, a series of jet fighters used colored smoke to paint the Italian flag while the emotional song sounded.

The clip was shared by the Italian Air Force which stated: “Unity and teamwork have always been the principles on which our armed force is based and, at this moment more than ever, are fundamental”.

The footage of the event went viral on social media, with even Donald Trump sharing the video, declaring “the United States loves Italy.”

In a performance that reportedly the Air Force on a regular basis, a series of jet fighters used colored smoke to paint the Italian flag while the emotional song sounded

It is not known where the event occurred

In a performance that reportedly the Air Force on a regular basis, a series of jet fighters used colored smoke to paint the Italian flag while the emotional song sounded

Many online praised the use of the song which has lyrics like “look at the stars trembling with love and hope”, saying it was appropriate for current circumstances.

Coronavirus deaths in Italy increased by 368 overnight to bring the total to 1,809, while 24,747 people proved positive for the deadly insect.

Italian officials confirmed the jump today as the national blockade imposed by Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte earlier this month reverberates for another week.

The Air Force flies to the sky for performance

Many online praised the use of the song which has lyrics like “look at the stars trembling with love and hope”, saying it was appropriate for current circumstances

Shocking development comes when the chilling videos show the obituary of a local newspaper expanding from a single page to 10.

It arrives as thousands of Italians in Rome, Milan and Naples applauded health workers yesterday from their balconies and windows as they raised spirits with a flashmob during the draconian blockade of the coronavirus.

Families and neighbors also sang and blasted pots and pans for artists from cities across the country, organized yesterday by noon via the WhatsApp messaging service.

The footage of the event went viral on social media, with Donald Trump also sharing the video, declaring “the United States loves Italy”

Exultant spectators exclaimed patriotic and edifying phrases including “Viva l’Italia” (Viva l’Italia) and “Vinceremo” (we will win). The few cars on the street joined the choir with their horns ringing.

Many also waved banners decorated with rainbows and the phrase “Andra tutto benne” (everything will be fine).

The moving show follows Friday’s flashmob, where the Italians sang in chorus for a moving interpretation of the national anthem Fratelli d’Italia. Currently 60 million people are in a state of blockade in the Mediterranean country.

“I received a message in circulation, which was forwarded to me by a friend … which is basically encouraging Italians to participate in a kind of flashmob on Friday the 13th at 18:00,” said Yemi Adeyeye, residing in Rome.

‘My path came alive at that moment. It was an euphoric moment.

Jessica Phelan, 34, who lived in Rome for two years, said the neighbors were saying goodbye and saying goodbye to each other, and they later called “see you tomorrow” (see you tomorrow).

“I think it shows that people will continue to seek community,” he said, “even if they cannot socialize.

“It is a way of saying that we are all together.”

Residents on the balconies sing “Azzurro” during a flash mob to increase morale while the coronavirus blockade in Italy continues

A man, next to an Italian flag, participates in a flash mob to increase morale while the Italian government continues restrictive movement measures to combat the coronavirus epidemic, in Rome

A man, next to an Italian flag, participates in a flash mob to increase morale while the Italian government continues restrictive movement measures to combat the coronavirus epidemic, in Rome

People applaud Italian doctors during a flash mob to raise morale as the deadly coronavirus tears Italy

People applaud Italian doctors during a flash mob to raise morale as the deadly coronavirus tears Italy

People applaud Italian doctors during a flash mob to raise morale, as the Italian government imposes a blockade of the coronavirus

People applaud Italian doctors during a flash mob to raise morale, as the Italian government imposes a blockade of the coronavirus

People sing from their home windows during a flash mob launched across Italy to bring people together in Rome

People sing from their home windows during a flash mob launched across Italy to bring people together in Rome

People sing from their home windows during a flash mob launched across Italy to bring people together in Rome

People sing from their home windows during a flash mob launched across Italy to bring people together in Rome

Italians applaud and sing a moving interpretation of the Brothers of Italy from their balconies in Naples today during the coronavirus block

Italians applaud and sing a moving interpretation of the Brothers of Italy from their balconies in Naples today during the coronavirus block

People were also seen applauding Italian doctors and healthcare workers as they sang during the Rome flashmob today

People were also seen applauding Italian doctors and healthcare workers as they sang during the Rome flashmob today

Italians sit on their balconies in Rome and applaud for health workers in the flashmob organized through social media

Italians sit on their balconies in Rome and applaud for health workers in the flashmob organized through social media

Today people cheer and sing from their balconies in Rome. The country has been blocked due to the virus

Today people cheer and sing from their balconies in Rome. The country has been blocked due to the virus

This morning two women applaud healthcare workers in Rome's Gabriella neighborhood

This morning two women applaud healthcare workers in Rome’s Gabriella neighborhood

Residents on the balconies sing “Azzurro” during a flash mob to increase morale while the coronavirus blockade in Italy continues

A family greets and sings from their balcony in the Gabriella district of Rome today. The Italians aim to uplift the national spirit

A family greets and sings from their balcony in the Gabriella district of Rome today. The Italians aim to uplift the national spirit

A man looks from the balcony of an apartment with a banner that reads “Andra Tutto Bene” – “everything will be fine” – a phrase that has become a symbol of hope in the coronavirus crisis in Italy

People were photographed standing on their balconies with pets and one with a dog in Rome yesterday

People were photographed standing on their balconies with pets and one with a dog in Rome yesterday

On this balcony in the Gabriella district of Rome, banners with “Andra tutto benne” and the Italian flag are displayed

People shake and clap their hands during the flashmob in Rome's Gabriella neighborhood

People shake and clap their hands during the flashmob in Rome’s Gabriella neighborhood

Two women applaud from their balconies in Milan, Italy, while their country remains closed

Two women applaud from their balconies in Milan, Italy, while their country remains closed

A girl smiles and applauds as she joins the flashmob in Milan, Italy. It was organized by musicians through Whatsapp

A girl smiles and applauds as she joins the flashmob in Milan, Italy. It was organized by musicians through Whatsapp

A couple holds a banner with the words “everything will be fine” while they are stuck in their home in Naples, Italy

A woman from Turin smiles as she poses in front of her sign saying “everything will be fine” on her balcony yesterday

A couple in Turin smile and clap their hands on the balcony while they took part in the flashmob yesterday

A couple in Turin smile and clap their hands on the balcony while they took part in the flashmob yesterday

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Priests keep their distance from Pope Francis during the coronavirus blockade

Catholic priests kept their distance from Pope Francis over fears of the coronavirus today when the 3-foot Italian security rule reached the Vatican.

Francis kept an audience in his private library with his clerical translators sitting one meter away – the distance that Italy requires in public spaces to stop the spread of the virus.

Piazza San Pietro today remained empty with the usual apparition of the pontiff canceled on Wednesday and the worshipers forced to watch his catechism live.

Other Italian landmarks such as Piazza San Marco in Venice and the Milanese shopping streets have also remained empty today with tourists who are away and some countries cut off transport links.

He warned that the unprecedented national blockade in Italy could be further strengthened, with the request to completely close public transport in the Lombardy region.

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte today refused to rule out even tougher quarantine measures after the death toll rose to 631 on the first day of the blockade yesterday, with over 10,000 cases now confirmed.

Conte also promised today that Italy would increase spending to help the Italian economy resist the crisis, saying that 25 billion euros (£ 22 billion) had been set aside.

Keeping your distance: Pope Francis keeps his weekly audience live streaming in the Vatican - with his clerical translators keeping the recommended 3-foot distance while Italian quarantine measures reach the Holy See

Keeping your distance: Pope Francis keeps his weekly audience live streaming in the Vatican – with his clerical translators keeping the recommended 3-foot distance while Italian quarantine measures reach the Holy See

An empty road in Milan today on the second day of the unprecedented national blockade to face the coronavirus

An empty road in Milan today on the second day of the unprecedented national blockade to face the coronavirus

A health worker sprays a disinfectant on an otherwise deserted San Marco square in the overcrowded city of Venice

A health worker sprays a disinfectant on an otherwise deserted San Marco square in the overcrowded city of Venice

A woman looks towards St. Peter's Square and the Basilica behind it today after the usually popular tourist sites have been closed due to the coronavirus epidemic

A woman looks towards St. Peter’s Square and the Basilica behind it today after the usually popular tourist sites have been closed due to the coronavirus epidemic

A sparsely populated subway station in Milan today, with a man wearing a mask going down an escalator

A sparsely populated subway station in Milan today, with a man wearing a mask going down an escalator

The outdoor seating area of ​​a cafe in Milan is now deserted, with northern Italy the area most affected by the virus epidemic

The outdoor seating area of ​​a cafe in Milan is now deserted, with northern Italy the area most affected by the virus epidemic

Milan's famous shopping galleries were abandoned after the blockade, which started in Lombardy earlier than elsewhere

Milan’s famous shopping galleries were abandoned after the blockade, which started in Lombardy earlier than elsewhere

The widow is trapped with her husband’s body for two days after the quarantine

A widow was trapped in her home for two days with her husband’s corpse after the couple was quarantined for her diagnosis of coronavirus in Italy.

The woman, from Borghetto Santo Spirito, in north-west Italy, was reportedly seen crying for help from her balcony after her husband died around 2 am on Monday.

The man’s body, which tested positive for coronavirus, was left inside the apartment until it could be removed 48 hours after Wednesday’s death.

His widow was unable to leave her home because of “quarantine restrictions”, as the protocol stipulates that no one is allowed to approach the body, Mayor Giancarlo Canepa told CNN.

“Yes, it is true that it is still there with the body and we will not be able to remove it until Wednesday morning,” he added on Tuesday. “Unfortunately we have a security protocol which we must follow.”

Canepa added that the man refused to be taken to the hospital after testing positive for the COVID-19 test “otherwise it wouldn’t have happened.”

A neighbor told IVG.IT that the widow had been seen crying for help from her balcony after her husband died.

“Right now the most important thing is to think of this lady, alone with her husband’s body,” they said.

‘Nobody can come close to help or comfort her. Hopefully this will work out quickly. Our thoughts are with her and what she is experiencing. ‘

Last week the government said it would only take £ 6.6 billion, but the crisis has intensified dramatically since then and the blockade nationwide has frozen the country’s economy.

The precious Italian tourism sector has also been affected, with many countries and airlines that are blocking flights to Italy to stop the spread of the virus.

Landmarks including the Colosseum and the Leaning Tower of Pisa have been closed while Milan’s famous commercial galleries are almost deserted.

Stefano Ruggiero, 48, owner of a perfumery near the Ponte Vecchio in Florence, said that the business has been going on since 1911 but “this is the quietest road that has ever been”.

In the meantime, restaurants and bars have been ordered to close at 18:00 and can only open if they can maintain the required safety distance of 3 feet.

The tourism sector employs around one million people ahead of Easter, who now fear for their jobs.

Despite the economic impact, the head of the Lombardy region that includes Milan today urged the government to close transport and non-essential activities in an even narrower bloc.

Attilio Fontana said that he and 12 regional mayors have decided that further action is needed to stop the spiral spread of Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

“If the contagion continues to spread at this speed, the system will not be able to resist for much longer,” Fontana told the Corriere della Sera newspaper.

“We are really reaching the maximum limits,” he added on Sky TG24 television. “It is clear that the situation is approaching a dangerous moment.”

“Suspension of public transport should be considered because it is definitely a means by which the virus spreads,” he said.

The Rome government was due to review the request on Wednesday.

Conte said he will consider requests to tighten the blockade, but has issued a cautionary note with a warning that fighting infections should not be at the expense of civil liberties.

A map showing the latest virus cases worldwide, with Italy now recording the largest number of cases outside mainland China

A porch near the Doge's Palace in Venice is now deserted, except for a healthcare professional who sprays disinfectant

A porch near the Doge’s Palace in Venice is now deserted, except for a healthcare professional who sprays disinfectant

A jogger makes his way through the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II today, the centerpiece of Milan's famous shopping district

A jogger makes his way through the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II today, the centerpiece of Milan’s famous shopping district

A deserted square of San Marco in Venice, with the basilica on the right. Venice is facing an unusual shortage of tourists for the second time in months after the city was flooded last year

A deserted square of San Marco in Venice, with the basilica on the right. Venice is facing an unusual shortage of tourists for the second time in months after the city was flooded last year

A woman wearing a mask is now walking through a largely empty Porta Nuova business district in Milan amid requests for the closure of non-essential businesses due to the epidemic

A woman wearing a mask is now walking through a largely empty Porta Nuova business district in Milan amid requests for the closure of non-essential businesses due to the epidemic

An employee of the municipal company Veritas sprays disinfectant in one of the alleys that usually raises today in Venice

An employee of the municipal company Veritas sprays disinfectant in one of the alleys that usually raises today in Venice

A police officer checks the cars entering Milan last night with drastic new travel restrictions to stop the spread of the virus

A police officer checks the cars entering Milan last night with drastic new travel restrictions to stop the spread of the virus

The Trevi Fountain in Rome, in an area often full of tourists, has been abandoned since the beginning of the quarantine

The Trevi Fountain in Rome, in an area often full of tourists, has been abandoned since the beginning of the quarantine

Two people pushed the carts out of a supermarket in Corigliano-Rossano last night with some customers who refueled

Two people pushed the carts out of a supermarket in Corigliano-Rossano last night with some customers who refueled

In Rome, Pope Francis held his weekly general public in his private library today, with the public banished from St. Peter’s Square.

Francis, 83, sent special prayers for the prisoners, the sick, and the hospital staff who take care of them, taking his weekly catechism lesson via livestream rather than in person.

He was surrounded by a handful of priest translators who took turns commenting in a variety of languages, making sure to sit 3 feet apart.

The police have blocked access to St. Peter’s Basilica to anyone other than people trying to pray, as the Vatican is in line with Italy’s quarantine measures.

The pontiff himself is believed to have tested negative for the virus last week after having had a cold during an Ash Wednesday service.

The pope canceled a number of events because of his illness, triggering alarm after being portrayed while hugging and kissing worshipers in St. Peter’s Basilica. .

Francis generally enjoyed good health, although he removed part of a lung as a young man.

One person in Vatican City was infected, another who attended a Vatican conference proved positive and five people were placed in precautionary quarantine in the fortified city-state.

Staff are sitting behind an easyJet counter, a woman wearing a mask, at Milan Linate airport today - with many countries imposing restrictions on travel to and from Italy

Staff are sitting behind an easyJet counter, a woman wearing a mask, at Milan Linate airport today – with many countries imposing restrictions on travel to and from Italy

Pigeons are among the only signs of life in the usually popular Piazza del Duomo in Milan, with the cathedral behind it closed

Pigeons are among the only signs of life in the usually popular Piazza del Duomo in Milan, with the cathedral behind it closed

A nun wearing a protective mask today crosses Bernini's Colonnade which surrounds the closed Piazza San Pietro

A nun wearing a protective mask today crosses Bernini’s Colonnade which surrounds the closed Piazza San Pietro

The Italian soccer team Atalanta played their Champions League game against Valencia in front of an empty stadium last night

The Italian soccer team Atalanta played their Champions League game against Valencia in front of an empty stadium last night

Two people face a largely deserted Venice - a city that most commonly suffers from the opposite problem of overcrowding

Two people face a largely deserted Venice – a city that most commonly suffers from the opposite problem of overcrowding

Outside the Vatican walls, the central streets of Rome were deserted this morning and the buses that are usually full of commuters were empty.

Some supermarket shoppers started observing the 3-foot distance by forming spaced tails as they stock up for a long quarantine. Handshakes are also frowned upon.

“For the love and sense of responsibility towards Rome and all citizens, with enormous and profound disappointment, we decided to close to help the whole community,” said a sign in a restaurant in Rome.

“As soon as the emergency is over, we will organize a free carbonara day for doctors, nurses and health workers.”

Spain and Portugal suspended air traffic from Italy for two weeks while Austria ordered to stop flights and trains from its neighbor and Slovenia said it would impose checks on its border with the country.

British Airways canceled all of its Italian flights on Tuesday, while Air France and the low-cost airlines Ryanair, Easyjet and Wizz Air said they wanted to cancel flights from Italian airports until early April.

Air Canada has taken even more drastic measures, suspending flights to Italy until at least May 1st.

Australia said Wednesday it would ban foreign nationals who had been to Italy for the past 14 days – measures already in place for arrivals from China and South Korea.

Passengers today wear protective masks at the main airport of Rome Fiumicino, with many travel restrictions in place

Passengers today wear protective masks at the main airport of Rome Fiumicino, with many travel restrictions in place

The Colosseum in Rome, which usually lifts tourists and people trying to sell them, has been abandoned

The Colosseum in Rome, which usually lifts tourists and people trying to sell them, has been abandoned

St. Peter's Square was abandoned today with Pope Francis broadcasting his weekly audience through a Vatican live streaming

St. Peter’s Square was abandoned today with Pope Francis broadcasting his weekly audience through a Vatican live streaming

Pope Francis, believed to have tested negative for coronavirus last week, speaks today as seen on a Vatican screen

Pope Francis, believed to have tested negative for coronavirus last week, speaks today as seen on a Vatican screen

A municipal health worker wearing a protective suit and face masks sprays disinfectant on a barrier today in Venice

A municipal health worker wearing a protective suit and face masks sprays disinfectant on a barrier today in Venice

A man travels on a largely empty vaporetto in Venice, which is located in one of the severely affected northern regions of Italy

A man travels on a largely empty vaporetto in Venice, which is located in one of the severely affected northern regions of Italy

An empty shopping arcade was visited in Milan last night, with tourists staying away because of the coronavirus crisis

An empty shopping arcade was visited in Milan last night, with tourists staying away because of the coronavirus crisis

The masked police in Rome’s main train station were checking the travel reasons for the passengers and making sure everyone kept the recommended distance from each other.

But the departure board showed no cancellation. He said that when the station staff realized he wasn’t Italian, he was told, “Are you a foreigner? Go go! ‘ and greeted him with his hand.

The rail service to Venice via Florence was only sparsely occupied but still operated, without checks for passengers disembarking in Florence.

The Thello company canceled its night services between Paris and Venice, as well as the day trains between Milan and Marseille, until the beginning of April.

The French national railway company SNCF said Tuesday that it was “awaiting advice” on how to proceed with regard to services to Italy.

Since the end of February, the French staff of the SNCF cross-border trains have taken off before the Italian border and been replaced by Italian colleagues.

Some rail services between Italy and Austria were still in operation on Tuesday, but this is expected to change, according to a spokesman for the Austrian rail operator OeBB.

A spokesman for the German Deutsche Bahn said that the only service that connected it to Italy, between Munich and Venice, has been suspended.

Health workers at a roadblock in Brescia, northern Italy, where the epidemic has become one of the worst outside mainland China

Health workers at a roadblock in Brescia, northern Italy, where the epidemic has become one of the worst outside mainland China

The beds are placed in a checkpoint in Brescia, with a rapid increase in the number of people in intensive care

The beds are placed in a checkpoint in Brescia, with a rapid increase in the number of people in intensive care

As the crisis escalates, doctors have described how hospitals have been “overwhelmed” by the number of patients.

Doctors in Italy have been forced to make life or death decisions about who should receive intensive care, with cases of viruses accumulating across the country.

A doctor in northern Italy told a friend in the UK that hospitals were operating on “200% capacity” with operating rooms that quickly converted to intensive care units.

Non-coronavirus cases have been sidelined with some doctors who have received a ‘booklet’ and said they carry out specialist tasks for which they are not qualified, while some patients over the age of 65 have not even been evaluated, the doctor.

In addition, the medical staff themselves are becoming “sick and emotionally overwhelmed” and left “in tears” because it cannot prevent people from dying, they said.

In the meantime, the nurses have been left bruised by the constant use of the face mask and have collapsed on their benches from exhaustion while fighting the crisis.

A nurse, Alessia Bonari, published a photo of her injured face after wearing protective clothing for hours during a shift in Milan.

A doctor wearing a protective suit and a face mask works in a triage center in Brescia, in the Lombardy region which was the most affected by the crisis

A doctor wearing a protective suit and a face mask works in a triage center in Brescia, in the Lombardy region which was the most affected by the crisis

An X-ray image appears on a screen in a medical center in Brescia with many doctors and nurses working long hours due to the health crisis

An X-ray image appears on a screen in a medical center in Brescia with many doctors and nurses working long hours due to the health crisis

Doctors treat a patient in a hospital in Schiavonia, northern Italy, who was most affected by the coronavirus epidemic in the country

Doctors treat a patient in a hospital in Schiavonia, northern Italy, who was most affected by the coronavirus epidemic in the country

Health workers wearing protective suits, masks and gloves are pictured at work in the Amedeo di Savoia hospital in Turin

Health workers wearing protective suits, masks and gloves are pictured at work in the Amedeo di Savoia hospital in Turin

Describing life in the hospital, the nurse revealed how she couldn’t drink or go to the toilet for six hours after putting on her protective clothing.

“I fear because the mask may not adhere well to my face or I may have accidentally touched myself with dirty gloves,” he said.

‘I am physically tired because the protective devices are defective, the lab coat makes me sweat and once dressed I can no longer go to the bathroom or drink for six hours.

‘I am psychologically tired, as are all my colleagues who have been in the same condition for weeks.

The nurse also appealed to the Italians to obey the quarantine rules, saying: “I will continue to take care and take care of my patients, because I am proud and in love with my job.”

‘What I ask anyone who is reading this post is not to frustrate the effort we are making, to be selfless, to stay at home and therefore protect those who are most fragile.

‘We young people are not immune to coronavirus, we too can get sick or, worse still, we can get sick.

‘I can’t afford the luxury of going home in quarantine, I have to go to work and do my part. Do yours, I ask you please.

Another nurse, Elena Pagliarini, was photographed slumped on her desk while still wearing the mask in a Cremona hospital where she worked all day.

The nurse had fallen asleep while still wearing the mask and surgical gown with the Italian hospitals “overwhelmed” by the crisis.

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The Pope urges priests to visit coronavirus patients

Pope Francis today urged Catholic priests to visit people suffering from coronavirus despite the ban on traveling mostly to Italy.

Francis prayed that the priests “would have had the courage to go out and go to the sick” while celebrating Mass alone in the Vatican this morning.

The service in the chapel of Francis’ residence was streamed from the Vatican today, with the 83-year-old pontiff avoiding public meetings.

Italy has imposed new strict national quarantine rules, including a ban on most travel, but there are limited exceptions for “urgent” work and health reasons.

Pope Francis collects his thoughts during a mass streamed in his retirement at the Vatican today, which he celebrated alone

Pope Francis collects his thoughts during a mass streamed in his retirement at the Vatican today, which he celebrated alone

This morning the Pope celebrates Mass in an empty chapel, a week after the 83-year-old pontiff canceled a series of events on health fears

This morning the Pope celebrates Mass in an empty chapel, a week after the 83-year-old pontiff canceled a series of events on health fears

In his homily today, Francis prayed for the thousands of sick patients in Italy and for the doctors and nurses who take care of them.

‘We also pray to the Lord for our priests, so that they may have the courage to go out and go to the sick, bringing the strength of the word of God and the Eucharist and accompanying health workers and volunteers in this work they are doing, “said Francis .

His service today, held in the chapel of the pension of Santa Marta where he lives, arrived a few hours after Italy extended its quarantine measures to the whole country.

Traveling through Italy is allowed only for “urgent, verifiable work situations, emergencies or health reasons”, according to a decree signed by the Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte last night.

“Necessities” such as shopping are needed, but it is not clear whether a clerical visit belongs to that category.

People who want to travel will have to fill out a document explaining their reasons for doing it and take it with them.

If they are found to have lied, they face fines or terms of imprisonment, but restrictions will generally work on an honor system.

Public transportation will remain operational, but Conte says he wants as many people as possible to stay at home.

Francis lifts a communion wafer during his solitary mass in the Vatican this morning where he invited priests to visit coronavirus sufferers

Francis lifts a communion wafer during his solitary mass in the Vatican this morning where he invited priests to visit coronavirus sufferers

The pope leans towards the altar during today's mass in a chapel of the guesthouse of Santa Marta in the Vatican, where he lives

The pope leans towards the altar during today’s mass in a chapel of the guesthouse of Santa Marta in the Vatican, where he lives

Francis sits during Mass this morning in the Vatican, a city-state surrounded entirely by Italy that has imposed new and severe quarantine measures

Francis sits during Mass this morning in the Vatican, a city-state surrounded entirely by Italy that has imposed new and severe quarantine measures

The pope canceled a series of pledges last week after suffering from a cold during an Ash Wednesday service.

Fears were raised after Francesco was pictured embracing and kissing members of the public after speaking in a hoarse voice and blowing his nose in church.

However, the pontiff is thought to have tested negative for coronavirus last week.

Yesterday he resumed some private meetings, also with French bishops and two departing ambassadors.

Francis generally enjoyed good health, although he removed part of a lung as a young man.

The Vatican, which is surrounded by Rome, has imposed restrictions on the movement and contact of its staff in an attempt to contain the virus.

One person inside Vatican City has given positive results and five people who have come into contact with that person are in precautionary quarantine.

The Vatican Museums are also closed, including the Sistine Chapel, in another blow to the precious Italian tourism industry.

St. Peter’s Square, the centerpiece of the Vatican, was almost empty today with only a few dozen people walking, most without masks.

Italy has recorded 1,807 confirmed cases since Monday evening, for a national total of 9,172.

Italy’s death toll has also increased from 97 to 463 – most of whom are older people with previous ailments.

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The dissimulation of the Vatican archives will finally reveal the truth about “Hitler’s pope” | World news

A new light will be cast on one of the most controversial periods in Vatican history on Monday when the archives on Pope Pius XII – accused by critics of being a Nazi sympathizer – will not be sealed.

A year after Pope Francis announced the move, saying that “the church is not afraid of history”, the documents of the papacy of Pius XII, which began in 1939 on the brink of World War II and ended in 1958, will be opened, initially in a small number of scholars.

Pius XII’s critics accused him of keeping silent during the Holocaust, without ever publicly condemning the persecution and genocide of Jews and others. His defenders claim to have quietly encouraged convents and other Catholic institutions to hide thousands of Jews and that public criticism of the Nazis would have risked the lives of priests and nuns.

“The opening of the archives is decisive for the contemporary history of the church and the world,” said Cardinal José Tolentino Calaça de Mendonça, archivist and librarian of the Vatican last week.

Bishop Sergio Pagano, prefect of the Vatican Apostolic Archive, said that scholars should express a “historical judgment”. He added: “The good [that Pius did] it was so great that it will make the few shadows pale. “Evaluating the millions of pages in the archives would take several years, he said.

Over 150 people have applied to access the archives, although only 60 can be hosted in offices simultaneously. Among the first to view the documents will be representatives of the Jewish community of Rome and scholars of Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust museum and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

David Kertzer, an American expert on the relationship between the Catholic church and fascism, who will begin reviewing the newspapers this week, said there were “signs of nervousness” in the Vatican about what would emerge from the archives. The Vatican archives allegedly provided an “immense amount of fresh material from millions of pages,” he said Observer.

“On the big question, it’s clear: Pius XII never publicly criticized the Nazis for the mass murder they were committing against the Jews of Europe – and knew from the outset that a mass murder was taking place. Various clerics and others urged him to speak, and refused to do so.

“Although there are many testimonials showing that the church protected the Jews in Rome, when more than 1,000 were gathered on October 16, 1943 and kept for two days adjacent to the Vatican [before deportation to the death camps]Pio decided not to publicly protest or even to send an appeal to Hitler privately not to send them to death in Auschwitz. Hopefully what we will find from these archives is why he did what he did and what discussions took place behind the Vatican walls. “

Mary Vincent, professor of modern European history at Sheffield University, said that many criticisms of Pius Xll lacked nuance. “He was an attentive, austere and unpleasant man who tried to guide a path through almost impossible circumstances. He had a clear vision of what he considered the threat of Soviet communism and his vision of Italian fascism was somewhat softer. But classifying it as good or bad isn’t useful: it’s about the decisions he made and the space he had to make those decisions. “





Pope Pius XII in 1951.



Pius XII in 1951.

Pius – whose birth name was Eugenio Pacelli – was Vatican secretary of state under his predecessor, Pope Pius XI, and a former papal nuncio, or envoy, to Germany. In 1933, he negotiated a concordat between the Catholic church and Germany. After being elected pope, six months before the outbreak of the war, the Vatican maintained diplomatic relations with the Third Reich and the new pontiff refused to condemn the Nazi invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939.

In December 1942, Pius XII spoke in general terms of the suffering of the Jews, although he had known for several months about the Nazi extermination plans. In 1943 he wrote to the bishop of Berlin, claiming that the church could not publicly condemn the Holocaust for fear of causing “greater evils”.

Hitler Pope, a controversial biography of Pius XII by British author John Cornwell, published in 1999, stated that the pope was an anti-Semite who “was not taken out of moral outrage at the plight of the Jews.” He was also narcissistic and determined to protect and advance the power of the papacy, the book claimed. Pius XII was “the ideal pope for Hitler’s unspeakable plan. He was Hitler’s pledge. He was Hitler’s pope”.

Cornwell’s claims have been contested by some scholars and authors. He later admitted that Pius XII had “a field of action so small that it is impossible to judge the reasons for his silence during the war”, although the pontiff never explained his position.

In 2012, Yad Vashem changed the text of an exhibition on the papacy of Pius XII, from “did not intervene” to “did not publicly protest”. The new text acknowledged several assessments of the pope’s position and Yad Vashem said he “looks[ed] waiting for the day when the Vatican archives will be open to researchers so that we can arrive at a clearer understanding of the events “.

Pope Benedict, Francis’ predecessor, in 2009 declared that Pius XII had lived a life of “heroic” Christian virtue, a step towards possible holiness. But in 2014 Francis said that no miracle – a prerequisite for beatification, the last step towards canonization – had been identified. “If there are no miracles, he cannot go on. He is stuck there,” said Francis after visiting Yad Vashem. Last year, Francis said that Pius XII had led the church during one of the “saddest and darkest periods of the 20th century”. He added that he is confident that “serious and objective historical research will allow for evaluation [of Pius] in the correct light “, including” appropriate criticism “.

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Today in history, 11 February: Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin sign the Yalta agreement in 1945 | news

Today is Tuesday 11 February, the 42nd day of 2020. There are 324 days in the year.

Today’s highlight in history: on February 11, 1979, the followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (hoh-MAY’-nee) seized power in Iran.

In this date:

In 1531, the Church of England reluctantly accepted King Henry VIII as supreme head.

In 1861, President-elect Abraham Lincoln said goodbye to his adopted hometown of Springfield, Illinois as he headed to Washington for his inauguration.

A six-week strike against General Motors ended in 1937, with the company agreeing to recognize the United Automobile Workers Union.

In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin signed the Yalta agreement, in which Stalin agreed to declare war on imperial Japan following the capitulation of Nazi Germany.

In 1968, the fourth and current Madison Square Garden of New York City, located on the West Side of Manhattan on the site of what was once the Pennsylvania Station building, opened with a “Health for Use” hosted by Bob Hope and Bing Crosby . (The same evening, the New York Rangers played their last game in third Garden, tying the Detroit Red Wings 3-3.)

In 1975 Margaret Thatcher was elected leader of the British opposition conservative party.

In 1990, South African black activist Nelson Mandela was released after 27 years in captivity.

In 2008, the Pentagon accused Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (HAH’s shayk moh-HAH’-med) and five other inmates in Guantanamo Bay of murders and war crimes in connection with the September 11 attacks.

In 2011, Egypt exploded with joy after democratic demonstrators shot down President Hosni Mubarak, whose resignation ended three decades of authoritarian rule.

In 2012, pop singer Whitney Houston, 48, was found dead in the tub of a hotel room in Beverly Hills, California.

In 2013, with a few words in Latin, Pope Benedict XVI did what no pope had done in more than half a millennium: he announced his resignation. The bomb arrived during a routine morning meeting of the Vatican cardinals. (The 85-year-old pontiff was replaced by Pope Francis.)

In 2009, the All-Star short film Miguel Tejada pleaded guilty to lying to Congress on steroids in baseball. (He was sentenced to one year on probation.) Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., Who first went to Congress in 1955, became the longest serving member of the United States House of Representatives.

Ten years ago: former President Bill Clinton had inserted two stents into one of his heart arteries after being hospitalized in New York with chest pain. Iranian security forces unleashed an overwhelming blow against opposition protesters while President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhahd) used the 31st anniversary of the Islamic revolution to challenge the West. British designer Alexander McQueen, 40, was found dead in his London home.

Five years ago: swearing that Islamic State forces “were about to lose”, President Barack Obama urged Congress to authorize military action, excluding large-scale combat operations in the United States reminiscent of Iraq and Iraq. Afghanistan. Little League International deprived Jackie Robinson West of the national title after an investigation revealed that it had falsified the boundaries to field unsuitable players; Mountain Ridge Little League was awarded the title. Longtime CBS News correspondent Bob Simon, 73, was killed in a car accident in New York. Hall of Fame basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian, 84, died in Las Vegas.

A year ago: Congress negotiators reached an agreement to prevent a government shutdown and finance the construction of new barriers along the border between the United States and Mexico. Freshman Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota apologized for tweets suggesting that members of Congress support Israel because they get paid to do so; the tweets had brought bipartisan criticism. Robert Bowers, accused of killing 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue, has pleaded not guilty to hating crimes and dozens of other counts. The Denver teachers began to strike for the first time in 25 years following failed negotiations with the school district on basic pay; schools remained open with administrators and substitute teachers in the classrooms. As baseball’s Oakland Athletics began spring training, the choice of first-round Kyler Murray announced that he would pursue a career in the NFL rather than in baseball; Murray had won the college football Heisman Trophy in Oklahoma.

Today’s birthdays: actor Conrad Janis is 92 years old. Gospel singer Jimmy Carter is 88 years old. Stylist Mary Quant is 86 years old. Actress Tina Louise is 82 years old. Band leader Sergio Mendes is 79 years old. Philip Anglim is 68 years old. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush is 67 years old. Actress Catherine Hickland is 64 years old. Rock musician David Uosikkinen (aw-SIK’-ken-ihn) (The Hooters) is 64 years old. Actress Carey Lowell is 59 years old. Singer Sheryl Crow is 58 years old. Former Alaskan governor Sarah Palin is 56 years old. Actress Jennifer Aniston is 51 years old. Damian Lewis is 49. The actress Marisa Petroro is 48 years old. The singer D’Angelo is 46 years old. Actor Brice Beckham is 44 years old. Mike Shinoda (rock singer / rock singer) is 43 years old. Singer-actress Brandy is 41 years old. musician Jon Jones (The Eli Young Band) is 40 years old. Actor Matthew Lawrence is 40 years old. Rhythmic and blues singer Kelly Rowland is 39 years old. Actress Natalie Dormer is 38 years old. Aubrey O’Day is 36. Actress Q’orianka (kohr- ee-AHN’-kuh) Kilcher is 30 years old. Actor Taylor Lautner is 28 years old.

Designed for today: “We would do better to live as we think, otherwise we will end up thinking how we lived”. – Paul Bourget, French author (1852-1935).

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