Corona virus: how does online pandemic dating work?

WORLD: Dating apps like Tinder and Bumble, but also partner exchanges like ElitePartner, have seen significantly increased activity since the beginning of the Corona crisis. There are 20 percent more chats worldwide on Tinder, which are also significantly longer. Bumble reports around 70 percent more video calls in March. Apps are the new way out – and virus-free as long as you stay good.

Johanna Degen: The corona crisis shows that a pandemic does not mean that you have to delete dating apps, on the contrary. If Tinder were just an app for sex, there wouldn’t be that many there now. This is now proving – contrary to many prejudices. Even before Covid-19, psychological research showed that Tinder users have complex, often deep motives, wishes and hopes. This is now confirmed, physical meetings are not possible, but online dating is booming, or rather “chat dating”. There are very different motives and causes: Environmental fear, loneliness, boredom and reflections: How do I want to live when the going gets tough, and with whom? When too high demands prevent love

WORLD: Tinder regularly sends WHO warnings to its users. In addition to advice such as “Stay home” and “Be safe”, emoticons such as the hand-washing emoji or sexting symbols such as eggplants and peaches are also sent. And since the pandemic started, users have sent almost four times as many “Dick Pics”. What role does the virus currently play on Tinder – and which is flirting?

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Valentine’s Day: How do you become successful on Tinder?

S“Swiping” has been cultivated in the dating world for eight years: the dating app Tinder was launched in 2012, since then around 57 million people worldwide have registered, 20 billion “matches” took place. Today there are successful figures like 20 percent of all marriages that are said to have come about thanks to Tinder. Register, swipe candidates to the right, chat, date, fall in love – in reality, what sounds simple is a long way off.

Because although we all want to be loved for our uniqueness, there is a huge discrepancy on Tinder: Most people present themselves less individually, so that they are more likely to please and “match” with many. The Flensburg psychologist Johanna Degen found out by interviewing Tinder users from Germany with her doctoral mother Andrea Kleeberg-Niepage. Degen explains in an interview why the dating app is a double-edged sword.

WORLD: Sex or love, what do you think Tinder users are really looking for?

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