Cured Covid-19: “As if you were touching your marrow with a trowel”

They drooled. Sweat. Coughed. Sometimes kept a log of their symptoms. They managed their fear or considered making a will. But they survived. With or without antibiotics. With or without the famous chloroquine of which the Marseille professor Didier Raoult extols the merits. “98% of people recover”, recalls Jérôme Salomon, the director general of health who, since March 17, gives every day the number of Covid-19 patients discharged from the hospital, while comforting the litany of deaths (Wednesday evening, there were nearly 31 000 “cured” discharged from hospital). With data from the hospital environment, “We must add the probable tens of thousands of cured people in town“, Underlines the general direction of health.

Are these survivors now immune? If yes, for how long? The question remains thorny (read page 6-7). Have they all been really infected with the virus? If some have been tested, many have had to rely on a diag

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

1 €
for 2 months

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Pierre-Henri Allain in Rennes

,


Stéphanie Maurice in Lille

,


Catherine Mallaval

,


Stéphanie Aubert in Marseille

,


François Carrel in Grenoble

,


Gilles Dhers

,


Stéphanie Harounyan in Marseille

,


Guillaume Tion

,


Tania Kahn

,


Juliette Deborde

,


Jérôme Lefilliâtre

,


Guillaume Krempp in Strasbourg

.

Coronavirus: what are the implications for cancer patients?

Grandstand. With the coronavirus, we are living much more than a health crisis. It is also a test of resistance for our health systems, even for the countries considered as “best ranked” by the various evaluation institutes or bodies. The indicators used, such as economic performance criteria, minimization of the cost of production, satisfaction of a standard of equity specific to each company, now appear to be poorly calibrated and insufficient in the face of such an epidemic crisis. As this pandemic progresses, we understand less the absence of indicators relating to the conditions of practice of those who provide care and to their dedication.

The fight against Covid-19 goes beyond a fight against the epidemic. It is also a struggle to maintain care for other chronic or acute pathologies that have not disappeared during this epidemic period. No one can also conceal the social and economic consequences, possible obstacles to access to care for all. An estimated 3.5 million French people are affected by cancer in France and 382,000 new annual cases in 2018, i.e. around 1,450 new cases diagnosed every day of the week. The Minister of Solidarity and Health regretted that cancer screenings were no longer carried out, “Calling the French” to return to their doctor for these diagnostic procedures. This announcement is important but may not be sufficient or essential to avoid the potential serious consequences of delayed or unannounced diagnoses, treatments degraded by necessity, renunciations of care or the interruption of inclusions in therapeutic trials.

A national strategy to be implemented

It would now be necessary to quickly implement a coordinated national strategy with a coherent territorial variation adapted to the local epidemiological and health situation, even when efforts are made to limit the spread of the virus by containment and barrier measures. The paradox of our society overdone with inflationary regulations and saturated with organizations of all kinds, but which ultimately finds it very difficult to organize or impose cooperation in this unprecedented context. Yet we have entered a period when things that once seemed impossible are inevitable.

Read also “My confinement started in January, when the pain put me in bed”

Since the epidemic crisis and the post-containment period are expected to last several months, the fear of the medical community with which I associate and of the nursing staff of my establishment specialized in the fight against cancer is that we are faced with a first “wave” of more serious cases than before linked to deferred care. After this period of crisis, the duration of which no one can seriously determine, health facilities that have been under tension for many years may find it difficult, especially if they have been considered as “Covid-19 hospitals”, to be absorbed into reasonable times the care of patients awaiting treatment as well as the flow of patients with newly diagnosed cancer reintegrating a course of care. It will most certainly take months to restore optimal organization. In addition, even if the epidemic crisis ends, the deterioration of the economy could accentuate inequalities with all its consequences on access to healthcare, particularly in the case of cancer.

Towards an increase in mortality?

For breast cancer, the most frequent cancer in women, whose annual number of new cases is estimated at 54,000 in France, the surgical management of patients with favorable prognostic criteria has been postponed, in accordance with the opinion of the High Council of Public Health available from mid-March and on the recommendations of learned societies. Even if these are remarkable recommendations which are unanimous during this period, it should not be forgotten that these are expert agreements for degraded care which should not last, at the risk a loss of luck for patients with even cancer said to have a good prognosis. Other examples could be taken, such as pancreatic cancer, the incidence of which has more than doubled over the past twenty years and whose unfavorable prognosis means that any delay in diagnosis by limiting access to radiology services, that any delay in surgical management due to the absence of an available operating theater or access to post-operative resuscitation could inevitably lead to an increase in mortality.

The Lombardy region of Italy, very affected as everyone knows by the pandemic, has managed to organize itself to maintain adequate care for cancer patients during this epidemic plague. Several platforms (HUB centers) have been set up, dedicated solely to the treatment of cancer patients (including the European Institute of Oncology and the National Cancer Institute in Milan). They receive newly diagnosed surgical candidates from area hospitals more dedicated to treating Covid-19 patients. These Covid-19-free cancer hospitals can continue to care for cancer patients even if they are small cancers with good prognosis.

This attention-grabbing pandemic should not make us lose our minds. After having wagered on economic performance for years, we suddenly moved on to the almost exclusive total fight against the Covid-19. It must be remembered that there is a middle way in everything that avoids extreme attitudes while preserving the future.


Emmanuel Barranger Surgeon oncologist, director general of the Center for the fight against cancer Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (Fédération Unicancer)

.

Diary of a doctor in Ehpad: “In the night, unexpected death is hard”

On the front line with the elderly, Jean-Paul Duplan, 69, is the coordinating doctor of two accommodation establishments for dependent elderly people (Ehpad) in the department of Essonne.

For request of Release, he keeps a logbook of his daily work in the face of the coronavirus. The fight is tough.

This article is the updated version of the logbook published in its first version in the edition of Release April 4-5.

March 25

For how long ?

“Four of the six tests I managed to do came back positive! Now is the time to implement the program that we had defined as a team. Dedicated area set up in the morning of March 23, with a nurse, a nursing assistant, FFP2 protective masks, a disposable gown and overcoats (keep stocks up to date). Contain all residents in their rooms as of today. For how long ? Some have been asking for it for several days, without realizing

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

1 €
for 2 months

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Sylvain Mouillard

.

Shortages extend to drugs

Faced with the unprecedented scale of the crisis and the influx of patients, stocks are running out. First those of protective masks. Then reagents used in diagnostic tests from Covid-19. And the respirators, whose production is struggling to keep up with demand. Little by little, everything necessary for hospitalization and treatment of patients is running out. Even the most common equipment, the most common drugs.

“Hospital stocks of muscle relaxants, sedatives and painkillers are consumed quickly”, is alarmed by the European Alliance of European University Hospitals, and “At their current rate of consumption, stocks will be empty within a few days in the hospitals hardest hit, and within two weeks for those with the largest reserves.” In their press release published on Tuesday, forty doctors and directors of establishments in France and other European countries call their respective leaders to coll

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

€ 8 /
month

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Camille Gévaudan

.

Resuscitation drugs: “We fear a shortage of stocks”

Damien Roux, university professor and hospital practitioner of intensive resuscitation medicine, works in the medical and surgical resuscitation department of Louis-Mourier Hospital (AP-HP), located in Colombes, in the Hauts-de-Seine. As of last weekend, this doctor was responsible for reflecting – in collaboration with other colleagues from the Public Assistance taking care of Covid-19 patients – on the means of optimizing the use of drugs in the services of resuscitation, due to the ever increasing number of serious patients. “The aim was to anticipate the overconsumption of certain drugs in the same way that we have been trying to increase the number of nurses for the past month»He explains. Except that a week later, the fear of an imminent shortage of certain molecules became a reality in Ile-de-France. “Despite our prospects and our vigilance on the issue, it is clear that suppliers and manufacturers are no longer able to monitor the consumption of drugs or certain medical devices in our hospitals.He warns.

AP-HP Director General Martin Hirsch acknowledged at a press conference on Friday that “stocks are very short on certain drugs.“This Saturday evening, it’s Edouard Philippe who admits the existence of”supply tensions here and there” “We regulate them by ensuring the circulation of these products throughout the territory, because there are stocks. We guarantee it by making sure to encourage increased domestic and global productionAdded the Prime Minister. Update with Professor Roux.

What is the situation of Louis-Mourier resuscitation service today?

We fear the beginning of a stock shortage for the end of the weekend. We have visibility over two days. That is to say, we are not sure that our internal pharmacy will be able to supply us with all of the drugs necessary for optimal patient management. There is great concern because it is very likely that the AP-HP central pharmacy, despite all its efforts, may not be able to meet the demands of all hospitals and that we will end up with shortages during the restocking. This shortage situation is new but ultimately quite logical. Instead of having a variety of patients who require very different treatments, resuscitation services are currently finding themselves with a majority of Covid + patients who need the same molecules. It is this quantity of identical patients, hitherto unknown in our units, which causes the drug shortage.

Which families of molecules are likely to be lacking?

There is a strong tension on hypnotics. These are the molecules we use to keep patients in sleep in intensive care. The equation is therefore simple: if we run out of stocks, we will no longer be able to take care of new patients. It’s a real danger. We also fear a rapid shortage of curares, which allow the patient, once asleep, to prevent him from moving and therefore consume less oxygen. Curares are necessary because they allow these patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to be completely ventilated by the ventilator. The last other concern concerns antibiotics. As we speak, I do not believe that an AP-HP hospital is lacking. But there is a risk of overconsumption in the days and weeks to come, because these serious patients in intensive care are at high risk of nosocomial infection. As you can see, the supply of these three groups of molecules is essential to save lives.

Your working group’s mission was to think of new protocols to save your stocks. A summary of your recommendations is currently being sent to all AP-HP hospitals. What does it contain?

At this stage, we propose an optimization of the sedation protocols in order to limit any use which is not absolutely necessary. A close relationship between the pharmacy and the resuscitation service is also necessary in order to anticipate any shortage of a molecule to refer to another close molecule. We also underlined the interest of associating other molecules making it possible to reduce the quantity of usual molecules to be administered. More specifically for sedation, one of the recommendations would also be to use the usual method of anesthesia in the operating room. It is a procedure that uses halogenated gases to put people to sleep and that we never use in most resuscitation services. This technique would also limit the use of curares.

At Louis-Mourier Hospital, where are you with your stock of syringe pumps, which allow the infusion of treatments? Some hospital structures already seem to be lacking…

We did the drawer bottoms and requisitioned all the units a little to find as many as possible. But indeed, faced with the impressive influx of resuscitation patients, we had to resolve to work with fewer electric syringe pumps per patient. For the moment, it does not degrade the quality of care but it causes discomfort in work for nurses who must regularly move this type of equipment from one room to another. Unless suppliers, especially Chinese, can quickly send us a large quantity of electric syringe pumps, we will have to modify the way we administer treatments to patients using less precise techniques.


Anaïs Moran

.

Chloroquine, the presumption of antidote – Release

We only talk about her, we believe strongly. And in this second week of general confinement, while France now has 860 dead (186 more in twenty-four hours) and more than 2,000 patients in intensive care, chloroquine is on the verge of being presented as the miracle cure against the coronavirus, and the grumpy would delay its distribution guilty as the massacre continues. Thus, all this weekend and again Monday, definitive declarations have multiplied on this molecule widely used around the world for fifty years for its antimalarial virtues, as well as for the treatment of autoimmune diseases like lupus or polyarthritis rheumatoid. The boss of LR senators, Bruno Retailleau, on Sunday urged the government not to “Fall behind” and prescribe the drug “In a hospital environment”. The mayor of Nice, Christian Estrosi (LR), himself infected with the coronavirus, said the same day that he had “Want that

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

€ 8 /
month

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Eric Favereau

,


Checknews Service

.

A resuscitation doctor: “It’s the start of the war”

Marc Amouretti, 32, is a doctor in the intensive care unit at Louis Mourier Hospital in Colombes (Hauts-de-Seine), an establishment dependent on the Public Assistance of Paris Hospitals (AP-HP). In the front line facing the Coronavirus epidemic, he tells Release his daily life and how his service is organized to cope.

Read also More than 7,000 dead worldwide, help for companies… update on the coronavirus

“The Covid-19 becomes a reality for more than a week. We are now going beyond the “anecdotal” cases linked to a few well-established clusters, where we could almost trace the chains of contamination from one family member to another. From now on, the cases are multiplying, in more or less serious forms, and occupy an increasing part of the resuscitation beds. This pushes us to rethink our organization every day to optimize patient care, and in particular to ensure that those who do not have the coronavirus are not

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

€ 8 /
month

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Sylvain Mouillard

.

Coronavirus from A to Z – Release

like animal

The World Health Organization (WHO) reminded him as early as January 12: “The data seem to clearly indicate that the outbreak is associated with exposures at a fish market in Wuhan” (see: Hubei). The hypothesis of a zoonosis, a disease transmitted by animals, is therefore preferred. February 7, the scientific journal Nature asks: “Has the pangolin spread the coronavirus to humans”? But nothing yet formally attests to this. Since there is nothing to certify that Sars-CoV-2, another name for Covid-19, very close to a virus detected in bats, comes from animals. The SARS coronavirus was transmitted from the civet to humans in China in 2002 and that of the Dromedary Sea to humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

as a balance sheet

As of Wednesday, almost two months after the virus appeared, 81,191 cases have been confirmed, including 78,064 in China. 39 countries have known or are experiencing cases. 2,728 people died, 30,310 were treated

Liberation reserves this article for its subscribers
To continue reading, subscribe

devices-picture

8 € /
month

100% digital offer

Do you already have a subscribed account?

I connect

  • All our articles in
    unlimited
  • The newspaper in version
                  digital
    the day of its publication
  • Our newsletters
    exclusive
  • RaJeux, our app from
                  games


Christian Losson

,


Catherine Mallaval

.