Home » Health » Washington State 37-year-old woman who had a mild coronavirus case says the first symptoms were headaches

Washington State 37-year-old woman who had a mild coronavirus case says the first symptoms were headaches

A Washington woman who recovered from the coronavirus novel claims she hadn’t had a cough or sneeze unlike many others diagnosed with the disease and claims that she recovered by staying at home and taking over-the-counter medicines.

Elizabeth Schneider lives in Seattle, the largest city in Washington state, which has the highest number of deaths in the United States from the disease that is sweeping the globe, began to experience flu-like symptoms on February 25, three days later. going to a party that was later identified as the location where five other people were also infected.

That day the 37-year-old, who has a PhD in bioengineering, “I woke up and felt tired, but it was nothing more than what you normally feel when you have to get up and go to work.”

He did not suspect he had the virus since it had been occupied the week before, but at noon he experienced headaches, along with fever and muscle pain.

Elizabeth Schneider lives in Seattle and started showing flu-like symptoms on February 25, three days after going to a party where at least five other people were infected with the coronavirus.

She woke up

She woke up “feeling tired” and at midday she felt a headache, along with fever and muscle pain, so she left her job to go home. Elizabeth Schneider (pictured outside her home in Seattle) thought she “definitely” didn’t have the virus. He took over-the-counter medicine to recover

A map shows the latest number of confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths in the United States and how COVID-19 has increased since January

A map shows the latest number of confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths in the United States and how COVID-19 has increased since January

He decided to leave the office of the biotechnology company where he works as a marketing manager and returned home.

After waking up from a nap, Schneider found that she had a high temperature, which peaked at 103 degrees Fahrenheit that night (39.4 degrees Celsius).

“And at that point, I started to shiver uncontrollably, and I had chills and tingling in the extremities, so it was a little worrying,” he said.

She turned to over-the-counter flu drugs to treat the symptoms and called a friend on stand-by in case she needed to be taken to an emergency room – but the fever started to recede in the next few days.

Schneider was following the news on the coronavirus novel. The first American case was discovered in Washington in late January.

Since then the state has become the epicenter of the disease in the country, with over 260 cases and at least two dozen deaths. Nationally, there have been over 1,100 cases and 30 deaths.

Since he didn’t have the most common symptoms like coughing or wheezing, “I thought, okay, well, that’s definitely why I don’t have coronavirus,” said Schneider.

After waking up from a nap, Schneider found that she had a high temperature, which peaked at 103 degrees Fahrenheit that night (39.4 degrees Celsius).

After waking up from a nap, Schneider found that she had a high temperature, which peaked at 103 degrees Fahrenheit that night (39.4 degrees Celsius). “And at that point, I started to shiver uncontrollably, and I had chills and tingling in the extremities,” he explained

Because he didn't have the most common COVID-19 symptoms like coughing or shortness of breath. He turned to over-the-counter flu medications to treat the symptoms and called a friend on standby in case he needed to be taken to an emergency room.

Because he didn’t have the most common COVID-19 symptoms like coughing or shortness of breath. He turned to over-the-counter flu medications to treat the symptoms and called a friend on standby in case he needed to be taken to an emergency room.

She had undergone a flu shot but thought her disease was a different variety. A visit to the doctor would only involve being asked to go home, rest and drink lots of fluids.

A few days later, however, she discovered through a friend’s post that several people in the group had developed similar symptoms and started to become more suspicious.

Many of these people went to their doctors, where they were found negative for the flu, but coronavirus tests were not offered because they too did not cough or have breathing problems.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF CORONAVIRUS?

Like other coronaviruses, including those that cause common cold and triggered SARS, COVID-19 is a respiratory disease.

  • The most common symptoms are:
  • Temperature
  • Dry cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficult breathing
  • fatigue

Although having a runny nose doesn’t rule out coronavirus, so far it doesn’t seem to be a primary symptom.

Most people only become slightly ill, but the infection can become serious and even fatal, especially for those who are older or have underlying health conditions.

In these cases, patients develop pneumonia, which can cause:

  • Potentially with yellow, green or bleeding mucus
  • Fever, sweating and shivering tremors
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid or shallow breathing
  • Pain when breathing, especially when breathing deeply or coughing
  • Low appetite, energy and fatigue
  • Nausea and vomiting (most common in children)
  • Confusion (more common in older people)
  • Some patients also reported diarrhea and kidney failure was occasionally a complication.

Avoid people with these symptoms. If you develop them, call your doctor before going to the hospital or doctor, so they and you can prepare to minimize possible exposure if they suspect you have coronavirus.

Knowing that she would likely be rejected for the test, she decided to enroll in a research program called the Seattle Flu Study, hoping it could provide an answer. The team behind the study sent her a nasal swab kit, which she mailed and waited several days.

“On Saturday I finally got a call from one of the research coordinators (March 7), telling me that” You tested positive for the COVID-19 test, “he said.

“I was a little pleasantly surprised because I thought it was a little cold,” admitted Schneider with a laugh, although her mother cried when she said it.

“Of course, I probably wouldn’t have felt this way if I was seriously ill,” he said. ‘But from the point of view of scientific curiosity, I thought it was very interesting. And also the fact that I finally got the confirmation that it was what I had. ‘

By this point, her symptoms had already subsided and local health authorities told her to stay home for at least seven days after the onset of symptoms or 72 hours after they disappeared.

A week has passed since she felt better. He started running errands but is still avoiding large meetings and continues to work from home.

This week, U.S. health authorities citing Chinese data said 80% of cases were mild, while the remaining serious cases requiring hospitalization mainly involved people over 60 and people with conditions such as diabetes , heart disease or lung disease.

Thursday evening there were 1,540 confirmed coronavirus cases and 39 deaths in the United States.

He said he was sharing his story “to give people some hope” through his relatively mild experience with the infection, which he treated from home.

Schneider said he hopes his example, which will likely be typical of most cases, will comfort others.

But, he added, “obviously, it’s not something completely casual, because there are many people who are older or have underlying health conditions.

“This means that we must be very careful to stay home, isolating ourselves from others.”

“The message is not panic,” said Schneider. ‘If you think you have it, you probably do; you should probably be tested. “

“If your symptoms aren’t life threatening, just stay home, meditate with over-the-counter medicines, drink plenty of water, get plenty of rest, and check out the shows you want to watch,” he said.

CDC: HOW TO SLOW DOWN THE CORONAVIRUS CROWN

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