Zombies attack Trump in Cannes

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The competition for Palm of Gold It starts with brio and rebellion. The American Jim Jarmusch
has opened the struggle in the Official Section of the Festival of Cannes with a film, The dead do not die, that has everything: zombies, black mood, tributes to the cinema, self-references through allusions of the actors to the film itself and, as a depth load, a satirical and clear political discourse against the current world order, extreme consumerism and the negationism of climate change.

With
Bill Murray, Adam Driver
Y
Tilda Swinton
in the main roles, it was an incisive start to the party after the Mexican filmmaker Alejandro González Iñárritu had presented himself as the president of the jury – the first Latin American – with a harsh intervention against the politics of
Donald Trump
and other friendly friends of walls and exclusions.





American actor and model Luka Sabbat; the American actor Bill Murray; the British actress Tilda Swinton; American filmmaker Jim Jarmusch and American filmmaker Sara Driver pose for the media during the premiere of the film 'The dead do not die'.

American actor and model Luka Sabbat; the American actor Bill Murray; the British actress Tilda Swinton; American filmmaker Jim Jarmusch and American filmmaker Sara Driver pose for the media during the premiere of the film 'The dead do not die'.
(Ian Langsdon / EFE)

Jarmusch's film is obviously thinner in political matters. In it, the dog of the most despicable inhabitant of the town where the story takes place, a miserable farmer played effectively Steve Buscemi, is named Rumsfeld, the last name of the ultraconservative former Secretary of Defense and promoter of the invasion of Iraq with George W. Bush, Donald Rumsfeld It is worth the information to get an idea of ​​the tone of a tape where the undead who have suddenly awakened in the quiet village of Centerville will go for a mobile, a toy or a Snickers bar; who roam the streets asking for "wifi, wifi", a Pepsi or, in cases of greater austerity such as the zombie Iggy Pop, his partner and some other old rocker, are satisfied with a guitar or "coffee, coffee."


The undead of Jarmusch are a burden those who deny climate change

The collective resurrection of Centerville loved ones of all epochs comes when the earth comes out of its axis of rotation because of the fracture of large masses of ice at the poles. A disaster that the authorities consider exaggerated rumors as much as all the media give the news and the catastrophe is already a fact. When the characters hear the official denials, they do not even bother to comment on them. They put on a poker face and exchanged glances that make clear the degree of credibility they give to their leaders.





Jarmusch not only laughs at those who rule and more have contributed to build "a world of shit" -as a character says-, but of every living creature, not living and half-pensioner. The director also projects the irony and skepticism towards the interior of the film itself. The cops incarnated by Driver and Murray comment on the script and on several occasions refer to the piece of music that gives title to the film, the work of John Sturgill Simpson, whose country music the filmmaker must adore.





The film is full of quotes to films of all genres, from Nosferatu until Star Wars going by Encounters in the Third Phase or The Lord of the rings. And there is an explicit mention to George Romero, the New York filmmaker who died two years ago, to whom the current archetype of zombies in cinema and its use as a vehicle of social criticism is due. Not in vain the general delegate of the Festival of Cannes, Thierry Frémaux advanced in his appearance on Monday that the work of Jarmusch was among other things "a tribute to Romero".





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