Fitness: Do more sport now – but with the right strategy!

Klug planned, fixed training times work best for the implementation of your projects. You shouldn’t constantly ask yourself if you feel like it right now. Just get started. The time is planned, do not think too much, what should happen. If you have taken the first step, half is almost done. For many, it works best when training is on the weekend, then more, smaller workouts in the middle of the week. Keep this up for a month and you will soon see that you can no longer let it go. Your training routine will run smoothly.

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Where to report non-payment of sick days and unsafe working conditions? – Telemundo New York (47)

The new coronavirus, officially called COVID-19, spreads from person to person through droplets of saliva ejected by coughing, sneezing and talking, according to the latest CDC findings.

The virus can also be spread by contacting a contaminated surface or object and then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued an updated guide for workplaces and employees to avoid exposure to the virus.

This is the information from the OSHA headquarters in the tri-state area:

Region 1- Boston Regional Office

(CT *, ME *, MA, NH, RI, VT *)

JFK Federal Building

25 New Sudbury Street, Room E340

Boston, MA 02203

(617) 565-9860 (617) 565-9827 Fax

Region 2- New York Regional Office

(NJ *, NY *, PR *, VI *)

Federal Building

201 Varick Street, Room 670

New York, NY 10014

(212) 337-2378 (212) 337-2371 Fax

FILE COMPLAINTS WITHOUT WANTING TO PAY DAYS OF ILLNESS

While OSHA ensures that workplaces are safe, it is the Department of Labor and state attorneys general that enforce sick day pay.

You can file a complaint for any of the following reasons:

  • If you are forced to work in a non-essential business.
  • You work in an essential business, but do not perform essential functions.
  • Your employer requires you to report to the place of employment when your job can be done from home.
  • Your employer does not follow health and safety requirements
  • You fear because you are over 70 and / or have an underlying disease.
  • Your employer has not paid you wages due for hours worked, sick leave, or time off.
  • Your employer threatens or has already fired you for reasons related to COVID-19.
  • You meet the requirements for COVID-19 Paid Sick Leave and your employer refuses to pay it
  • His employer forces him to work while he is sick.

NEW YORK

HERE you will find the form of the State Attorney to file a complaint for non-payment of sick days or any other related work matter.

You can also call 311 or visit the website of the work Department in Spanish for more information.

NEW JERSEY

HERE you will find the guide of sick days paid in Spanish.

In this link you will find the form in Spanish for unpaid wages.

You can send it by post to

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Division of Wage and Hour Compliance

P.O. Box 389

Trenton, NJ 08625-0389

Or by fax to (609) 695-1174.

You can also submit it online HERE.

For more information in Spanish open here

CONNECTICUT

You can file a complaint in Spanish and online HERE.

HERE You will find the guide in Spanish on paid sick days.

You can also call the Wage and Workplace Standards Division at (860) 263-6790 or the Program Policy Office at (860) 263-6755.

OSHA REQUIREMENTS

Employers of workers at increased risk of contagion should follow the following preventive measures, OSHA requires:

  • Assess the hazards to which workers may be exposed.
  • Assess the risk of exposure.
  • Select, implement, and ensure workers are taking protective measures to prevent exposure, including the use of physical barriers (face masks, latex gloves, face shield, coveralls) to stop the spread of
  • Germs
  • Limiting social contact and the use of appropriate personal protective equipment are required.

OSHA requires workplaces:

  • Encourage workers to stay home if they are sick.
  • Require workers to cover themselves when coughing or sneezing.
  • Provide a place to wash hands as well as hand wipes containing
  • minus 60% alcohol.
  • Limit access to the workplace to only essential personnel, if possible.
  • Establish flexibility for the workplace (work from home) and the
  • working hours (staggered work shifts) as soon as possible.
  • Discourage workers from using phones, desks, or other
  • tools and work equipment of your colleagues.
  • Frequently clean and disinfect surfaces, equipment and other items in the work environment.
  • Using cleaning chemicals with disinfectant labels approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for the use of all cleaning and disinfection products.
  • Encourage workers to voice any concerns about occupational safety and health.

FOLLOW EXISTING OSHA STANDARDS

Although there is no OSHA standard that specifically covers exposure to SARS-CoV-2, some requirements may apply to prevent exposure in the workplace. Among the most relevant are:

  • OSHA standards for respiratory protective equipment (PPE) (in general industry, 29 CFR 1910 Subpart I), which require the use of gloves, eye and face protection, and respiratory protection. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.
  • When masks are necessary to protect workers or when employers require their use, employers must implement a comprehensive protection program in accordance with the respiratory protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134). MORE HERE.
  • The General Duty Clause, Section 5 (a) (1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, 29 USC 654 (a) (1), requires employers to provide every worker with “a job and workplace that is free from recognized risks that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm. ” COMPLETE INFORMATION HERE.

CLASSIFYING WORKERS ‘EXPOSURE TO SARS-COV-2

Workers’ risk from occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, during an outbreak could range from very high risk to high, medium, or low (caution). The level of risk depends in part on the type of industry, the need for contact with less than 6 feet of people known or suspected to be infected with SARS-CoV-2, or the requirement for repeated or prolonged contact with people. known or suspected to be infected with SARS-CoV-2.

To help employers determine appropriate precautions, OSHA has divided job duties into four levels of risk exposure: very high, high, medium, and low.

The Occupational Risk Pyramid displays the four levels of risk exposure in the form of a pyramid to represent the likely distribution of risk. Most American workers are likely to be at low (precautionary) or medium exposure risk levels. MORE INFORMATION HERE.

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Officials: 646 confirmed coronavirus cases in Massachusetts, 5 dead | news

BOSTON (WGGB / WSHM) – State officials have released new information regarding coronavirus cases in the Bay State.

Mass. The Department of Public Health said that as of Sunday, there have been 646 confirmed cases in the Bay State.

Of these total cases, MA DPH is attributing 5 deaths to COVID-19.

The breakdown by county is as follows:

  • Barnstable Co. – 24
  • Berkshire Co. – 23
  • Bristol Co. – 24
  • Dukes & Nantucket Co. – 1
  • Essex Co. – 60
  • Franklin Co. – 2
  • Hampden Co. – 12
  • Hampshire Co. – 4
  • Middlesex Co. – 199
  • Norfolk Co. – 75
  • Plymouth Co. – 25
  • Suffolk Co. – 126
  • Worcester Co. – 37
  • Unknown – 34

Mass. DPH noted that 71 people needed to be hospitalized, 263 did not need to be hospitalized and 312 people are still under investigation.

By age group the Mass. DPH reported the following Sunday:

  • 19 years or under: 18 people = 2.8%
  • 20-29: 93 people = 14.4%
  • 30-39: 112 people = 17.3%
  • 40-49: 134 people = 20.7%
  • 50-59: 119 people = 18.4%
  • 60-69: 87 people = 13.5%
  • 70 years or older: 83 = 12.8%

Of those 646 total cases, the state divided the exposures as follows:

  • 99 – Participants in the Biogen conference and family contacts of these people
  • 83 – Local broadcasting
  • 68 – Travel related
  • 396 – Under investigation

For further subdivision of the numbers, CLICK HERE.

Western Mass News will continue to follow this story and will have more information as it becomes available.

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Mass. Child Care Centers Closing Monday for all workers, except those critical of Coronavirus – NBC Boston

Massachusetts child care centers will close on Monday amid the coronavirus epidemic, but some exempt centers will open to take care of the children of critical workers, Governor Charlie Baker said Wednesday during a briefing.

Over 2,000 Massachusetts residents have been quarantined because of the coronavirus, according to the latest numbers released on Wednesday by state health officials.

The new figures show that 2,054 residents have been quarantined, with 1,168 still in quarantine and 886 that are no longer in quarantine. This is almost double the 1,083 total of a week ago.

As the number of COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts rises steadily, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh – who reported 45 cases in Boston on Wednesday afternoon – exposed his thought process about what would be needed to issue a shelter order. on site.

Baker said Tuesday that he had no intention of ordering residents to take refuge on the spot. However, more than a dozen state and local Democrats are urging the Republican to reconsider in an open letter.

Governor Charlie Baker says Massachusetts has no plans for its residents to take refuge on the spot, but said “difficult days are coming.”

In the letter, released Tuesday afternoon, the 17 Democrats asked Baker to seek shelter by Tuesday after other cities such as San Francisco.

“Doctors tell us that COVID-19 is about 10 times more contagious than the flu and that 1 in 5 infected people will contract severe pneumonia that will require hospitalization,” they said.

“Suppressing the spread of the virus is essential to protect the ability of healthcare professionals to manage the influx of new patients and to safeguard public health and safety. Epidemiologists have suggested that Massachusetts could see up to 10,000 cases by the end of this month.”

As of Tuesday, the total number of coronavirus cases in Massachusetts has risen to 218, according to public health officials.

The Motor Vehicle Registry was reopened on Wednesday, which attracted large crowds of people lined up, despite Governor Baker and Mayor Walsh’s call for social expulsion in Massachusetts.

Baker said Tuesday that while there were “difficult days ahead”, there were no plans to implement an ongoing refuge.

“We will probably have some very difficult days ahead of us, as we are still at the start of the battle against this virus,” said Baker. “Faith and trust. We will succeed by putting together, taking care of each other.”

Baker plans to provide an update on the coronavirus pandemic at 15:00. at the State House with Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito, sect. of health and human services Marylou Sudders and DPH Commissioner Dr. Monica Bharel.

In a Tuesday night television speech, Walsh called on the audience to distance social to flatten the coronavirus curve.

“We simply need everyone’s help, and that’s how we will get past this,” said Walsh. “This is not the time for home parties, dating or visiting friends. We need everyone to limit their contacts right now.”

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Massachusetts Coronavirus cases rise to 218 – NBC Boston

The total number of coronavirus cases in Massachusetts is up to 218, public health officials said Tuesday after it had arrived at 197 the day before.

Massachusetts is one of the states in the United States with the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country so far. While nobody died from the virus locally, more than 70 people died nationwide.

Severe restrictions on daily life have been ordered, including the canceled school, the limits on gathering in groups and eating in restaurants, while the state struggles to mitigate the spread of the deadly pandemic.

Earlier Tuesday, Governor Charlie Baker said Massachusetts faces “tough days ahead” and has torn down rumors that residents have been ordered to take refuge on the spot.

President Donald Trump and the Coronavirus Task Force gave updates on the coronavirus pandemic on Tuesday, urging people to follow the CDC guidelines for at least 15 days and to act very cautiously. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin later announced a tax deferral of the IRS for those who are liable to pay taxes.

For days, most Massachusetts cases represented in the Department of Public Health numbers were related to an employee meeting held by the local biotechnology company Biogen at a hotel in downtown Boston. But it is no longer so: Tuesday’s data show 102 people linked to the meeting directly or through members of their family.

Thirty-three cases were found to be transmitted locally and 24 related to travel, according to the numbers. Another 59 remain under investigation.

Someone has coronavirus in at least 10 of the state’s 14 counties.

Eighty-nine cases were in County Middlesex, 43 in Norfolk, 42 ​​in Suffolk, 14 in Berkshire, eight in Worcester and Essex, five in Bristol and Plymouth, two in Barnstable and one in Hampden. Another case has not yet been traced to a location.

Twenty-one cases have so far been confirmed as in need of hospitalization, while 52 remain under investigation and 145 people have not needed to go to hospital.

Many officials cited the phrase “flatten the curve” while seriously reducing public events. An infectious disease expert explained what it means and why it is crucial for the public health system.

The haste to limit social activity across the nation is an attempt to prevent the virus from spreading so quickly that it overwhelms hospital intensive care units, which places like Wuhan, China and Italy have seen.

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Coronavirus requires public health emergency in Boston – NBC Boston

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh on Sunday declared a public health emergency due to the coronavirus epidemic and announced radical changes for bars and restaurants in the city in an attempt to protect residents.

The emergency declaration will help the city’s marshal’s resources, Walsh said on Sunday at a press conference in the town hall. The city’s restaurant regulations come after a series of South Boston restaurants and bars decided to close on Sunday after people were seen packing them on Saturday.

Walsh has also strongly urged city residents to keep social distances, the practice of interacting as little as possible with others is less likely to spread the new coronavirus, which has already killed more than 60 people in the United States and thousands abroad .

“Social distancing is not a vague and ambitious strategy. It is backed by science,” said the mayor, adding later, “it will save lives.”

During a press conference on Sunday, Walsh launched an urgent appeal for residents to engage in social distancing during the coronavirus epidemic.

Following his Friday announcement that the Boston Public School buildings would be closed on Tuesday, Walsh said two school campuses will not open on Monday due to possible exposure in their communities: the Eliot and McKinley schools.

He acknowledged the difficulties families will face when school closes and said that among the ways it could help, the city will distribute food through places established in the city’s neighborhoods.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh has announced that the city’s public schools will close Tuesday, March 17, for over a month, in an attempt to protect students, their families and staff during the coronavirus epidemic.

The changes for the city’s bars, restaurants and clubs in the future are vast, including:

  • They will have to cut their capacity in half by removing tables and chairs to encourage social distancing.
  • No line can form outside.
  • Closing before 23:00, excluding restaurants offering drive-thru, take out or delivery.
  • Any restaurant that has not been allowed to make food can now do so – “basically we are allowing every single establishment that serves food in the city of Boston to take away,” he said.
  • The beer gardens will not be able to open for the season until the crisis has passed.

Violators will remain closed for 30 days, Walsh said.

He explained that he wants people to still be able to get food during the period of greatest social estrangement and does not want the city workers to suffer too much. He also thanked the 14 or more bars and restaurants that agreed to close after Saturday’s full rooms on Sunday.

On Sunday, Walsh gave advice on how best to achieve social distancing.

People arriving at U.S. airports from overseas on Saturday night reported that waiting times were online for the necessary medical visits during the coronavirus epidemic.

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26 new coronavirus cases in Massachusetts take the total to 164 – NBC Boston

There are currently 164 coronavirus cases in Massachusetts, state health officials shared on Sunday, and the number of residents tested went from 475 to nearly 800.

The 26 new cases were announced in a Commonwealth attempt to speed up testing for coronavirus after restrictions have been relaxed on the test protocols.

New guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requires doctors only to present a nasal swab instead of presenting previously required nasal and throat swabs. With the modification of the clinical test protocols, the state laboratory test capacity has doubled from 200 to around 400 patients per day.

Massachusetts doctors also now have greater flexibility to determine which patients should be tested without having to call DPH’s Epi Line.

With multiple clinical laboratories in the Bay State working to obtain FDA approval, health officials say that even more testing capabilities will soon be available.

As of Sunday, the Massachusetts State Public Health Laboratory has tested 799 patients, officials said, compared to 475 the previous day.

Forty-five of the 164 positive state cases were subsequently confirmed by the CDC.

Governor Charlie Baker is expected to provide an update on Sunday night about state testing efforts and what is being done to slow the spread of coronavirus in the Commonwealth.

Governor Baker and Governor Lieutenant Karyn Polito will join Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders and Commissioner of the Public Health Department Dr. Monica Bharel at the State House at 18:00. The Baker-Polito administration says that, contrary to popular rumors, it is not preparing a refuge in order.

Four of the 26 new cases announced on Sunday are related to the employee meeting held at a Boston hotel by Cambridge Biogen biotechnology company last month. Health officials say 108 of the 164 cases are now related to the February 24-27 meeting held at the Marriott Long Wharf hotel, which has since closed “in the interest of public health”.

In new cases, a healthcare professional is included at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. The hospital announced the case Sunday morning and said that patients and staff who may have had contact with the infected worker are being contacted.

Eight more cases are associated with travel, bringing the total to 13. Eight remain associated with a cluster in western Massachusetts and 35 of these are currently under investigation, health officials say.

Of the 164 cases in the state, 74 are women and 90 are men. Middlesex County residents still account for nearly half, 75 of the cases across the state. The counties of Norfolk and Suffolk both have 31 cases, while there are nine cases in County Berkshire. There are now six cases each in the Essex and Worcester counties.

The counties of Plymouth, Hampden, Barnstable and Bristol have one case each. Two cases are of unknown counties at the moment.

Two other patients have been hospitalized, bringing the total to 13 so far, although another 36 cases are listed as being investigated, according to Sunday’s data.

The update in coronavirus cases on Sunday came shortly after Boston Mayor Marty Walsh declared a public health emergency for the coronavirus epidemic and announced radical changes for bars and restaurants in the city in an attempt to protect residents.

Boston EMS urges people not to call 911 to request COVID-19 tests. People are asked to call their primary care providers, the mayor’s hotline at 617-534-5050 or the state DPH hotline at 211.

Virus-related symptoms include fever (100.4 ° F or higher), cough, breathing difficulties or shortness of breath.

Do you have coronavirus symptoms and want to get tested? We want to know your experience. Please share contact information with NBC10 Boston investigators here or email tips@nbcboston.com.

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Mass. Announces 15 new suspected coronavirus cases; all connected to the Biogen conference

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health announced 15 suspected new positive cases in the state, all directly linked to the Biogen employee conference in Boston late last month. The alleged new positive cases, which were released on Sunday, include five from Suffolk County between the ages of 30 and 60; five from County Middlesex ranging in age from 40 to 60; four Norfolk County cases ranging from 40 to 60 years old; and a female whose age and county of residence are unknown at the time of publication. The total number of COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts has risen to 28. There are 27 suspected positive cases and one confirmed case involving a University of Massachusetts, Boston, student. Among the presumed positive cases on Sunday were eight men and seven women. All the alleged positive cases on Sunday are isolating themselves at home. The Boston Public Health Commission, meanwhile, has confirmed that the five new alleged positive cases in Suffolk County are residents of Boston, bringing the total number of confirmed or presumed cases in the city to nine. The five new cases in Boston are a 30 year old woman, a woman in her sixties, a man in her forties, a man in her fifties and a man in her sixties. The BPHC also confirmed that these patients do not require hospitalization and self-quarantine themselves at home and that they had a connection with the Biogen conference. DPH announced five positive presumptive cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, three of which had a direct connection to the Biogen employee conference, one with recent international travel and a fifth case for which there is no known connection to the Biogen conference or foreign trips. With the release on Sunday 23rd of the alleged positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Massachusetts are associated with the meeting of Biogen employees held in late February. As of Sunday’s announcement, Middlesex County has 10 suspected positive COVID-19 cases. Norfolk County has seven presumptive cases and County Berkshire has one presumptive case. The risk of COVID-19 for the general public in Massachusetts remains low at this time, according to state health officials. There are special outpatient units set up at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital specifically for COVID-19 tests. Tests in these units, however, are only allowed for a defined group of patients, according to a statement issued by hospitals and HealthCare partners. “The special outpatient units set up at BWH and MGH for COVID-19 screening are testing a defined group of patients who have been determined to have exposure to someone with coronavirus, as well as to those who are at risk according to Center criteria for the control and prevention of diseases “, reads the note. “We understand that many people are anxious to be screened, but COVID-19 tests are not currently open to members of the general public. People who have questions about whether they should be tested should contact their primary care providers. who can work with public health officials to determine if tests are indicated. “The 27 suspected positive cases in Massachusetts are reported based on local tests but are still awaiting confirmation from the US Centers for Control and disease prevention. Further information from the DPH on COVID-19 can be found by clicking on this link.

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health announced 15 suspected new positive cases in the state, all directly linked to the Biogen employee conference in Boston late last month.

The new alleged positive cases, which were released on Sunday, include five from Suffolk County ranging from 30 to 60 years old; five from County Middlesex ranging in age from 40 to 60; four Norfolk County cases ranging from 40 to 60 years old; and a female whose age and county of residence are unknown at the time of publication.

The total number of COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts has risen to 28. There are 27 suspected positive cases and one confirmed case involving a University of Massachusetts, Boston, student.

Sunday’s alleged positive cases included eight men and seven women. All the alleged positive cases on Sunday are isolating themselves at home.

The Boston Public Health Commission, meanwhile, has confirmed that the five new alleged positive cases in Suffolk County are residents of Boston, bringing the total number of confirmed or presumed cases in the city to nine.

The five new cases in Boston are a 30 year old woman, a 60 year old woman, a 40 year old man, a 50 year old man and a 60 year old man.

The BPHC also confirmed that these patients do not require hospitalization and self-quarantine themselves at home and that they had a direct connection to the Biogen conference.

The DPH announced five suspected positive COVID-19 cases on Saturday, three of which had a direct connection to the Biogen employee conference, one with recent international travel and a fifth case for which there is no known connection to the Biogen employee conference. Biogen or to travel abroad.

With Sunday’s release, 23 of the suspected positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Massachusetts are associated with the Biogen employee meeting held in late February.

As of Sunday’s announcement, Middlesex County has 10 suspected positive COVID-19 cases. County Norfolk has seven presumptive cases and County Berkshire has a presumptive case.

The risk of COVID-19 for the general public in Massachusetts remains low at this time, according to state health officials.

There are special outpatient units set up at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital specifically for COVID-19 tests. Tests in these units, however, are only allowed for a defined group of patients, according to a statement issued by hospitals and HealthCare partners.

“The special outpatient units set up at BWH and MGH for COVID-19 screening are testing a defined group of patients who have been determined to have exposure to someone with coronavirus as well as to those who are at risk according to the Centers’ criteria for disease control and prevention, “reads the note. “We understand that many people are anxious to be screened, but COVID-19 tests are not currently open to members of the general public. People who have questions about whether they should be tested should contact their primary care providers. who can work with public health officials to determine if tests are indicated. “

The 27 suspected positive cases in Massachusetts are reported based on local tests but are still awaiting confirmation from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further information from the DPH on COVID-19 is available by clicking on this link.

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Nursing homes face unique challenges with Coronavirus – NBC Los Angeles

From Miami to Seattle, nursing homes and other facilities for the elderly host stocks of masks and thermometers, preparing staff shortages and checking visitors to protect a particularly vulnerable population from the coronavirus.

In China, where the epidemic started, the disease was basically deadly for the elderly. In Italy, the epicenter of the virus epidemic in Europe, the more than 100 people who died were elderly, suffering from other complications or both.

Of the 19 deaths in the United States since Saturday, at least 14 had been linked to a nursing home in the Seattle area, along with many other infections among residents, staff and family members. The Seattle Times reported that a second nursing home and a retired community in the area had reported a virus case.

This has alerted other structures in the United States, especially in states with large populations of older residents, such as Florida and California. About 2.5 million people live in long-term care facilities in the United States.

“For people over the age of 80 … the death rate could reach 15%,” said Mark Parkinson, president of the American Health Care Association nursing homes group.

The federal government is now focusing all inspections of nursing homes on infection control, identifying facilities in the city with confirmed cases and those previously mentioned for not following the protocol.

Federal regulations already require homes to have a specialist in preventing infections in staff, and many have already taken measures to deal with seasonal flow and other ailments that pose a greater risk to the elderly.

Even so, the response of structures to coronavirus has varied across the country.

In Florida, where some 160,000 seniors live in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, mandatory screening for visitors is not expected “because we are not at that point,” said Florida Health Care Association spokeswoman Kristen Knapp.

But aged care centers are posting signs that urge visitors to stay away if they have symptoms and are looking for alternative ways to connect to families, such as through video chats, Knapp said.

Concierges in the 14 Florida nursing homes managed by Palm Gardens Corporation are now offering all visitors a short questionnaire asking for information on symptoms, recent trips and contacts with others, said company vice president Luke Neumann.

Neumann said that nursing homes have also purchased additional thermometers in case they have to check visitors’ temperatures and accumulate preventive supplies, including medical masks, protective goggles and clothing. In laundries they make sure to use enough bleach and heat to kill any persistent viral germs, he said.

In the South Shore Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center south of Boston, patient Leo Marchand holds a container of disinfectant wipes on a shelf near the bed that he uses several times a day. The 71-year-old Vietnam veteran and retired truck driver has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which makes it difficult to breathe. The possibility of contracting the coronavirus scares him.

“It’s a concern,” said Marchand. “Really.”

Many facilities across the country have said they have trouble getting masks and medical clothes because of the shortage.

The more intense screening of visitors, meanwhile, isn’t going well with some.

“Some of the visitors have been quite reluctant to comply, and this has been stressful,” said Janet Snipes, executive director of Denver’s Holly Heights nursing center.

Under federal regulations, nursing homes are considered to be a patient’s residence and facilities want to keep them in contact with the family, especially when they are almost dead.

“I don’t think you can completely prevent visitors,” said Dr. David A. Nace, director of long-term care and flu programs at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine. Supervise 300 facilities in Pennsylvania.

For now, facilities in most states are underlining basic precautions, including hand washing and the cough tag.

Centers across the country are also trying to prepare staff for the worst.

An adult daycare center in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami purchased long-lasting ready meals in preparation for possible shortages. The Hebrew Home in Riverdale, New York is running nursing staff through exercises to see how they will handle situations in the 750-bed facility if the virus progresses. Their IT department is building an infrastructure to allow staff to work remotely if they get sick.

“If one of our sites has an outbreak, we will quickly run out of staff in that position,” said Randy Bury, CEO of The Good Samaritan Society, one of the largest nonprofit senior care providers in the country, with 19,000 employees in 24 states.

Some families are considering withdrawing loved ones from the facilities.

Kathleen Churchyard said her family decided to move her 80-year-old mother out of her retirement community near Jacksonville, Florida, and to her sister’s home nearby if the virus is confirmed in the area.

Churchyard, who lives in Concord, North Carolina, fears that her mother won’t take her seriously, and is particularly concerned about her dining room.

“I tried to get her to buy things to prepare … She said, ‘No. If (the virus) catches me, it takes it,'” said Churchyard.

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Associate associate writer Philip Marcelo in Rockland, Massachusetts contributed to this report.

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The Associated Press receives support for health and scientific coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Governor Charlie Baker, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to provide preparation and planning update – NBC Boston

As the number of cases continues to rise here and across the country, Massachusetts government Charlie Baker and Boston Mayor Marty Walsh are slated to provide an update on local preparation and planning on Friday.

Baker, Walsh, Marylou Sudders, secretary for health and human services, commissioner for public health Monica Bharel and other city and state health officials are expected to hold a press conference at 12:30. at Boston City Hall.

On Thursday, the Massachusetts Public Health Department confirmed a third possible coronavirus case in the state. A woman in Middlesex county in her sixties who recently traveled to northern Italy has a presumptive case of COVID-19.

Health officials say a Tennessee man who tested positive for coronavirus traveled through Boston airport.

Earlier Thursday, hospital officials said they confirmed that a patient who had entered Norwell’s South Shore Medical Center had an alleged positive coronavirus case. It was not immediately clear whether this was the same case. Norwell is located in the county of Plymouth.

Previously, public health officials recognized a confirmed case in a UMass Boston student who had traveled to Wuhan, China, and an alleged positive case involving a 20-year-old woman living in Norfolk County who had recently returned. from Italy with a school group.

Rhode Island and New Hampshire also had two suspected positive cases each.

Several local restaurants claim to be struggling with the uncertainty caused by the coronavirus epidemic.

Biogen announced on Thursday that three people who attended a corporate meeting in Boston last week have tested positive for the virus.

And Tennessee health officials announced that a 44-year-old man diagnosed with that state’s first coronavirus case had recently flown to Boston Logan International Airport on a round-trip flight from Nashville International Airport. They said it was asymptomatic during the trip.

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