Why are publishers wary of the compensation offered by Google?

► What does Google offer to pay publishers?

Google announced on June 25 a new program for “Help publishers monetize their content”. This new service, which would select media articles with which it would sign license agreements for remuneration, will be offered on Google News and Discover before the end of the year in three countries: Germany, Australia and Brazil.

The American group says it has found common ground with the newspapers The mirror, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and The time in Germany, the press groups Schwartz Media or The Conversation in Australia, newspapers or Associated Diaries in Brazil.

→ EXPLANATION. Neighboring law, publishers united against Google’s “coup”

In a blog post published on June 26, Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of media, points out that this new licensing program to pay for journalistic content “Will include payment for free access to paid items”. And that his group is ” in discussion “ to extend it to more “Partners and countries in the weeks and months to come”.

► How do French publishers react?

In France, where press publishers are fighting for Google to apply French law which transposes the European directive on neighboring rights to remunerate press content, this initiative is greeted with distrust and annoyance.

→ READ. What does the creation of a neighboring right for the press imply?

“Google shares the names of the newspapers that will receive their subsidies and have fallen into their nets”, reacted on Twitter Pierre Louette, president of the group Les Echos-Le Parisien, assuring that“In France, the fight for neighboring rights continues, a united front”.

This reaction illustrates the fear that Google is seeking to sign individual commercial agreements with certain publishers to circumvent the neighboring rights directive. The concern concerns primarily Germany: this country, which had been one of the first with Brazil to want to charge the search engine for the use of press articles, would pave the way for license agreements with Google in Europe, while the directive has not yet been transposed into its legislation.

In France, French publishers had to seize the Competition Authority to force Google to negotiate in good faith with them and find by September a compensation agreement under the law on neighboring rights. Google has committed to it, but clarified that these license agreements constitute “One of the elements of the negotiations”.

► What risk for the application of French law?

Senator PS David Assouline, rapporteur for this law, wants to be reassuring: “The law does not allow this circumvention and the united press has so far assured that it would not be drawn into such a maneuver”, he reacts, hoping that “This will be the case until the end of the negotiations”.

Google has already proposed bilateral agreements to some publishers in the spring, including Le Figaro, Les Echos-Le Parisien, Le Monde or West France for amounts ranging from 90,000 to 900,000 euros per year, but “The discussions remain exploratory and are not conclusive at this stage” according to an article in Le Monde of March 3, 2020.

For Nikos Smyrnaios, teacher-researcher at the University of Toulouse-III and specialist in online press, interviewed by Agence France-Presse, this initiative reflects the character “Asymmetrical” relations between Google, in a situation of virtual monopoly, and very numerous publishers. “This monopoly allows each actor to impose a different relationship, he emphasizes. There is an aura darlings of Google who will have the possibility of touching a little money for the remuneration of their content, but that will mean that the objective of Google remains not to remunerate all the others ».

→ TRIBUNE. Google once again above the law?

Google already spent around 270 million euros to support journalism through the Google News Initiative, but these were subsidies to encourage the digital mutation of titles and not an economic partnership generating income on both sides. . That is to say if the « front uni » posted by the publishers of France, the first country to have transposed the copyright directive, is scrutinized worldwide.

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Why are publishers wary of the compensation offered by Google?

► What does Google offer to pay publishers?

Google announced on June 25 a new program for “Help publishers monetize their content”. This new service, which would select media articles with which it would sign license agreements for remuneration, will be offered on Google News and Discover before the end of the year in three countries: Germany, Australia and Brazil.

The American group says it has found common ground with the newspapers The mirror, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and The time in Germany, the press groups Schwartz Media or The Conversation in Australia, newspapers or Associated Diaries in Brazil.

→ EXPLANATION. Neighboring law, publishers united against Google’s “coup”

In a blog post published on June 26, Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of media, points out that this new licensing program to pay for journalistic content “Will include payment for free access to paid items”. And that his group is ” in discussion “ to extend it to more “Partners and countries in the weeks and months to come”.

► How do French publishers react?

In France, where press publishers are fighting for Google to apply French law which transposes the European directive on neighboring rights to remunerate press content, this initiative is greeted with distrust and annoyance.

→ READ. What does the creation of a neighboring right for the press imply?

“Google shares the names of the newspapers that will receive their subsidies and have fallen into their nets”, reacted on Twitter Pierre Louette, president of the group Les Echos-Le Parisien, assuring that“In France, the fight for neighboring rights continues, a united front”.

This reaction illustrates the fear that Google is seeking to sign individual commercial agreements with certain publishers to circumvent the neighboring rights directive. The concern concerns primarily Germany: this country, which had been one of the first with Brazil to want to charge the search engine for the use of press articles, would pave the way for license agreements with Google in Europe, while the directive has not yet been transposed into its legislation.

In France, French publishers had to seize the Competition Authority to force Google to negotiate in good faith with them and find by September a compensation agreement under the law on neighboring rights. Google has committed to it, but clarified that these license agreements constitute “One of the elements of the negotiations”.

► What risk for the application of French law?

Senator PS David Assouline, rapporteur for this law, wants to be reassuring: “The law does not allow this circumvention and the united press has so far assured that it would not be drawn into such a maneuver”, he reacts, hoping that “This will be the case until the end of the negotiations”.

Google has already proposed bilateral agreements to some publishers in the spring, including Le Figaro, Les Echos-Le Parisien, Le Monde or West France for amounts ranging from 90,000 to 900,000 euros per year, but “The discussions remain exploratory and are not conclusive at this stage” according to an article in Le Monde of March 3, 2020.

For Nikos Smyrnaios, teacher-researcher at the University of Toulouse-III and specialist in online press, interviewed by Agence France-Presse, this initiative reflects the character “Asymmetrical” relations between Google, in a situation of virtual monopoly, and very numerous publishers. “This monopoly allows each actor to impose a different relationship, he emphasizes. There is an aura darlings of Google who will have the possibility of touching a little money for the remuneration of their content, but that will mean that the objective of Google remains not to remunerate all the others ».

→ TRIBUNE. Google once again above the law?

Google already spent around 270 million euros to support journalism through the Google News Initiative, but these were subsidies to encourage the digital mutation of titles and not an economic partnership generating income on both sides. . That is to say if the « front uni » posted by the publishers of France, the first country to have transposed the copyright directive, is scrutinized worldwide.

.

Why are publishers wary of the compensation offered by Google?

► What does Google offer to pay publishers?

Google announced on June 25 a new program for “Help publishers monetize their content”. This new service, which would select media articles with which it would sign license agreements for remuneration, will be offered on Google News and Discover before the end of the year in three countries: Germany, Australia and Brazil.

The American group says it has found common ground with the newspapers The mirror, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and The time in Germany, the press groups Schwartz Media or The Conversation in Australia, newspapers or Associated Diaries in Brazil.

→ EXPLANATION. Neighboring law, publishers united against Google’s “coup”

In a blog post published on June 26, Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of media, points out that this new licensing program to pay for journalistic content “Will include payment for free access to paid items”. And that his group is ” in discussion “ to extend it to more “Partners and countries in the weeks and months to come”.

► How do French publishers react?

In France, where press publishers are fighting for Google to apply French law which transposes the European directive on neighboring rights to remunerate press content, this initiative is greeted with distrust and annoyance.

→ READ. What does the creation of a neighboring right for the press imply?

“Google shares the names of the newspapers that will receive their subsidies and have fallen into their nets”, reacted on Twitter Pierre Louette, president of the group Les Echos-Le Parisien, assuring that“In France, the fight for neighboring rights continues, a united front”.

This reaction illustrates the fear that Google is seeking to sign individual commercial agreements with certain publishers to circumvent the neighboring rights directive. The concern concerns primarily Germany: this country, which had been one of the first with Brazil to want to charge the search engine for the use of press articles, would pave the way for license agreements with Google in Europe, while the directive has not yet been transposed into its legislation.

In France, French publishers had to seize the Competition Authority to force Google to negotiate in good faith with them and find by September a compensation agreement under the law on neighboring rights. Google has committed to it, but clarified that these license agreements constitute “One of the elements of the negotiations”.

► What risk for the application of French law?

Senator PS David Assouline, rapporteur for this law, wants to be reassuring: “The law does not allow this circumvention and the united press has so far assured that it would not be drawn into such a maneuver”, he reacts, hoping that “This will be the case until the end of the negotiations”.

Google has already proposed bilateral agreements to some publishers in the spring, including Le Figaro, Les Echos-Le Parisien, Le Monde or West France for amounts ranging from 90,000 to 900,000 euros per year, but “The discussions remain exploratory and are not conclusive at this stage” according to an article in Le Monde of March 3, 2020.

For Nikos Smyrnaios, teacher-researcher at the University of Toulouse-III and specialist in online press, interviewed by Agence France-Presse, this initiative reflects the character “Asymmetrical” relations between Google, in a situation of virtual monopoly, and very numerous publishers. “This monopoly allows each actor to impose a different relationship, he emphasizes. There is an aura darlings of Google who will have the possibility of touching a little money for the remuneration of their content, but that will mean that the objective of Google remains not to remunerate all the others ».

→ TRIBUNE. Google once again above the law?

Google already spent around 270 million euros to support journalism through the Google News Initiative, but these were subsidies to encourage the digital mutation of titles and not an economic partnership generating income on both sides. . That is to say if the « front uni » posted by the publishers of France, the first country to have transposed the copyright directive, is scrutinized worldwide.

.

Why are publishers wary of the compensation offered by Google?

► What does Google offer to pay publishers?

Google announced on June 25 a new program for “Help publishers monetize their content”. This new service, which would select media articles with which it would sign license agreements for remuneration, will be offered on Google News and Discover before the end of the year in three countries: Germany, Australia and Brazil.

The American group says it has found common ground with the newspapers The mirror, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and The time in Germany, the press groups Schwartz Media or The Conversation in Australia, newspapers or Associated Diaries in Brazil.

→ EXPLANATION. Neighboring law, publishers united against Google’s “coup”

In a blog post published on June 26, Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of media, points out that this new licensing program to pay for journalistic content “Will include payment for free access to paid items”. And that his group is ” in discussion “ to extend it to more “Partners and countries in the weeks and months to come”.

► How do French publishers react?

In France, where press publishers are fighting for Google to apply French law which transposes the European directive on neighboring rights to remunerate press content, this initiative is greeted with distrust and annoyance.

→ READ. What does the creation of a neighboring right for the press imply?

“Google shares the names of the newspapers that will receive their subsidies and have fallen into their nets”, reacted on Twitter Pierre Louette, president of the group Les Echos-Le Parisien, assuring that“In France, the fight for neighboring rights continues, a united front”.

This reaction illustrates the fear that Google is seeking to sign individual commercial agreements with certain publishers to circumvent the neighboring rights directive. The concern concerns primarily Germany: this country, which had been one of the first with Brazil to want to charge the search engine for the use of press articles, would pave the way for license agreements with Google in Europe, while the directive has not yet been transposed into its legislation.

In France, French publishers had to seize the Competition Authority to force Google to negotiate in good faith with them and find by September a compensation agreement under the law on neighboring rights. Google has committed to it, but clarified that these license agreements constitute “One of the elements of the negotiations”.

► What risk for the application of French law?

Senator PS David Assouline, rapporteur for this law, wants to be reassuring: “The law does not allow this circumvention and the united press has so far assured that it would not be drawn into such a maneuver”, he reacts, hoping that “This will be the case until the end of the negotiations”.

Google has already proposed bilateral agreements to some publishers in the spring, including Le Figaro, Les Echos-Le Parisien, Le Monde or West France for amounts ranging from 90,000 to 900,000 euros per year, but “The discussions remain exploratory and are not conclusive at this stage” according to an article in Le Monde of March 3, 2020.

For Nikos Smyrnaios, teacher-researcher at the University of Toulouse-III and specialist in online press, interviewed by Agence France-Presse, this initiative reflects the character “Asymmetrical” relations between Google, in a situation of virtual monopoly, and very numerous publishers. “This monopoly allows each actor to impose a different relationship, he emphasizes. There is an aura darlings of Google who will have the possibility of touching a little money for the remuneration of their content, but that will mean that the objective of Google remains not to remunerate all the others ».

→ TRIBUNE. Google once again above the law?

Google already spent around 270 million euros to support journalism through the Google News Initiative, but these were subsidies to encourage the digital mutation of titles and not an economic partnership generating income on both sides. . That is to say if the « front uni » posted by the publishers of France, the first country to have transposed the copyright directive, is scrutinized worldwide.

.

Why are publishers wary of the compensation offered by Google?

► What does Google offer to pay publishers?

Google announced on June 25 a new program for “Help publishers monetize their content”. This new service, which would select media articles with which it would sign license agreements for remuneration, will be offered on Google News and Discover before the end of the year in three countries: Germany, Australia and Brazil.

The American group says it has found common ground with the newspapers The mirror, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and The time in Germany, the press groups Schwartz Media or The Conversation in Australia, newspapers or Associated Diaries in Brazil.

→ EXPLANATION. Neighboring law, publishers united against Google’s “coup”

In a blog post published on June 26, Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of media, points out that this new licensing program to pay for journalistic content “Will include payment for free access to paid items”. And that his group is ” in discussion “ to extend it to more “Partners and countries in the weeks and months to come”.

► How do French publishers react?

In France, where press publishers are fighting for Google to apply French law which transposes the European directive on neighboring rights to remunerate press content, this initiative is greeted with distrust and annoyance.

→ READ. What does the creation of a neighboring right for the press imply?

“Google shares the names of the newspapers that will receive their subsidies and have fallen into their nets”, reacted on Twitter Pierre Louette, president of the group Les Echos-Le Parisien, assuring that“In France, the fight for neighboring rights continues, a united front”.

This reaction illustrates the fear that Google is seeking to sign individual commercial agreements with certain publishers to circumvent the neighboring rights directive. The concern concerns primarily Germany: this country, which had been one of the first with Brazil to want to charge the search engine for the use of press articles, would pave the way for license agreements with Google in Europe, while the directive has not yet been transposed into its legislation.

In France, French publishers had to seize the Competition Authority to force Google to negotiate in good faith with them and find by September a compensation agreement under the law on neighboring rights. Google has committed to it, but clarified that these license agreements constitute “One of the elements of the negotiations”.

► What risk for the application of French law?

Senator PS David Assouline, rapporteur for this law, wants to be reassuring: “The law does not allow this circumvention and the united press has so far assured that it would not be drawn into such a maneuver”, he reacts, hoping that “This will be the case until the end of the negotiations”.

Google has already proposed bilateral agreements to some publishers in the spring, including Le Figaro, Les Echos-Le Parisien, Le Monde or West France for amounts ranging from 90,000 to 900,000 euros per year, but “The discussions remain exploratory and are not conclusive at this stage” according to an article in Le Monde of March 3, 2020.

For Nikos Smyrnaios, teacher-researcher at the University of Toulouse-III and specialist in online press, interviewed by Agence France-Presse, this initiative reflects the character “Asymmetrical” relations between Google, in a situation of virtual monopoly, and very numerous publishers. “This monopoly allows each actor to impose a different relationship, he emphasizes. There is an aura darlings of Google who will have the possibility of touching a little money for the remuneration of their content, but that will mean that the objective of Google remains not to remunerate all the others ».

→ TRIBUNE. Google once again above the law?

Google already spent around 270 million euros to support journalism through the Google News Initiative, but these were subsidies to encourage the digital mutation of titles and not an economic partnership generating income on both sides. . That is to say if the « front uni » posted by the publishers of France, the first country to have transposed the copyright directive, is scrutinized worldwide.

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Charles Ehlinger, great figure of the Catholic edition, carried away by the Covid-19

Charles Ehlinger died on Saturday, May 2, at the age of 92, of the coronavirus that affected him after his general health had deteriorated significantly since last winter. Assumptionist for nearly forty years, he was a remarkable publisher in the religious field. He is notably responsible for many works by the Jesuit François Varillon.

→ LIVE. Coronavirus: the latest news in France and worldwide on May 4

Born September 15, 1927 in Urbès (Haut-Rhin), he made his first profession with the Augustinians of the Assumption in 1946 and made his final vows in Lyon on November 21, 1950. Ordained priest in Lyon in 1954 after studying philosophy and a bachelor’s degree in theology and scripture, he was responsible from 1959 to 1964 for the year of pastoral training for young priests of several religious institutes and dioceses.

An engaging and influential man

Gifted with a keen sense of discernment, he leaves fond memories for those who approached him. The intellectual curiosity of this hard worker made him a reference. Charles left behind a beautiful and noble life, even if it was not always easy. The concern for truth which always animated him pushed him to courageous decisions, says Father Michel Kubler, assumptionist, former religious editor of The cross. He wielded – without really realizing it – an important influence on many people and a kind of magisterium in the world of religious publishing in his time.

Same emotion for Marc Leboucher, editor at Salvator who was previously responsible for DDB editions: He was a very big publisher, a true birth attendant. Her natural discretion went well with the backstage position inherent in this profession. It was a sharp mind, always kind, but never complacent at work.

A committed publisher

Director from 1964 to 1983 of the Centurion editions which then formed part of the Bayard group (publisher of The cross), Charles Ehlinger put together an impressive catalog of notable books and important authors. He translated the very controversial Dutch catechism (1968), launched the pastoral translation of the Bible in 4 volumes, The Bible of the People of God (1971), as well as the publication of the Acts of the Council with 200 pages of analytical table, thus constituting a first synthesis of Vatican II.

→ READ. Death of Bernard Jouanno, a religious serving the press

A man of encounter and dialogue, he created a collection of interview books with religious or lay people such as the Dominican cardinal Yves Congar, cardinal François Marty, cardinal Etchegaray, but also Alfred Grosser … and Georges Brassens! The author of major interviews himself, he was also a scrupulous translator of works of theology and exegesis in German or English.

He has mainly published successful works that have nourished the spiritual life of thousands of readers, with authors such as François Varillon (The humility of God, then The Suffering of God ; Joy of believing, joy of living; Beauty of the world, suffering of men…), the assumptionist André Sève (30 minutes for God, 1974, Try to love, 1976) or Pierre Talec (Things of faith, 1973).

Crossing the trials

In 1984, after a painful and old reflection on his faith, and after two years on leave from the congregation, Charles Ehlinger renounced “for reasons of conscience” his ministry and religious life without breaking the constant ties with the Church and with the Assumption. He then joined the Desclée De Brouwer (DDB) editions as editor and collection director, until his retirement at the very beginning of the 1990s. Finally in 2005, Charles Ehlinger, published with Michel Kubler, a last book of interviews produced with Mgr Joseph Doré under the title The Grace of Living (Bayard).

After a few years of solitude in the Paris region, he had moved closer to his family in Alsace and settled in Thann (Haut-Rhin). In December 2019, he had to leave his apartment and the thousand pounds he had left to be hospitalized in Oderen, before joining the Ehderen d’Oderen from where he was again hospitalized in intensive care for the last three weeks in Thann.

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The Annecy Festival, a rich and competitive digital edition

They long believed that the Annecy International Animated Film Festival could be held June 15-21. An edition all the more awaited that it was to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the event. But ” reason and the international situation “Forced its organizers to cancel the 2020 edition. For a time considered, the option of a postponement was ruled out for material reasons.

→ LIVE. Coronavirus: the latest information in France and worldwide

The festival occupies many cinemas which must be reserved well in advance, explains Marcel Jean, artistic delegate of the festival. Furthermore, the issue of postponements is very sensitive. The announcement by the Cannes Film Festival that it might be held in late June was a factor in the equation, because it prevented us from postponing by ten days …

The 44th edition of the festival was also to shine a spotlight on African animation cinema. ” However, the coronavirus arrived later in the countries concerned, and African directors would no doubt have had trouble coming “, Emphasizes Marcel Jean.

There will be a prize list in 2020

After first rejecting the idea of ​​a digital edition, the organizers ended up choosing this option. But for Marcel Jean, a digital festival is an oxymoron. ” The festival is a party shared with the public and professionals gathered in the same place and at the same time, he insists. It’s more of an online event that we’re hosting.

The form that this virtual edition will take is still subject to adjustments, on the eve of the announcement, Wednesday April 15, of part of its selection (short films, end of study films, television productions and order films). Marcel Jean confirms that it will be the subject of a competition and will conclude with a prize list.

Because the prices are not only honorary. ” Several partners, such as Sacem and the City of Annecy, donate their prizes. It’s not trivial for the award-winning directors. In addition, in certain countries, such as France and Canada, the selections and prices trigger aid for future productions. The Annecy Crystal is a trophy that also allows its winner to be eligible for the Oscar nomination. The organizers are in discussions with the Academy of American Cinema so that the winners of this new edition will be taken into account.

Maintaining an online edition also has advantages. In Annecy to which thousands of productions, including short films, have been subjected, ” it would be impossible to postpone their selection until next yearsays Marcel Jean. The traffic jam created would disadvantage older films, as they will have already traveled a lot in other festivals. There have also been few withdrawals of short films, with the announcement of this online edition.

A wider audience?

For feature films, whose economy is more complex, withdrawals were more numerous, but can be counted on the fingers of one hand. In two cases, the films could not have been completed on time due to production restrictions. Another producer withdrew his film for fear of piracy but also for rights issues. “ Showing a feature film on the web can make it difficult for its international seller “, Points Marcel Jean. The announcement of feature films is also postponed to the end of April or the beginning of May.

→ EXPLANATION. Cannes 2020: the Festival is planning a meeting in another form

“Physical” festival accreditations will be refunded, but new ones will be offered at lower prices for the digital event. The platform will give access to finished films but also to the famous “Work in progress”, a behind-the-scenes presentation of an ongoing project. These sessions, taken by storm during the festival, should allow a wider audience to attend. ” A company contacted us to negotiate access to all of its 150 employees “Said Marcel Jean, who announces that the accreditation rules will be clarified by the end of April.

Mickaël Marin, director of the festival, confirms for his part, that the film market which is held at the same time as the festival, will also take place, according to terms which remain to be determined. As for the financial impact, says the director, ” it is too early to say, but we will have to face difficult months or years

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Former boss of Seuil publishing, Michel Chodkiewicz is dead

He was a singular man in the publishing world. The former boss of Editions du Seuil, Michel Chodkiewicz, a specialist in Sufism to which he had converted, died Thursday, April 2 at the age of 90, said the publishing house. He was its director between 1979 and 1989.

The man had climbed all levels of the company, while conducting academic research on Sufi Islam. ” He started in the 1950s as a courier, then was given readings. He was so brilliant that he became an editor “Recalls Jean-Louis Schlegel, sociologist, who was hired at Seuil by Michel Chodkiewicz in 1986.

Appointed director general of Seuil in 1977, Michel Chodkiewicz had become its CEO in 1979, succeeding the founders Jean Bardet and Paul Flamand. ” The Threshold had grown fantastically since 1965 and Michel Chodkiewicz has made this legacy very fruitful. He confirmed Place du Seuil as a “leftist” publisher in the Parisian panorama “Continues Jean-Louis Schlegel.

The new boss will bring his rigor in business management, at a time of great difficulty for the publishing house. “ Michel Chodkiewicz had learned, three months after his appointment as CEO, that Le Seuil had a gigantic deficit. He accepted the mission to straighten the house, remembers Jean-Claude Guillebaud, who worked as literary director by his side. Nothing compelled him to. It was very brave. Almost chivalrous.

He was someone brutal, who didn’t take precautions, continues Jean-Claude Guillebaud, but he was also very frank. When we left his office, we knew that there were no unsaid. He accepted the contradiction. It was very stimulating to work with him

Converted to Sufi Islam

Michel Chodkiewicz came from a Polish Catholic family and converted to Islam with his wife at the age of 20. He remained modest about his conversion, without hiding his faith. In an interview given to New Observer (1), he explained that she was ” the culmination of personal research started in adolescence. There was the combination of intellectual interest in the richness of the Islamic tradition with the meeting of exceptional people ”.

To Jean-Claude Guillebaud who questioned him on the reason why he had not remained Catholic, he replied: “ Catholics are interested in many things but less and less in God. I’m interested in God. “

He was doing Ramadan, but it was without having him carry to others “, Evokes Jean-Louis Schlegel. He was praying in his office, just shutting his door for a while.

A taste for spiritual texts

At Le Seuil, his presidential years were marked by the publication of numerous bestsellers which enabled the company to quickly overcome its financial difficulties. They were crowned with two Goncourt prizes for The Sacred Night by Tahar Ben Jelloun (1987) and The Colonial Exhibition by Erik Orsenna (1988).

As for religious publications, he maintained the tradition of the publishing house of publishing great spiritual texts. “ Those were years when we were imbued with all the possible and imaginable critical glances on the religious, recalls Jean-Louis Schlegel. Michel Chodkiewicz fully accepted the view of the humanities on religions, but he also wanted to publish spiritual books on Judaism, Christianity, Islam. He was always careful not to reduce the religious to his scientific analysis

At the end of a ten-year mandate as chairman of the Seuil, a mandate he had set himself to the day, Michel Chodkiewicz left the Seuil to become director of studies at the Ecole de Hautes Etudes en Sciences social (EHESS). Retired, he continued his research on Sufism, publishing his latest book on Ibn’Arabî, A shoreless ocean, in 1992.

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