Corona in refugee homes: Until the Bundeswehr comes


Many infected people: initial reception facility in Ellwangen
Picture: dpa

Are refugee shelters developing into corona hotspots? The federal states try to limit the spread of the virus as much as possible. This pushes some homes to their limits.

ÄSimilar to nursing homes or old people’s homes, the risk of infection with the corona virus is particularly high in refugee facilities because many people live together in a confined space. While frail residents of nursing homes are at risk of being infected by the staff, refugee homes are primarily home to young, mobile people who can also spread the infection themselves.

Pure burger

Rudiger Soldt

How quickly the situation can worsen was shown at the beginning of the week in Ellwangen, Baden-Württemberg. The management of the local initial reception facility there had to request even the Bundeswehr because of numerous refugees with Corona infection. Since the beginning of the week, 35 soldiers from the Alb barracks in Stetten am Kalten Markt have been helping out in the refugee accommodation – they distribute food packages, support the doctors and nurses in the infirmary and ensure that protective masks and protective suits are distributed fairly. Infected and healthy refugees were moved to different buildings shortly after the test results were available.

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In the Korian Ehpad, “swallowed up by the wave” of the Covid-19

For the past month, the fatal countdowns have been making headlines in the press: at “Villa Victoria” in Noisy-le-Grand (Seine-Saint-Denis), 25 deaths; the “Aurélias” of Pollionnay (Rhône), 28 deaths; at “la Vill’Alizé” in Thise (Doubs), 26 deaths … And the heaviest death toll known to date, at “la Riviera” de Mougins and its 36 dead residents (read pages 6-7). What do they have in common? All belong to the Korian group, which specializes in retirement homes. In France, since 1er March, 511 deaths are attributed to Covid-19 in the company’s establishments, according to the latest figures communicated by management to Release. A report probably far from the reality of the disaster, the deaths of residents occurring at the hospital are not included.

According to our information, several other sites of the group, hitherto under the radar, also display a worrying excess mortality. At the “Hawk” of Le Bourget (Seine-Saint-Denis), which has 114 places, 24 residents died. At the “Halage”, near

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Chloé Pilorget-Rezzouk

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Ismaël Halissat

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Ehpad de Mougins: “The virus quickly installed, it was dazzling”

The chair turns its back on the window. This view which is reflected in the bay window, Huguette Borghino hardly pays any more attention to it. She knows her “By heart and from all angles”. When this 91-year-old resident arrived at Ehpad La Riviera in Mougins (Alpes-Maritimes), she moved to the third floor with her husband. When Alzheimer’s disease won its half “After seventy-one years of marriage”, she moved to a smaller room on the second, then the first. Last week, another move for Huguette Borghino: she now lives on the fourth, one of the two floors “Without Covid” of this private establishment managed by the Korian group. In the rest of the retirement home, the virus has taken its toll. Out of 109 residents, 36 have died since March 15, one of the heaviest casualties for nursing homes in France.

Mougins on 04/14/2020 La Riviera retirement home in Mougins. Huguette Broghino 91 years old resident uncontaminated by covid 19 in her bedroom.Huguette Bhorgino’s room, April 14. Photo Laurent Carré for Liberation

April 10, Korian, European number 1 in the sect

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Mathilde Frénois special envoy to Mougins (Alpes-Maritimes)

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Coronavirus: on Facebook, nurses organize their networks

Alice (1) and her friend met on the benches of nursing school. In 2018, they created an Instagram account dedicated to their profession. About Nursesvibes (almost 6,000 subscribers), we usually give tutorials to perform care, or we advise students on their orientation. However, since the start of the coronavirus epidemic, the program has radically changed. “We figured we should give voice to other nurses, caregivers and students, explains Alice, who works in the Paris region. It’s hard for us to confide in everything that’s going on. We work, it’s tiresome and stressful, then we go home, we watch TV, the news makes us angry and anger us … Even those around us sometimes find it difficult to listen to us. It’s an overflow. “ Nursesvibes is now relaying testimonies from nurses from all over France in the context of Covid-19. The first call for contributions has

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Lucie Ronfaut

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The psychologist explains the purchase of panic in the toilet paper

The death toll from coronavirus is increasing by the minute, global equity markets are losing billions of dollars and Australia appears to be on the cusp of a recession.

But the takeaway key from the week’s news is that people are crazy about their toilet paper.

The virus has caused thousands of victims worldwide, but has yet to be classified as a pandemic, with cases in Australia apparently focusing on the return of cruise ships, quarantine areas and a nursing home.

Yet fear has swept the nation, materializing in a hysterical wave of panicked food supplies.

RELATED: Misleading photo that contributed to mass panic

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RELATED: The Australian stock market suffers heavy losses again

Canned food, bleach and other essential household items have been torn but it is the empty shelves of toilet rolls that have captured the imagination of social media.

It was even rumored that a knife had been pulled into a battle for toilet paper reduction, while news sites from New York to London reported the toilet paper supermarket fight.

“Here are a few things and it’s therefore quite a complex problem,” clinical psychologist Dr Kn Knight told news.com.au.

“For whatever reason, and there may be some contributing factors, people are becoming quite anxious about COVID-19.”

Dr Knight, who is also president of the Australian Psychological Society, said the bizarre reaction is probably the result of worried consumers trying to appropriate an apparently defenseless endemic.

And he implored Australians to express their anxiety in a healthy way and instead focus on understanding the real dangers of the virus rather than unnecessary hysteria.

“If you are hearing about a virus that is causing a pandemic and killing people all over the world, if you hear the hype rather than the facts, then go” what will I do to protect myself? I could be stuck at home for a while, so I’ll make sure to stock up, “he said.

“Actually, of course, it is not necessary or at least certainly at this point. It is not an adequate response to the level of threat at the present time.”

Dr Knight says that both traditional and non-traditional media have a role to play in this.

Streem, a media monitoring group, released the data on Thursday revealing that the phrase “toilet paper” in coronavirus stories has increased by nearly 11,000% over the previous six weeks.

This type of dialogue contributed to the inappropriate response of a large part of the country to the real threat of the virus, he said.

Dr Knight says it’s okay for people to be a little anxious, but it’s important to proceed with a rational and well-informed response.

“And it’s really about sticking to the facts: accessing the website of the Department of Health or listening to the sources from which the fact came, not allowing yourself to be overwhelmed,” said Dr. Knight at news.com.au.

A Coles spokesman said the supermarket did not support the accumulation of goods and that the shelves were replenished regularly.

“Coles is committed to providing the best service to all Australians and during this challenged period it is committed to ensuring that all Australian communities have access to the products and services we all need. Coles wants to make sure that no matter where you live or how old you are, you have the same access as everyone else on your way. “

RELATED: Australian “Insecurity” in the Heart of the Toilet Paper Panic

Dr Gary Mortimer, Queensland University of Technology retail expert, said the shortage was exacerbated by the voluminous nature of some products and the inability of supermarkets to store them for long periods in warehouses.

“The challenge with toilet paper is that it comes in large, bulky packages and supermarkets can really only hold 150 to 200 packages in a corridor – those packages fill a corridor fairly quickly,” he explained.

“Since they hold very little toilet paper due to space restrictions, only 100 people are needed to enter and buy two packages instead of one, because suddenly the demand will increase by 100%.

“If you walk down the corridor of canned tuna you may see a couple of gaps but if you sell 200 packets of toilet paper, you will end up with an empty corridor that people think means a crisis without toilet paper anywhere. But there is toilet paper – it’s coming from the back door.

“They fill it up overnight and then run out at lunchtime.”

Ritchies Stores CEO Fred Harrison said that all of us have had a role to play in distilling panic.

“We need the public to be a little more responsible,” said the head of the supermarket in a statement given to news.com.au.

“We will not be isolated indoors for months: we will be able to go out and shop.

“There is no shortage of toilet rolls if people buy sensibly and there is absolutely no need for panic.

“Manufacturers can equip, but it takes time and it’s not something that can be fixed in 24 – 48 hours.”

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The Seattle nursing home is unable to test 65 workers with COVID-19 symptoms

SEATTLE (Reuters) – The nursing home in the Seattle area at the epicenter of one of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States said on Monday it had no kits to test 65 employees showing symptoms of the respiratory disease that killed at least 13 patients at the long-term care center.

A homemade sign and flowers from community members are seen near the entrance to the Kirkland Life Care Center, the long-term care facility linked to several confirmed cases of coronavirus in the state, in Kirkland, Washington, USA, March 9. 2020. REUTERS / David Ryder

The staff in question, who represent more than a third of the 180 employees of the treatment center, are suffering from symptoms consistent with the coronavirus and a federal team of nurses and doctors is helping to take care of 53 patients who remain in the center.

With the facility in the Kirkland suburb of Seattle accounting for over half of known coronavirus deaths in the United States, and all of its patients tested, it is unclear why Life Care lacked diagnostic kits for staff, even if the University of Washington has offered to process test samples for them.

“We would like more kits to test employees,” Life Care Center spokesman Tim Killian told reporters, adding that he did not know why they would not be available.

“We asked the various government agencies that provided us with test kits.”

Twenty-six of 120 patients who have resided in the nursing home since February 19 have died since then, with 13 out of 15 autopsies conducted so far confirming that coronavirus was the cause, Life Care officials said Monday. Among 53 residents still in the facility as of Monday, results for 31 of 35 tested have so far turned positive for coronavirus, they said.

The Seattle-King County Public Health Agency reported that three other Life Care residents have died in the past few days from coronavirus infections in local hospitals, bringing the total to 22 across the state. But it was not immediately clear whether such fatal accidents were already included in Life Care owning the latest figures.

Washington as a whole has documented 162 confirmed cases, one of the major findings of every single state in the United States. The national number has exceeded 600.

The outbreak has shown how quickly coronavirus can spread to the elderly with weak immune systems and basic health conditions living in confined spaces.

“We had patients who, within an hour, show no symptoms of going to acute symptoms and being transferred to the hospital,” Killian said in a press conference on Sunday. “And we have had patients who die relatively quickly under such circumstances.”

Two other nursing homes in the greater Seattle area have reported that at least two residents and one staff member have the virus.

Killian said he was not sure that nurses working at the Kirkland Life Care Center also worked in shifts in other nursing homes in the Seattle area before the epidemic came to light more than a week ago.

The University of Washington School of Medicine said Monday it could test all Life Care staff. Current laboratory tests are performed on around 500 samples per day, but has a capacity of over 1,000 tests per day.

“We are happy to run tests if they are able to obtain samples and send them through the Department of Laboratory Medicine of the University of Washington,” said Alex Greninger, assistant director of UW Medicine Clinical Virology Laboratories.

He didn’t know why Life Care hadn’t received the kits, but he said that a general reason why the tests weren’t higher was the lack of people to collect samples and take them to his university lab.

Reporting by Andrew Hay in New Mexico and Deborah Bloom in Seattle; Additional reports from Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; Editing by Peter Cooney and Michael Perry

Our standards:Thomson Reuters’ principles of trust.

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Nursing homes face unique challenges with Coronavirus – NBC Los Angeles

From Miami to Seattle, nursing homes and other facilities for the elderly host stocks of masks and thermometers, preparing staff shortages and checking visitors to protect a particularly vulnerable population from the coronavirus.

In China, where the epidemic started, the disease was basically deadly for the elderly. In Italy, the epicenter of the virus epidemic in Europe, the more than 100 people who died were elderly, suffering from other complications or both.

Of the 19 deaths in the United States since Saturday, at least 14 had been linked to a nursing home in the Seattle area, along with many other infections among residents, staff and family members. The Seattle Times reported that a second nursing home and a retired community in the area had reported a virus case.

This has alerted other structures in the United States, especially in states with large populations of older residents, such as Florida and California. About 2.5 million people live in long-term care facilities in the United States.

“For people over the age of 80 … the death rate could reach 15%,” said Mark Parkinson, president of the American Health Care Association nursing homes group.

The federal government is now focusing all inspections of nursing homes on infection control, identifying facilities in the city with confirmed cases and those previously mentioned for not following the protocol.

Federal regulations already require homes to have a specialist in preventing infections in staff, and many have already taken measures to deal with seasonal flow and other ailments that pose a greater risk to the elderly.

Even so, the response of structures to coronavirus has varied across the country.

In Florida, where some 160,000 seniors live in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, mandatory screening for visitors is not expected “because we are not at that point,” said Florida Health Care Association spokeswoman Kristen Knapp.

But aged care centers are posting signs that urge visitors to stay away if they have symptoms and are looking for alternative ways to connect to families, such as through video chats, Knapp said.

Concierges in the 14 Florida nursing homes managed by Palm Gardens Corporation are now offering all visitors a short questionnaire asking for information on symptoms, recent trips and contacts with others, said company vice president Luke Neumann.

Neumann said that nursing homes have also purchased additional thermometers in case they have to check visitors’ temperatures and accumulate preventive supplies, including medical masks, protective goggles and clothing. In laundries they make sure to use enough bleach and heat to kill any persistent viral germs, he said.

In the South Shore Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center south of Boston, patient Leo Marchand holds a container of disinfectant wipes on a shelf near the bed that he uses several times a day. The 71-year-old Vietnam veteran and retired truck driver has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which makes it difficult to breathe. The possibility of contracting the coronavirus scares him.

“It’s a concern,” said Marchand. “Really.”

Many facilities across the country have said they have trouble getting masks and medical clothes because of the shortage.

The more intense screening of visitors, meanwhile, isn’t going well with some.

“Some of the visitors have been quite reluctant to comply, and this has been stressful,” said Janet Snipes, executive director of Denver’s Holly Heights nursing center.

Under federal regulations, nursing homes are considered to be a patient’s residence and facilities want to keep them in contact with the family, especially when they are almost dead.

“I don’t think you can completely prevent visitors,” said Dr. David A. Nace, director of long-term care and flu programs at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine. Supervise 300 facilities in Pennsylvania.

For now, facilities in most states are underlining basic precautions, including hand washing and the cough tag.

Centers across the country are also trying to prepare staff for the worst.

An adult daycare center in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami purchased long-lasting ready meals in preparation for possible shortages. The Hebrew Home in Riverdale, New York is running nursing staff through exercises to see how they will handle situations in the 750-bed facility if the virus progresses. Their IT department is building an infrastructure to allow staff to work remotely if they get sick.

“If one of our sites has an outbreak, we will quickly run out of staff in that position,” said Randy Bury, CEO of The Good Samaritan Society, one of the largest nonprofit senior care providers in the country, with 19,000 employees in 24 states.

Some families are considering withdrawing loved ones from the facilities.

Kathleen Churchyard said her family decided to move her 80-year-old mother out of her retirement community near Jacksonville, Florida, and to her sister’s home nearby if the virus is confirmed in the area.

Churchyard, who lives in Concord, North Carolina, fears that her mother won’t take her seriously, and is particularly concerned about her dining room.

“I tried to get her to buy things to prepare … She said, ‘No. If (the virus) catches me, it takes it,'” said Churchyard.

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Associate associate writer Philip Marcelo in Rockland, Massachusetts contributed to this report.

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The Associated Press receives support for health and scientific coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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