Santos says Duque officials offer help for Trump’s re-election – Politics


Former President Juan Manuel Santos revealed that Officials of the government of President Iván Duque are “offering help” for the reelection in the United States of current President Donald Trump.

On Wednesday, during a discussion with the Colombian American Chamber of Commerce (AmCham) about his book An optimistic message for a world in crisis”, He also said that the The Democratic Party of the United States, Trump’s rival, warned that this behavior “is an illegal act.”

According to Santos in that conversation, he received a call from Washington in which they warned him that spokesmen of the Duque government are calling to offer aid to Trump’s re-election campaign.

(See also: ‘The Round’ after the controversy over the US mission)

“There is an aspect that worries me enormously, because they have called me from Washington and they have told me, you were the architect of bipartisan politics, there are spokesmen for the current Colombian government who are calling on the Trump campaign to see how they can help, ”said the former president.

“That is very serious,” added the ex-president, “because not only is it illegal, but it generates a reaction from the Democratic Party, which already knows that this happens. and breaks bipartisan politics. “

There are spokesmen for the current Government of Colombia who are calling on the Trump campaign to see how they can help

The former president also referred to the election of the new president of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and He said that this situation generates a strong impact in Latin America, since, according to Santos, the United States is imposing it with the approval of the Colombian Government.

(Read also: Reform the JEP? This says Juan Manuel Santos)

“The imposition of an American candidate in the IDB by the United States, with the help of Colombia, is generating cracks not only in the long term with an institution that we are all going to need, precisely after the pandemic, because we are going to need a lot of funding, but in the United States ”, Santos Calderón pointed out.

(Also read: Former President Santos comes out in defense of prosecutor Barbosa)

TIME

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The ‘Zurdo’ López underwent a catheterization and it is studied if they should operate

The former Junior Technician Miguel Ángel López was hospitalized last Monday morning at the Clínica del Caribe, after feeling discomfort and abnormal pressure.

The news was known through social networks, after one of his pupils in the rojiblanco team, former striker Martín Arzuaga, reported his health status through Twitter.

“Let us put in our prayers Professor Miguel Ángel López, who suffered an acute myocardial infarction,” wrote the ‘Toro’.

Until the closing of this edition, no official medical report was known about the state of health of the ‘Zurdo’.

The Argentine, champion with the Sharks in 2004, has been based in Barranquilla for several years.

Francisco Arias, who works as López’s assistant, assures that the 78-year-old veteran helmsman “is stable, calm and in good spirits”, waiting for what the doctors decide.

“Still under observation. They’ve already had a catheterization that resulted in a clogged artery. The possibility of open heart surgery or another type of intervention is being studied, ”Arias told EL HERALDO.

The former technician, according to Arias, remains in constant communication with those closest to him. His relatives in Argentina have already been informed and are aware of his health, like many of Junior’s fans who have a feeling of admiration and gratitude for the star he helped embroider on the shield in 2004.

In dialogue with EL HERALDO, a few months ago, ‘El Zurdo’ had sent a message of affection and gratitude to the rojiblanca fans, in the midst of confinement due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“I want to thank you for the affection that I always receive. I miss you. Thank you for making my days happy, ”said the historic Argentine coach at the time.

Miguel Ángel López was the coach of Junior’s fifth star in the second half of 2004, in that remembered final against Atlético Nacional, where the rojiblancos won 3-0 in the first leg, in Barranquilla, and then fell 5-2 in Medellín , saving himself in the last minutes with the remembered goal of Argentine defender Walter Ribonetto. The Sharks prevailed on penalties 5-4.

He directed the Barranquilla team on seven occasions. Without a doubt, he is a character that is 100% linked to junior history.

‘El Zurdo’ made his debut as a professional footballer at the University of Córdoba in 1962 and retired in 1975 at Atlético Nacional, a club where he made his debut as a coach a year later.

During his long coaching career, he has twice managed América de México, with whom he won two league titles in 1985 and a Concacaf Champions League in 1992.

He was also in the Independiente de Avellaneda, with which he raised the title of the South American Super Cup in 1995, and also in the Argentine Boca Juniors, Rosario Central, Ferro Carril Oeste and Arsenal.

He also went through the Mexican Chivas de Guadalajara, Santos Laguna, Toluca, León, Atlético Celaya and Puebla, as well as Al-Ahli from Saudi Arabia and Badajoz from Spain.

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The ‘Zurdo’ López underwent a catheterization and it is studied if they should operate

The former Junior Technician Miguel Ángel López was hospitalized last Monday morning at the Clínica del Caribe, after feeling discomfort and abnormal pressure.

The news was known through social networks, after one of his pupils in the rojiblanco team, former striker Martín Arzuaga, reported his health status through Twitter.

“Let us put in our prayers Professor Miguel Ángel López, who suffered an acute myocardial infarction,” wrote the ‘Toro’.

Until the closing of this edition, no official medical report was known about the state of health of the ‘Zurdo’.

The Argentine, champion with the Sharks in 2004, has been based in Barranquilla for several years.

Francisco Arias, who works as López’s assistant, assures that the 78-year-old veteran helmsman “is stable, calm and in good spirits”, waiting for what the doctors decide.

“Still under observation. They’ve already had a catheterization that resulted in a clogged artery. The possibility of open heart surgery or another type of intervention is being studied, ”Arias told EL HERALDO.

The former technician, according to Arias, remains in constant communication with those closest to him. His relatives in Argentina have already been informed and are aware of his health, like many of Junior’s fans who have a feeling of admiration and gratitude for the star he helped embroider on the shield in 2004.

In dialogue with EL HERALDO, a few months ago, ‘El Zurdo’ had sent a message of affection and gratitude to the rojiblanca fans, in the midst of confinement due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“I want to thank you for the affection that I always receive. I miss you. Thank you for making my days happy, ”said the historic Argentine coach at the time.

Miguel Ángel López was the coach of Junior’s fifth star in the second half of 2004, in that remembered final against Atlético Nacional, where the rojiblancos won 3-0 in the first leg, in Barranquilla, and then fell 5-2 in Medellín , saving himself in the last minutes with the remembered goal of Argentine defender Walter Ribonetto. The Sharks prevailed on penalties 5-4.

He directed the Barranquilla team on seven occasions. Without a doubt, he is a character that is 100% linked to junior history.

‘El Zurdo’ made his debut as a professional footballer at the University of Córdoba in 1962 and retired in 1975 at Atlético Nacional, a club where he made his debut as a coach a year later.

During his long coaching career, he has twice managed América de México, with whom he won two league titles in 1985 and a Concacaf Champions League in 1992.

He was also in the Independiente de Avellaneda, with which he raised the title of the South American Super Cup in 1995, and also in the Argentine Boca Juniors, Rosario Central, Ferro Carril Oeste and Arsenal.

He also went through the Mexican Chivas de Guadalajara, Santos Laguna, Toluca, León, Atlético Celaya and Puebla, as well as Al-Ahli from Saudi Arabia and Badajoz from Spain.

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The remains of the governor’s council are transferred to the Sierra Nevada

A helicopter from the Aviation and Air Assault Division of the First Division of the National Army transferred the remains of the governor’s council José de los Santos Sauna Limaco to the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, who died from the coronavirus.

“The humanitarian support of the National Army consisted of mobilizing from Santa Marta to the Kogui community, in Pueblo Nuevo, the mortal remains of the indigenous governor, to be buried according to the cultural traditions of his community,” the authorities explained in a statement.

The coffin of the Kogui governor council and Legal Representative of the Gonawindua Tayrona organization was transported through the external load mode, or by external basket, a technique used by pilots who are experts in this type of transfer.

“It is important to specify that this transfer was carried out in compliance with the final disposal of corpses of deceased persons associated with COVID-19 of the health authorities, as well as the guaranteed biosafety and safe packaging conditions of the funeral service,” said the First Division.

In the document, the Army the death of the governor council Santos Sauna, and clarified that they are willing to provide humanitarian support to those who need it.

The death of the indigenous leader occurred on Thursday, August 6 at the El Prado Clinic in Santa Marta, where he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit since Saturday, August 1 because of the coronavirus.

The District Health Secretariat explained the relatives of the governor’s council indicated that they did not have a positive person for COVID-19, however, in the month of July, when he already presented symptoms such as chills and fever, José de los Santos Sauna Limaco participated in several meetings with Mamos de la Sierra in the community of Pueblo Viejo and La Loma, municipality of Dibulla, La Guajira.

Faced with this situation, officials of the District Health Secretariat delivered 20 kits of personal protection elements, which contain latex gloves, gowns, overalls, N95 face masks, mono glasses, masks and a guide with instructions for their use, in order to protect the relatives of the deceased.

“The indigenous authorities were given self-care recommendations that they should implement during the process of final disposition of the body of José de los Santos Sauna Limaco, such as social distancing,” the authorities said.

Through his Twitter account, the former president and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Juan Manuel Santos, lamented the departure of the indigenous leader.

“I deeply regret the death of the Governing Council Kogui José de los Santos Sauna, who was a great friend for many years. My solidarity for the peoples of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta on this sad day ”.

For its part, the Territorial Council of Indigenous Cabildos stressed that “his legacy for the protection of the heart of the world, unity and peace will remain forever.”

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“In the future, food will be seen as medicine”

The Empty Chair: I would like you to explain to us what the current situation of food systems is and what will happen if we continue with the inertia that we bring, before we start this conversation talking about how we are going to feed ourselves in 10 years.

Maria Elena Varas: We have a challenge. By 2050 we will have to feed 9.5 billion people on this planet, and several studies have indicated that as long as we continue to produce at this speed, and in this way, there will be a very negative effect on the environment.

But, in addition, we are not going to be able to feed all those people in a way that is nutritious and healthy.

So, here is a vision and a push and a whole agenda to be able to change the way we produce these foods, how they are distributed and how to empower consumers so that they can make better decisions regarding the demand for food.

The Empty Chair: Given these trends, how might food production change in the future?

Maria Elena Varas: Production cannot be viewed in a fragmented way, without associating it with demand. That is why we are here looking at production systems that are kinder to the environment; that generate less carbon emissions, that do not destroy soils so that they can be used again, that have a sustainable use of water.

Also a production that is aligned with climate change, because with the changes in temperature, and the external shocks that exist in climatic terms, there is great pressure for this type of food.

The Empty Chair: Are we going to have more hydroponic crops or more organic crops?

Maria Elena Varas: There is a tendency to, on the one hand, make better use of inputs such as fertilizers, for example, which affect less land use and water pollution.

On the other hand, productive systems that make better use of the land in terms of not encouraging deforestation.

There are initiatives in Colombia that are interesting, from that perspective, and address livestock production more specifically there, for example. It changes a bit depending on the type of crop and the geographical area.

The Empty Chair: Does that mean that the peasants of the future are going to be more technological?

Maria Elena Varas: Absolutely. The idea would be to be able to empower small and medium farmers to adopt different technologies and innovations that allow them to produce in a more efficient and also more environmentally friendly way. That for the rest, is completely related to the use of the soils that they themselves have.

The Empty Chair: Is there someone already doing that right now?

Maria Elena Varas: We have examples from Asia, in India, some in Africa, in Latin America too, where drones, new computer technologies, blockchain have been used. I believe that is the future.

But the big question is, how can we support the creation of a favorable financial environment for farmers to adopt these technologies? Because what we know is that the technologies exist and are there, but the problem is financing. So, how to generate a change and a transformation to be able to finance the adoption of these technologies? And that’s a great point that we are working on.

The Empty Chair: You, too, place great value on consumers in this transformation of food systems.

Maria Elena Varas: Consumers play a fundamental role in terms of their demand for food. An effect is generated towards the field, as to what is produced. And there are different issues to address.

One is a matter of communication and recognition of the value that food has on the health of the person. Being able to work around, for example, the issue of obesity, and the issue of those who do not have enough food. That is a fundamental issue.

The other issue is empowering consumers so they can know where their products come from. And therefore, that the decisions they make are informed from the perspective of nutrition, but also from that of the environment.

In other words, that my products are from areas where deforestation has not been done, that my products are healthy, that they are not contaminated.

For which we also return to the subject of technology. Where can we use traceability and different technologies to be able to do that, to make those changes, and to be able to inform consumers?

The Empty Chair: Do you imagine that the consumer of the future before eating an apple will look at a stamp that tells them the origin of that apple, if they treat the workers well, if they deforest or not deforest in that area?

Maria Elena Varas: Consumption in the future would ideally be that way, and in that case you would be completely empowering the consumer to make changes in the supply chain as well. That would be interesting and good to see.

But also a consumer who may be able to say ‘I am going to diversify my diet’, I will recognize that I have to move towards a diet more similar to what the EAT-Lancet report published last year, in terms of lower consumption of meat, higher consumption of grains, fruits and vegetables. That it can also support a more responsible consumption for the environment and for health.

The Empty Chair: Younger people are becoming more vegan. Do you think that trend is going to continue?

Maria Elena Varas: I could not tell you, because the truth is that the trend we see in China, for example, and especially in countries where greater purchasing power is generated with economic development, the trend is precisely to consume more meat. There is an association of economic stratum with the consumption of pork and beef.

In this sense, there are trends in other countries that generate pressure in the production chain. To give you an example: the pressure generated by China with its demand for livestock production that takes place in Brazil, from where they import meat. So I think there are going to be different curves.

But I do believe that there is greater awareness, and that greater awareness will continue to be generated, of the importance of food in health. A trend towards food as medicine.

The Empty Chair: Now one sees juices to cleanse the body, etc. Will that trend gain strength?

Maria Elena Varas: I think it is a trend that is going to gain more strength, because there are also specific interests to address these issues. The costs for the health system, and fiscal of the countries of the challenges that are generated by the bad feeding are astronomical.

The levels of diabetes in developed countries, of obesity that are also seen in Latin America, where it really is an epidemic at this point, are a great challenge in terms of public policies. From that perspective, there should be a major change.

Companies, from small to multinational companies, are making a transition towards products that appeal to the new consumer’s need to consume healthier, more health-positive foods.

The Empty Chair: Do you think that every time we are going to consume more local to be more friendly with the environment?

Maria Elena Varas: Of course, precisely, there are several visions as to how this future could be, and I would say that there is a vision in terms of consuming more locally. Partly because there is a carbon footprint issue that is important to address.

But also, a tendency to have access to food that is fresher; that have been produced in areas where the community and the local economy are also being supported.

Something that is also important, for example, is how we can do that from the perspective of small vertical farms and everything that is food production in cities, which is also a huge issue in the context of all the actors that we are in the food themes.

The Empty Chair: A few years ago it seemed that technology was going more towards the artificialization of food, than towards organic. Is organic going to beat chemical?

Maria Elena Varas: I believe that one thing may exist alongside the other as long as the consumer remains as it is until now. But to the extent that greater awareness and movement in the demand for these types of products is generated, there will be a change there.

Organic, 100 percent pure organic, has specific challenges also when we are talking about international trade and other issues, but I believe that it will generate a positive change, ideally, in terms of local consumption and the more organic consumption of fruits. and vegetables. The food basket today is highly based on processed and packaged products.

The Empty Chair: What do you think that food basket will be like in 10 years?

Maria Elena Varas: I can tell you what I would like to see. I would like to see more nuts, almonds, more fruit and more vegetables. And also more variety of each, only one serving of meat a week. And if I’m not mistaken, one or two servings of fish a week, which is the diet recommended by the EAT-Lancet report. It is not cheap, but such a diet would address the needs of the body and the planet.

The Empty Chair: If that diet is the one that is imposed, a country like Colombia would have great opportunities.

Maria Elena Varas: Justly. In the case of Colombia, with the wealth it has in terms of biodiversity and the number of native products, it could lead to a healthier system. There are various initiatives that are working on this issue in the country.

The Empty Chair: Although you are Chilean, you know Colombia well. How do you think rural life can change here, which has not been easy in recent decades?

Maria Elena Varas: I believe that there are great opportunities to align various initiatives that are going on in the country to generate better and greater opportunities for rural areas, supporting practices that are sustainable through technical training systems, monitoring.

Also, at the same time, to be able to work on crops that support the transition towards more nutritious and healthy foods, incorporating native products or others that are important for the development of the country: certain types of mango, avocado, Amazonian cocoa and other products that in this minute I forgot the name because they are very typical of Colombia. I think there is a possibility there.

And the other thing, which I think there is an important possibility, is in terms of being able to generate more investment in infrastructure that can help these small producers.

In short, helping along the entire food chain to reduce losses and waste, which is a great challenge for Colombian production and will continue to be a great challenge as we continue to see issues of climate change that are to continue affecting the crops.

The Empty Chair: In Colombia, is a lot of food lost?

Maria Elena Varas: Yes, before it can reach the warehouse and be distributed to the points of sale. Many times due to lack of capacity of cold storage mechanisms; due to road infrastructure problems; by transportation issues; different aspects for which it would be important to generate more investment so that these foods can reach the points of sale, or the processing points in an appropriate way, and on time.

The Empty Chair: And the last question that cannot be missed: how does the pandemic affect this future?

Maria Elena Varas: Well, the truth is that the pandemic has been a reminder that there is much to be done here, that there is an important issue in terms of food safety that must continue to be addressed. That is, the point of putting food on the table of people, beyond any other type of agenda, and the importance of continuing to work on more resilient systems.

Some time ago I heard an interview that seemed interesting to me, it said: “five years ago what should we have done to avoid what has happened to us today on the subject of food”, and perhaps it would be good to think then, what can we do today to avoid what could be another external shock in five or 10 years.

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