For wine to Znojmo. The historic vintage will replace Vinařské T (r) ipy this year

“Despite the fact that we cannot organize the Znojmo Vintage due to government measures, we present Vinařská T®ipy together with the winemakers. Open cellars and tastings will be offered on the weekend of September 11-13 by winemakers from Hnanice and Šatov, Konice and Popice, Vrbovec, Božice, Nový Šaldorf, Havraníky, Chvalovice or also from Znovín Znojmo and Vinařství Lahofer, “said František Koudela, director of Znojemská Beseda.

A unique event of this format will be in the Znojmo region for the first time. “Thanks to the size and scope, there will be no accumulation of a huge number of visitors, and in addition to the wine menu, they will also be able to enjoy the music and accompanying program,” added Koudela.

All winemakers are looking forward to the guests. “Already in June, it occurred to us that if the Vintage was not in Znojmo, we would make open cellars. Other colleagues also joined, “said one of the organizers from Hnanice, Josef Kořínek.

Although many imagine the festivities associated with the procession of King John of Luxembourg under vintage, it is the celebration of the harvest and harvest of the vines that hides beneath it. “The weather, which this year is characterized by alternating cold and warm days and nights, predetermines that this year’s wines will be pleasantly aromatic, especially Sauvignon, Müller Thurgau, Tramín červený, Veltlínské zelené and all nutmeg varieties,” said Pavel Vajčner, Chairman of the Board of Znovín Znojmo.

By joint promotion of partial events and the program, the organizers want to satisfy locals and visitors who have planned a trip to Znojmo in this period and who, for example, already have booked accommodation. “We really have a lot of questions about the alternative program instead of the vintage, and this offer will be the answer for us,” added Koudela. An overview of all events can be found on the website of Znojemská Beseda and at individual associations and wineries.

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Despite new donor law, it is unlikely that your organs will be reused NOW

The coming into effect of the new donor law next Wednesday means that anyone who does not register after September automatically gives permission for organ donation. Nevertheless, the chance that a donor is actually used for organ or tissue transplantation remains small: 1 in 200. How about that?

The main reason that organ donation is so rare is that an organ donor almost always has to die in hospital intensive care. In addition, the organs must also be suitable for transplantation.

Azam Nurmohamed works at the Amsterdam UMC as an internist-nephrologist, a doctor who specializes in kidney diseases and focuses on kidney transplants.

“Most importantly, organs that are taken out are viable,” he says. “When someone dies, body cells decay. There is no more blood circulation, so that organs are no longer perfused. Especially when the body is at room temperature, decay goes very quickly. After three quarters to an hour, organs are usually no longer usable” .

Delay choice because of coronavirus

  • The new donor law means that every adult, who does not record her or his choice in the donor register, gives automatic permission for organ donation. Because of the corona crisis, the Dutch have had until September to pass on their choice.

Donor almost always dies on ic

In practice, the bottom line is that organ donors almost always die in an intensive care unit and not even in a normal ward of a hospital. Only on the ICU are patients so strictly monitored and continuously monitored that doctors can remove organs in time.

And even then, many deceased IC patients are not suitable for donation. In principle, patients with cancer or an active infection cannot be used, explains Nurmohamed. “You could then transplant malignant cells or the infection, that should never be the intention.”

Age also plays a role. “As you get older, you start to notice flaws. Not only in your muscle strength and condition, but also the organ function can deteriorate. Old organs usually do less well than young organs.”

According to him, an age limit cannot be linked to this, partly because it differs per body. “We rarely use kidneys from deceased donors aged 75 or older,” he says.

Small group of suitable donors remains

What you are left with suitable donors is a “very small group”, mainly IC patients, who often die after a major accident or a heart attack, cerebral haemorrhage or stroke and are dependent on a respirator and medication. This keeps the heart pumping and blood flowing.

Doctors start thinking about organ donation when an IC patient can no longer recover and there is no point in further treatment.

A doctor may then check whether the patient is in the donor register. If this is not the case, she will discuss whether he can take place with the family or organ donation.

A surgeon, together with an extraction team, performs the operation. The donor’s body then returns to the next of kin. (Photo: Getty Images)

Facts and numbers

  • Almost half (49 percent) of all Dutch people over the age of eighteen were registered in the donor register on 2 January.
  • Of these more than 6.9 million people, 55 percent were donors. 34 percent did not consent to donation, and 11 percent left that choice to a surviving relative or designated person.
  • More women (53 percent) than men (43 percent) had registered in the donor register at the beginning of this year. Women also give permission for organ donation more often than men.
  • Almost three-quarters of eighteen and nineteen-year-olds were not yet registered in January.
  • 72 percent of people with a non-western migration background were not in the donor register. More so than for people with a western migration background (64 percent) and with a Dutch background (45 percent).
  • Source: Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), June 2020.

In theory, donor can save eight lives

If there is permission for donation, doctors must determine the death. This is the case if the heart is no longer beating or if the patient is brain dead. Strict rules apply to that decision and there are always several doctors involved.

Once death has been established with certainty, suitable recipients are sought. Donor surgery takes about four to six hours to start. In the meantime, suitable recipients are sought and doctors ensure that the donor’s body remains at the proper temperature for donation.

On average, three organs are used, according to figures from the Dutch Transplantation Foundation (NTS). In principle, a person can save eight lives (heart, liver, pancreas, small intestine, two lungs and two kidneys), but this is rare in practice.

According to Nurmohamed, there is almost always a recipient for a good quality organ. Eurotransplant, a transplant network between eight European countries, including the Netherlands, links donors to recipients.

150 patients on waiting list die each year

Last year, 1,271 Dutch people were on the waiting list for an organ, according to annual figures from the NTS. The vast majority of patients (831) waited for a kidney, followed by a lung (172), liver (135), heart (116) or pancreas (46).

On the other hand, organ donors save 800 patients every year. However, it is not the case that most of the waiting list is then helped. After all, new people are constantly being added to the list. About 150 people die each year while on the waiting list.

This waiting list works differently for every body. For kidneys, for example, it does not work as a queue where someone starts at the back and everyone shifts a spot with each transplant. Kidney patients who have been on dialysis for a long time or who have the best DNA match are more likely to be offered a kidney.

‘New donor law creates awareness’

The new donor law will not increase the group of potential suitable donors. The likelihood that a deceased donor will actually donate organs may change, says Nurmohamed. The most important thing, he says, is that the law will “raise public awareness”.

“Because everyone’s choice will soon be determined, relatives and doctors will be less burdened with the difficult decision whether or not a deceased can donate,” said the kidney specialist.

.

Despite new donor law, it is unlikely that your organs will be reused NOW

The coming into effect of the new donor law next Wednesday means that anyone who does not register after September automatically gives permission for organ donation. Nevertheless, the chance that a donor is actually used for organ or tissue transplantation remains small: 1 in 200. How about that?

The main reason that organ donation is so rare is that an organ donor almost always has to die in hospital intensive care. In addition, the organs must also be suitable for transplantation.

Azam Nurmohamed works at the Amsterdam UMC as an internist-nephrologist, a doctor who specializes in kidney diseases and focuses on kidney transplants.

“Most importantly, organs that are taken out are viable,” he says. “When someone dies, body cells decay. There is no more blood circulation, so that organs are no longer perfused. Especially when the body is at room temperature, decay goes very quickly. After three quarters to an hour, organs are usually no longer usable” .

Delay choice because of coronavirus

  • The new donor law means that every adult, who does not record her or his choice in the donor register, gives automatic permission for organ donation. Because of the corona crisis, the Dutch have had until September to pass on their choice.

Donor almost always dies on ic

In practice, the bottom line is that organ donors almost always die in an intensive care unit and not even in a normal ward of a hospital. Only on the ICU are patients so strictly monitored and continuously monitored that doctors can remove organs in time.

And even then, many deceased IC patients are not suitable for donation. In principle, patients with cancer or an active infection cannot be used, explains Nurmohamed. “You could then transplant malignant cells or the infection, that should never be the intention.”

Age also plays a role. “As you get older, you start to notice flaws. Not only in your muscle strength and condition, but also the organ function can deteriorate. Old organs usually do less well than young organs.”

According to him, an age limit cannot be linked to this, partly because it differs per body. “We rarely use kidneys from deceased donors aged 75 or older,” he says.

Small group of suitable donors remains

What you are left with suitable donors is a “very small group”, mainly IC patients, who often die after a major accident or a heart attack, cerebral haemorrhage or stroke and are dependent on a respirator and medication. This keeps the heart pumping and blood flowing.

Doctors start thinking about organ donation when an IC patient can no longer recover and there is no point in further treatment.

A doctor may then check whether the patient is in the donor register. If this is not the case, she will discuss whether he can take place with the family or organ donation.

A surgeon, together with an extraction team, performs the operation. The donor’s body then returns to the next of kin. (Photo: Getty Images)

Facts and numbers

  • Almost half (49 percent) of all Dutch people over the age of eighteen were registered in the donor register on 2 January.
  • Of these more than 6.9 million people, 55 percent were donors. 34 percent did not consent to donation, and 11 percent left that choice to a surviving relative or designated person.
  • More women (53 percent) than men (43 percent) had registered in the donor register at the beginning of this year. Women also give permission for organ donation more often than men.
  • Almost three-quarters of eighteen and nineteen-year-olds were not yet registered in January.
  • 72 percent of people with a non-western migration background were not in the donor register. More so than for people with a western migration background (64 percent) and with a Dutch background (45 percent).
  • Source: Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), June 2020.

In theory, donor can save eight lives

If there is permission for donation, doctors must determine the death. This is the case if the heart is no longer beating or if the patient is brain dead. Strict rules apply to that decision and there are always several doctors involved.

Once death has been established with certainty, suitable recipients are sought. Donor surgery takes about four to six hours to start. In the meantime, suitable recipients are sought and doctors ensure that the donor’s body remains at the proper temperature for donation.

On average, three organs are used, according to figures from the Dutch Transplantation Foundation (NTS). In principle, a person can save eight lives (heart, liver, pancreas, small intestine, two lungs and two kidneys), but this is rare in practice.

According to Nurmohamed, there is almost always a recipient for a good quality organ. Eurotransplant, a transplant network between eight European countries, including the Netherlands, links donors to recipients.

150 patients on waiting list die each year

Last year, 1,271 Dutch people were on the waiting list for an organ, according to annual figures from the NTS. The vast majority of patients (831) waited for a kidney, followed by a lung (172), liver (135), heart (116) or pancreas (46).

On the other hand, organ donors save 800 patients every year. However, it is not the case that most of the waiting list is then helped. After all, new people are constantly being added to the list. About 150 people die each year while on the waiting list.

This waiting list works differently for every body. For kidneys, for example, it does not work as a queue where someone starts at the back and everyone shifts a spot with each transplant. Kidney patients who have been on dialysis for a long time or who have the best DNA match are more likely to be offered a kidney.

‘New donor law creates awareness’

The new donor law will not increase the group of potential suitable donors. The likelihood that a deceased donor will actually donate organs may change, says Nurmohamed. The most important thing, he says, is that the law will “raise public awareness”.

“Because everyone’s choice will soon be determined, relatives and doctors will be less burdened with the difficult decision whether or not a deceased can donate,” said the kidney specialist.

.

Where to go within 100 km? 52 weekends in France: Weekend ideas

© Adobe Stock

Obliged to leave near you? Here is a selection of 52 escapades within 100 km of the capitals of the 13 regions of France, to do for a weekend or a day. Biking through the vineyards, (re) discovering the treasures of our heritage, staying at the beach or hiking in the countryside… we are lucky not to have to go far, in the end!

Where to go within 100 km of Paris?

Where to go within 100 km of Paris?
Provins © s4svisuals – stock.adobe.com

Auvers-sur-Oise (34 km)

Located 30 minutes from Paris, Auvers sur Oise was a source of inspiration for the great masters of impressionism, in particular Van Gogh (Please note, Auberge Ravoux is closed until 2021!). It is also a picturesque little town, which can be easily explored on foot. Museums, castle and 17th century garden are on the program, as well as walks in the Val-d’Oise… Read Auvers-sur-Oise, in the footsteps of the Impressionists

Compiègne and its forest (77 km)

A weekend where nature blends with culture. Between the Palais de Compiègne, the Château de Pierrefonds and superb nature walks, the Compiègne forest and its surroundings are a destination of choice for savoring spring in the Oise, north of Paris. Read Compiègne and its forest, a royal weekend.

Provins (88 km)

Ready for a trip back in time? Direction Seine-et-Marne at Provins, whose medieval city was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2001. The Porte de Jouy, the César tower, the Saint-Quiriace collegiate church, the tithe barn or the underground passages are a must to visit, without forgetting the rose garden!

Chartres (89 km)

The prefecture of Eure-et-Loir is famous for its cathedral and its medieval alleys. Listed as a World Heritage Site since 1979, Notre-Dame is one of the largest Gothic buildings in France. But this city with crazy charm also harbors some unexpected nuggets, to be discovered in unusual Chartres.

Where to go within 100 km of Rouen?

Where to go within 100 km of Rouen?
Honfleur © djekker – stock.adobe.com

Around Rouen: the loops of the Seine (40 km)

Of Andelys (Eure) at Villequier (Seine-Maritime), along the Seine … Getaways in the shade of apple trees, in the footsteps of the Impressionists, the monks of Jumièges and Victor Hugo, along the river. Read Normandy, over the loops of the Seine.

Gerberoy and the country of Bray (62 km)

Gerberoy, little gem of the Oise, is one of the most beautiful villages in France. All around, the Pays de Bray invites you to a delicious bucolic and gourmet break in unspoiled landscapes. Small charming towns, groves, abbeys, cycle paths and beautiful hikes… A pretty corner of France, for sure! Read Le pays de Bray with the Routard.

Étretat and the Alabaster coast (71 to 89 km)

Happy Normans who live near one of the iconic sites of France! Étretat, its cliffs, its beach, its village, its walks facing the sea and, on the Alabaster coast, the welcoming fishing port of Fecamp. Read Étretat and Fécamp, Normandy, cliff side

Honfleur and the Fleurie coast (78 to 94 km)

The Côte fleurie is not stingy with beautiful beaches, starting with that of Deauville, immortalized by A man and a woman by Claude Lelouch. And then, on the way, there is the lovely fishing port of Honfleur, which we never tire of, and the surrounding countryside. Cabourg la Proustienne must be left aside, it is too far (111 km).

Where to go within 100 km of Lille?

Where to go within 100 km of Lille?
Arras © david debray – stock.adobe.com

Walk in the mining basin, around Lens (37 km)

The Louvre remains closed? Take comfort, it’s not just the Louvre in Lens. The region of the major sites of the Mining Basin, listed as World Heritage by Unesco, has great surprises in store such as the Lewarde Historic Mining Center, which pays tribute to miners, or, in another genre, the impressive Chartreuse Museum in Douai. Read Around the Louvre-Lens.

Arras (52 km)

The Pas-de-Calais prefecture has more than one asset! The Flemish Baroque style of the Place des Héros and the Grand-Place, the town hall and its belfry or the Saint-Vaast abbey will delight lovers of architecture. Also worth visiting: the underground passages, called Boves, old cellars and quarries then laid out by the British. Arras will seduce you for sure!

Dunkirk and the dunes of Flanders (75 km)

Over fifteen km along the North Sea, from the gates of Dunkirk to the Belgian border, an exceptional set of dunes that can be discovered via marked trails during the most invigorating walks!

Le Cateau-Cambrésis, in the footsteps of Matisse (81 km)

This is where the third Matisse museum in France is located. In the region, walks allow you to discover the young years of the painter. The opportunity to revisit the North through the entry of artists, between Cambrai and Valenciennes, via Douai. Read In the North, in the footsteps of Matisse

Where to go within 100 km of Orleans?

Where to go within 100 km of Orleans?
Briare canal bridge © Marco Cuchel – stock.adobe.com

Blois and Chambord (58 km)

These castles, which are no longer presented, are among the treasures of the Loire Valley. Unmissable! But the city of Blois also has its nuggets to savor during a stroll through its alleys. As for Chambord, surrounded by an exceptional forest estate, it is also a superb destination for nature walks.

Sologne around Romorantin-Lanthenay (68 km)

Between forests, ponds, rivers and small villages, a fascinating region for lovers of nature and wildlife. Also stop at the Deer House in Villeny or in Lamotte-Beuvron, birthplace of the famous Tatin tart!

Vendôme and the Loir Valley (75 km)

Former capital of the county of Vendôme, the city is home to the Vendôme trinity, a Benedictine abbey classified as a Historic Monument. From there, you can go up the Loir valley by visiting the castle of Châteaudun or by following in the footsteps of Proust at Illiers-Combray. Read The Loir Valley with the Routard.

The Loire à Vélo, to Briare (78 km)

The famous Loire à Vélo cycle route passes through Orléans. Upstream, from the canal bridge of Briare, Passing by Sully-sur-Loire and its castle, you can enjoy a beautiful bike ride through the Loiret. Read the Loire by bike, all in the saddle!

Where to go within 100 km of Rennes?

Where to go within 100 km of Rennes?
Rochefort-en-Terre © Florence Piot – Fotolia

Paimpont and the Brocéliande forest (42 km)

Just ¾ h from Rennes, enter the myth by hiking! This Breton forest may be called Paimpont on the cards, everyone designates it by its mythical name: Brocéliande, forever linked to King Arthur, the Knights of the Round Table and the enchanting Merlin. Read Brocéliande, forest of legends

Mont-Saint-Michel and its bay (68 km)

What better way to celebrate your newfound freedom than to greet this icon of France? After visiting this sublime site, the region of the bay of Mont-Saint-Michel is available to you: walks by the sea, hikes in the hinterland, gourmet stops in the villages are waiting for you. Read the Pays de la Baie du Mont-Saint-Michel with the Routard.

The interior of Morbihan, around Redon (58 to 81 km)

The hinterland of Morbihan is full of treasures: picturesque villages like Rochefort-en-Terre, medieval fortresses, beautiful gardens like that of La Gacilly, bucolic landscapes along the Nantes-Brest canal. All to discover on foot, by bike or by boat in “slow” mode. Read Le Morbihan, land side.

The Emerald Coast from Cancale to Saint-Cast-le-Guildo (71 to 91 km)

Taste oysters at Cancale, walk the ramparts of Saint Malo, succumb to the medieval charm of Dinan and the good life of Dinard, tread the sand of the beaches of Saint-Cast-le-Guildo… The Emerald Coast, a concentrate of intense pleasures. Read Saint-Malo and Dinard, elegant Bretonnes

Where to go within 100 km of Nantes?

Where to go within 100 km of Nantes?
Noirmoutier © Thierry RYO – stock.adobe.com

The Pays de Retz, from the lake of Grand-Lieu to Pornic (31 to 51 km)

South of the Loire estuary, the Pays de Retz is best known for its Côte de Jade and its jewels Pornic and Saint-Brévin. But this ocean region can also be visited from the inside, on the Breton swamp and lake of Grand-Lieu. On foot, by bike, on horseback, by canoe, you will be delighted… Read Le Pays de Retz.

Guérande and the Brière regional natural park (60 to 78 km)

Loire-Atlantique can also be visited on the marsh side. There are of course Guérande and its famous salt, but also the Briere Park neighbour. The second largest swamp in France after the Camargue, it is home to abundant flora and fauna that will delight nature lovers. Read the Loire-Atlantique marsh side

Angers (87 km)

The capital of Anjou is a digest of sweet France. In the center, the cobbled streets conceal remarkable monuments, starting with the medieval castle. But Angers is not only based on its historical heritage: renowned vineyards, festivals and art galleries also make it a city to live in. Read Angers, very gently

Noirmoutier Island (89 km)

Off the Vendée, Noirmoutier is appreciated for its beaches, its vast salt marshes, natural reserves, wood – including the Bois de la Chaise, painted by Renoir -, the astonishing Passage du Gois, the castle-museum (12th century) and the old streets of Noirmoutier- en-l’Île… Without forgetting its salt and potato!

Where to go within 100 km of Bordeaux?

Where to go within 100 km of Bordeaux?
Saint-Emilion © milosk50 – Adobe Stock

Saint-Emilion (40 km)

The quintessence of French medieval villages: steep and cobbled alleys, ramparts, Gothic church … But also a surprising underground heritage: galleries, catacombs … And, of course, the vineyard of Saint Emilion that makes epicureans around the world dream!

Arcachon bay and Pilat dune (65 km)

The seaside charm ofArcachon, oysters and boat trips in the basin, the cap ferret and the rise of dune du Pilat… So many great classics that we never get tired of! Read The Arcachon basin, of the four seasons

Biscarrosse (83 km)

Sea side or lake side, the Landes resort of Biscarrosse is a seaside paradise. Walks on foot and by bike in the forest and on the beach, discovery of the large lagoon-colored lakes and tasting of good local products, enough to make a successful weekend… Read Biscarrosse and Mimizan, the Landes seaside

The Deux-Mers Canal by bike, estuary side or around Marmande (95 km)

Two different faces of this superb cycle route. From Mortagne-sur-Gironde, maritime landscapes precede the wine lands around Blaye. On the side of Marmande, the greenway that runs along the lateral canal to the Garonne crosses the bucolic garden of Aquitaine, paradise of strawberries, asparagus and tomatoes. Read The 2 Seas Canal by bike with the Routard

Where to go within 100 km of Toulouse?

Where to go within 100 km of Toulouse?
Albi © stephanemedina81 – stock.adobe.com

Montauban and Moissac (from 53 to 71 km)

Listed as a “City of Art and History”, the superb city of pink bricks Montauban saw the birth of the painter Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres and the sculptor Antoine Bourdelle to whom a must-see museum is dedicated. After direction Moissac, to admire its superb cloister.

Les Portes de Gascogne (from 51 to 99 km)

In the east of the Gers, the Portes de Gascogne open with generosity to the curious, travelers and lovers of good food. Of Lectoure at Simorre, Passing by Gimont or Fleurance, in Lomagne or in Savès, beautiful country houses, hikes, gourmet markets, churches await you … Read Les Portes de Gascogne with the Routard

Albi (76 km)

One of the most beautiful cities in France, with its cathedral, its Toulouse-Lautrec museum, its bridges over the Tarn, Albi, the red, classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its Episcopal City, is also a delight for the senses with the gourmet delights of its market and the mildness of its climate. Read Albi, in majesty red and Albi and the Tarn, in the footsteps of Toulouse-Lautrec

The country of Mirepoix (80 km)

Northeast of Ariège, Mirepoix is one of the most beautiful country houses in the Southwest with its colorful half-timbered houses (some from the 15the century), its market and the old Saint-Maurice cathedral. On the way, stop at the astonishing semi-cave church of Vals, and a hook by Castelnaudary to taste a busty cassoulet! Read Ariège, mountains and wonders

Where to go within 100 km of Marseille?

Where to go within 100 km of Marseille?
Camargue © Richard Semik – Adobe Stock

Hyères and the Giens peninsula (82 to 92 km)

Hyeres, one of the oldest seaside resorts in France, has retained its beautiful villas and languid beaches. A tombolo leads to the Giens peninsula and its magnificent coves with a view of the coast and the Hyères islands. Read Hyères and the Giens peninsula

The land of Baux-de-Provence (84 km)

Superb Provençal village perched, The Baux de Provence is at the heart of a territory with multiple attractions: shows of Careers of Lights, landscapes of Val d’Enfer, ancient site of Glanum, sweetness of Saint-Rémy without forgetting the vineyards and olive groves of the Alpilles Regional Natural Park. Read Around Les Baux-de-Provence.

Arles and the Camargue (86 km)

Arenas in cloister of Saint-Trophime, a Mecca for Romanesque art Arles forms an open-air history book. It is also a cultural city of its time with the Actes Sud editions and the photography festival. And, at its doors, the great spaces of the Camargue, between rice fields, bulls and flamingos: an invitation to travel to the heart of the Bouches-du-Rhône!

The Luberon, around Gordes (94 km)

Gordes, hilltop village and Provençal postcard, Lacoste and its castle which housed the Marquis de Sade, Bonnieux with timeless charm, Lourmarin the last home of Albert Camus, and the enchanting landscapes of the Luberon to discover during a hike. Magnificent ! Read The Luberon, Provence in color

Where to go within 100 km of Ajaccio?

Where to go within 100 km of Ajaccio?
Piana © pixomatose – Fotolia

Cargèse et Piana (50 to 68 km)

Nestled in an enchanting setting, Cargo is undoubtedly the most Greek of the Corsican villages, with a Byzantine church harboring beautiful icons. Just north, towards the sublime coves of Piana, these jagged red granite cliffs which overhang the sea, even more beautiful in the setting sun.

Sartene (71 km)

Austere and superb, Sartene is “the most Corsican of Corsican cities” in the words of Mérimée. The houses with gray and brown facades, the ramparts of granite dominating the valley give a lot of character to the places. Not far, Campomoro and Roccapina are among the most beautiful beaches in Corsica

Corte (78 km)

An incredible citadel perched on top of a rocky outcrop, it is one of the most beautiful towns in Corsica, offering superb panoramas of the heart of the Isle of Beauty. Corte is also an ideal starting point for hiking in the surroundings, in the Tavignano gorges, then on the side of the Restonica Valley.

Aiguilles de Bavella (95 km)

A great site for hikers. The atneedles Bavella seem to pierce the sky. Around, a vast forest, where pines, firs, chestnuts and cedars coexist, completes the mystery of the place. Wild and splendid!

Where to go within 100 km of Lyon?

Where to go within 100 km of Lyon?
Cluny © MangAllyPop @ ER – stock.adobe.com

The Beaujolais road, from Villefranche to Saint-Amour Bellevue (34 to 64 km)

A route through 10 vineyards (Chiroubles, Morgon, Juliénas, Saint-Amour…) with, on the menu, visits to wineries, beautiful villages, good restaurants. Make a detour by Nice game, the capital of Beaujolais. Notice to epicureans!

Saint-Etienne (63 km)

The famous Cité du Design, an architectural heritage dating back to 14e s, the Pilat Regional Natural Park, the Le Corbusier architectural complex in Firminy … Enough to complete your weekend on the side of Saint Etienne !

Hauterives and the Postman Cheval’s Palace (73 km)

One of those curiosities of which France has the secret, the Postman Cheval’s Ideal Palace will surprise you for sure! A masterpiece of naive architecture to discover absolutely. Nearby, the ancient theater of Vienna, the vineyard of Condrieu and the City of chocolate Valrhona in Tain-l’Hermitage is worth a detour.

Cluny and the Clunisois (88 km)

Between Mâconnais and Charolais, the Clunisois will delight lovers of greenery, authenticity and history. Rolling landscapes covered with vineyards and forests, charming villages that have not moved for centuries, pleasant cycle paths, very appreciable gastronomy … And, of course, the abbey of Cluny which alone is worth the trip. Read Cluny and Clunisois, Burgundy on the South side

Where to go within 100 km of Dijon?

Where to go within 100 km of Dijon?
Semur-en-Auxois © traveller70 – stock.adobe.com

Beaune (44 km)

Capital of Burgundy wine, Beaune invites you to dive into a certain art of living between visits to cellars and museums, churches and tea rooms. The Hospices, founded at the end of the Middle Ages, are one of the jewels of French heritage. From there, the Burgundy Grands Crus route crosses the vineyards of Gevrey-Chambertin, Nuits-Saint-Georges, Pommard…

Alésia and Auxois (58 to 79 km)

The MuséoParc d ‘Alesia in Alise-Sainte-Reine (Côte d’Or) reveals the context and the background of the famous battle on the very place where it took place. To visit with family, before exploring the region of Flavigny at Semur-en-Auxois, passing by the superb Fontenay Abbey. A beautiful corner of Burgundy, for sure. Read In Burgundy, around Alésia.

National Forest Park (72 to 92 km)

Inaugurated in fall 2019, the latest addition to France’s national parks spans the Côte d’Or and Haute-Marne. Beautiful hikes to observe the flora and fauna are waiting for you, as well as the discovery of the regional heritage, around Langres, Châtillon-sur-Seine and Vix.

Besançon (95 km)

The neighbors of the Besançon are not far away, so why not go and visit them? The opportunity to (re) discover this flirtatious city nestled in a loop of the Doubs under the gaze of the Citadel of Vauban … A student and lively city where we stroll with pleasure! Read Besançon, 5 reasons to go

Where to go within 100 km of Strasbourg?

Where to go within 100 km of Strasbourg?
Pierre-Percée lake © aylerein – stock.adobe.com

Haguenau and Northern Alsace (34 to 65 km)

Pretty villages, castles, museums, forests and hikes in the Vosges du Nord Regional Nature Park : Northern Alsace has a lot to offer for a weekend. Around Haguenau, Wissembourg and Niederbronn-les-Bains, an authentically Alsatian region where it is good to relax. Read Northern Alsace with the Backpacker.

Bruche Valley (48 km)

Between Vosges and the plain of Alsace, a bucolic haven of peace with woods, ponds, meadows and villages where you can rest with pleasure between two hikes. Some 450km of marked trails crisscross the territory, including the GR5, GR 532 and GR 53 …

Colmar and the villages of the Wine Route (74 km)

The historic center of Colmar is a jewel, with its districts made up of half-timbered houses, in particular along the Lauch (Little Venice). And, to complete your stay, it is impossible to miss the nearby villages and vineyards of the Alsace Wine Route (Eguisheim, Kayzersberg…)! Read Colmar, the beauty of Alsace

Baccarat and the Pierre-Percée lake (78 to 95 km) :

Baccarat, cradle of the famous manufacture, has an interesting Crystal museum to visit before admiring the multicolored stained glass windows of the Saint-Rémy church. In the vicinity, the lake of Pierre-Percée, surrounded by the forests of the Vosges foothills, provides such a change of scenery that we call the region “Lorraine Canada”. A paradise for water sports. Read Nancy and South Lorraine with the Routard.

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Crowded parks and more traffic, the first weekend of phase 2 – Chronicle

Checks from North to South to verify compliance with anti-Covid measures on the first weekend of Phase 2 of the coronavirus emergency. Under the lens in particular the areas of the promenade and the parks, the destination of many runners and families who took advantage of the beautiful day to take a walk or a ‘ride’ in the open air. Even the nightlife areas are monitored, especially in Milan the Navigli, after the gatherings of recent days.

Law enforcement checks also on the exit roads from the cities to avoid any ‘escapes’ to the sea or to second homes.

Pescara Riviera as Navigli – Runners and people on bikes who do not respect distances, children playing together, boys talking in groups or embracing each other without the protection tools, many without a mask: from the beginning of ‘phase 2’ the Pescara seafront and the streets of the promenade are invaded daily by thousands of people, to the point that, after the controversy of Milan, the Riviera of the Adriatic capital is compared to the Navigli. Warning from the mayor Carlo Masci who talks about “risky attitudes” and invites citizens to “common sense”, asking them not to force him to “make rigid containment measures again”, which he is also ready to adopt if it should become necessary.

Crowded the pine forest of Ostia, 2 fined on the beach – Large influx in the main parks of the capital and in the pine forest of Castel Fusano today, the first Saturday of Phase 2. Checks are underway on the local police and law enforcement agencies in parks and historic villas to avoid gatherings. Checkpoints have also been set up in the city where cars in transit are stopped for checks on compliance with restrictions on the coronavirus. So far, six thousand checks have been carried out by the local police in Rome and fifteen sanctions have been carried out for failure to comply with anti – Covid. Between these two people fined for walking on the beach in Ostia on the shore. The other sanctions, according to what has been learned, mainly concerned movements without valid reason towards the sea.

In the first weekend of phase 2 in Turin and province special controls have been arranged to avoid gatherings. In addition to the fixed presence of the police in the Barriera di Milano and Aurora districts, decided by the Provincial Committee for public order and safety chaired by the prefect of Turin Claudio Palomba after the tensions of the past weeks, related checks are also scheduled on the day the restart of take-away and take-away services in bars and restaurants. Particular attention will also be paid in the evening hours, to prevent any queues in some areas of the city where restaurants and pizzerias are concentrated from turning into unauthorized gatherings, one of the reasons that led the Region to delay the OK for a few days. Turin take-away compared to the rest of Piedmont.

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Government works by decree, new meeting in the evening – Politics

Bonus for summer camps, emergency income that can be integrated with the new citizenship income with wider links. Renewal of all shock absorbers including the autonomous bonus, which will rise to 1000 euros in May but only for the categories most affected by the crisis. The package for job protection and income support that the government will propose with the new decree of May with economic anti-Coronavirus interventions is taking shape. Among these also the incentive to buy bikes and scooters to decongest public transport, with the shops ready to reopen shortly as soon as there will be the ordinance of the Mise.

Until Wednesday, when the text should arrive on the table of the Council of Ministers, there will be time to file the measures but the system of aid to families and workers largely responds to the announcements made so far. Redundancy fund and exemption fund will be renewed for another 9 weeks: in all they become 18 weeks of shock absorbers which can be requested in a window of another six months, until the end of October. The times to see the credits on the current account should be faster, because the request will have to be made by the end of the month in which the instrument is activated and the INPS will then have tight times to disburse it. With a click it should then arrive “in 24 hours” as promised by the Minister of Economy Roberto Gualtieri, the bonus for VAT and autonomous matches for the month of April.

The novelty is, however, that the bonus will be paid automatically but for this reason it will remain of € 600, while for the month of May it will go up to € 1000 but only for VAT and self-employed people who have lost a third of their income between March and April o the turnover compared to the same two-month period of 2019, for the cococo expiring within the year or who have already closed their contracts and for the seasonal spa and tourism seasons.

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