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The Bolivian electoral body defends the vote count

The calculation will be “safe, reliable and verifiable,” stressed the president of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal of Bolivia, Salvador Romero.

By:
EFE

The Bolivian electoral body defended this Sunday, October 18, the reliability of the vote counting system for the general elections of this day, after discarding the provisional count initially planned.

The computation will be “safe, reliable and verifiable,” stressed the president of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal of Bolivia, Salvador Romero, in the formal ceremony in La Paz prior to the start of the vote.

The suppression of the Preliminary Results Dissemination system (Direpre), which was announced last night a few hours before election day, aims to give priority to the “certainty” of the result over the “impatience” of knowing the count as soon as possible, he warned in his speech.

Romero explained that the polls will be opened in public and the voting records can be photographed, so he reiterated that it will be a “clean” count.

He stressed that these are the most complex elections in the democratic history of Bolivia, after canceling those of a year ago and having to delay them twice due to the covid-19 pandemic.

The event was attended by international observation missions from the United Nations, the Organization of American States and the European Union, among others, who have expressed their understanding for the suppression of the preliminary count, as well as the electoral candidacy of the Citizen Community.

Other candidacies such as the Movement for Socialism and Creemos expressed their rejection of this decision.

In the elections of October last year, the Preliminary Results Transmission System (TREP), different from the DIREPRE, was questioned when it remained almost a day without issuing data and suddenly resumed with a result in favor of then-President Evo Morales.

The 2019 elections were later annulled amid allegations of fraud in favor of Morales, who had been declared the winner for a fourth consecutive term.

Morales has always rejected these complaints, which are still being investigated by the Bolivian Prosecutor’s Office, and maintains that he was forced to leave power by a coup d’état amid pressure from the military and police, among others, to deny him a new electoral victory.

His party, the Movement for Socialism, which comes first in the polls at these new elections, has been questioning the “transparency” of the count for days and has announced that it will have its own.

This Sunday Bolivians will go to the polls to elect the new President, vice president, senators and deputies for the next five years from among five political forces.

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