Home Entertainment At war against boredom: a flight attendant, a suspended Tati and crimes in Orly

At war against boredom: a flight attendant, a suspended Tati and crimes in Orly

by drbyos

Airport-world Crazy about flight scenes, physical or magical (Catch me if you can, E.T.), Steven Spielberg was to end well in a film entirely located in an airport. He subverts the airport human condition there, which is that of waiting. Tourist disembarked from Eastern Europe at JFK airport in New York, Viktor Navorski (Tom Hanks, in his best vein of quidam “jamesstewartien”) finds himself stuck, condemned to mold in the transit zone after an administrative imbroglio . Spielberg’s contagious optimism sublimates this panoptic cold into a twirling playground where the American dream can be realized. Everything is there: cosmopolitanism, the possibility of starting from scratch and romantic comedy via the character of Amelia, a stewardess (Catherine Zeta-Jones), who is not fooled by her fantasy condition. “Keep your distance”, she warns, suddenly prophetic.
The terminal (2004) of Steven Spielberg Available on Netflix

Copyright United International Pictures (UIP)United International Pictures (UIP)

Airport-poem Closer to Chantal Akerman, the German Angela Schanelec lets Orly Airport shape its creation, using natural light and the passengers who block the frame. At the edge of the documentary, Schanelec places his camera at a good distance, picks up various characters who bind for a time. The working title of the film was Orly, Poem 1-4 and it’s a beautiful choral collage of fragments that unfolds – conversations, stolen moments, a melancholy of the treadmill that befits a filmmaker haunted by the passage of time in his films. In its own way, it invests the airport with a form of neutral beauty. False static, the film is also in a struggle when it comes to opposing the opacity of its protagonists to the transparency of the place (windows, cameras).
Orly (2010) by Angela Schalanec Available on Universciné.

Copyright Baba Yaga FilmsBaba Yaga Films

Against the moving sidewalk Seen from afar, the moving sidewalk transforms the traveler into an anonymous package on an assembly line spinning very smooth and straight towards an uncertain fate. This is the state of mind of Dustin Hoffman at Los Angeles Airport in the winner, sparrow fallen from the nest looking at the world around him and the song The Sound of Silence Simon and Garfunkel’s soundtrack turns this little moment of waiting into a bittersweet odyssey. Change your music, for example Across the 110th Street from Bobby Womack, and you suddenly become a haughty queen on the sidewalk like Pam Grier in the opening of Jackie Brown. You slide on it, then walk in the corridors like on the catwalk, then run as if your life depended on it.
The winner (1967) of Mike Nichols Available on FilmoTV. Jackie brown (1997) of Quentin Tarantino Available on Netflix.

Bac Films

Airport paradise Purgatory before flight to better skies, the airport is a possible gateway to paradise, preferably ambiguous. Choirs welcome us at the beginning of the Pier – that of Orly, definitely well off in the cinema. In this sublime short, Orly becomes a paradise lost in the space of a few photos and then an irresistible crime scene. Same celestial uncertainty at the beginning of Playtime, where nuns cross an immense space, cold and bright. Whispers, scattered characters engage in a choreography of mysterious trajectories. Marker and Tati cause precious moments of ethereal suspension, those that we would like to feel when we are in line for a low-cost flight to Malaga at dawn.
Playtime (1967) of Jacques Tati Available on Cinetek. The Pier (1962) of Chris Marker Available on Mubi.

Studiocanal

The apocalypse airport Let’s face it: airport anxiety stems from the screech of terrorist acts that could erupt there. To exorcise this, nothing like 58 Minutes to live, where Washington Airport is stormed with Bruce Willis as its only bulwark. Renny Harlin lacks the topographic precision of John McTiernan, author of the best parts of the franchise Die Hard, but his operative sense of excess unzips the place properly. No mythology of travel and private lounges, but a passage in good standing of the back shop, passageways, luggage rugs and ventilation ducts. “It was the 90s, remember? Electronic chips, microwaves, fax and telephone on planes ”, says Holly, McClane’s wife. We prefer the husband’s confined response: “The pinnacle of progress for me is frozen pizza.”
58 Minutes to live (1989) of Renny Harlin Available on Canal VoD.

Fox. Hatchet


Leo Soesanto

The terminal (2004) of Steven Spielberg Available on Netflix

Orly (2010) by Angela Schalanec Available on Universciné.

The winner (1967) of Mike Nichols Available on FilmoTV. Jackie brown (1997) of Quentin Tarantino Available on Netflix.

Playtime (1967) of Jacques Tati Available on Cinetek. The Pier (1962) of Chris Marker Available on Mubi.

58 Minutes to live (1989) of Renny Harlin Available on Canal VoD.

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