In Turkey, denied reports of the intention to abandon the buffet :: Society :: RBC

Turkey does not intend to refuse to use the all inclusive system in local hotels, as well as the buffet. This was reported by “RIA Novosti” the head of the Federation of Hoteliers of Turkey Sururi Chorabatyr.

On the eve of the newspaper Ahaber, citing the Minister of Culture and Tourism of the country Mehmet Ersoy, reported that Turkish hotels may abandon the buffet to provide additional epidemiological safety of its guests.

“There is no talk of canceling all inclusive and buffet. How can they be canceled if last year we concluded contracts with travel agencies for the sale of these services in the current season? ”Said Chorabatyr.

According to him, the media misinterpreted the words of the Turkish minister, who meant that it was about strengthening sanitary measures, as well as increasing social distance and changing some of the usual ways of providing services.

According to Chorabatyr, the system will continue to work with enhanced safety measures for guests and hotel staff, but this does not mean its cancellation, the head of the hoteliers federation added. He also explained that we are not talking about restrictions, but about changes in some forms of servicing hotel guests in connection with the strengthening of sanitary security measures.

As previously said Mehmet Ersoy, the tourist season in Turkey can open at the end of May. He also predicted that a fracture in the coronavirus pandemic could occur by the end of April.

Coronavirus

Russia Moscow Peace

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Recovered

0

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Died

0 (per day)

Recovered

0

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0

0 (per day)

Died

0 (per day)

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0

0 (per day)

Infected

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Source: JHU,
federal and regional
anti-virus operations

Source: JHU, federal and regional anti-virus operations

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The Château d’Apigné is preparing its plan to resume activity

The renovation of the runway at Rennes Airport is nearing completion. The Château d’Apigné, which has been preparing workers’ meal trays for two weeks, will continue this activity for companies in Rennes. “This is a start, we will see how this activity will continue”, comments Karim Khan, manager of this luxury hotel and restaurant in Ille-et-Vilaine.

→ LIVE. Coronavirus: the latest information in France and worldwide

The three cooks, alone on deck with forty employees, will be joined this week by the reception manager. “She was the one who asked to come back to prepare the business recovery plan, emphasizes his employer. It will implement the deconfinement health protocol, currently being developed within the Union of Hotel Trades and Industries (UIMH) and other professional unions, in collaboration with the ministries of health and labor. “

How to replace the card

The usual rules for distance, markings on the ground, washing employees’ hands and disinfecting all objects are part of the rules of good conduct intended to reassure customers and employees. “The menu of dishes can be a very dangerous object, observes Karim Khan. We are thinking about a giant slate, a menu that can be viewed on a smartphone, or even a reservation of dishes on the Internet. The latter solution reduces health risks, avoids waste and limits personnel costs. ” An interesting avenue for this European Ecolabel certified company, always looking for innovation to fight against global warming.

→ READ. Coronavirus: at Château d’Apigné, employees “make society”

As with 220,000 French establishments, which employ one million people, the reopening of Château d’Apigné remains unknown. “We are waiting to know if and when we can reopen, partially or completely. And we even wonder if we don’t lose less money by staying closed, “ adds the leader, also president of UMIH Brittany. The only reservations? Weddings in 2021.

Cancellation of charges

Within two weeks, the Château d’Apigné should however benefit from a loan guaranteed by the State (PGE) of 300,000 €, to cover part of the shortfall of 800,000 €, on a figure of annual business of 2.5 million euros. Good news ? Not quite : “This will create additional debt, which will have to be repaid and which will prevent us from investing, remarks Karim Khan. What we really need is a cancellation of our employer contributions until December, not just a postponement. “

The initiatives of hotel employees keep hope alive. A cook will start building a bread oven, which is also used for stewing meats. Another is about to set up a vegetable garden in the park of the Castle. With old tomato seeds.

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Turkish hotels will remove buffets after the coronavirus pandemic :: Society :: RBC

Photo: Sergey Bobylev / TASS

Hotels in Turkey after the start of the tourist season will abandon the buffet to ensure additional epidemiological safety of their guests. About this newspaper Ahaber writes with reference to the Minister of Culture and Tourism of the country Mehmet Ersoy.

According to him, if the situation with coronavirus does not worsen, the tourist season will begin in Turkey in late May. While it will be limited to domestic tourism.

Turkish Minister announced the opening dates of the tourist season

Photo: Altan Gocher / Global Look Press

However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, hotels will make changes to their safety and sanitary standards. In particular, the buffets will be removed from the all-inclusive system, replacing it with a comprehensive menu. Also, for hotels, they will set a maximum load of 50% of the maximum capacity, Ersoy added.

The ministry also noted that restaurants in Turkey may begin to open in the last week of May. New rules will be introduced for them – the distance between the tables should be at least two meters, and the number of visitors should not exceed 30% of the maximum capacity.

The distribution of coronavirus Covid-19 in the world

Number of confirmed cases of infection

Source: JHU

World Data i

Earlier in April, Ersoy said that the country’s authorities were waiting for a turning point in the spread of coronavirus infection in late April and were preparing for the opening of the tourist season in late May. The Minister said that the first foreign tourists in Turkey are waiting for guests from Asia.

In March, Turkish authorities recommended that tour operators postpone the start of the season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Johns Hopkins University, as of April 27, the country recorded more than 110 thousand patients, 29 thousand recovered and 2805 deaths from coronavirus.

Coronavirus

Russia Moscow Peace

0 (per day)

Recovered

0

0 (per day)

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0

0 (per day)

Died

0 (per day)

Recovered

0

0 (per day)

Infected

0

0 (per day)

Died

0 (per day)

Recovered

0

0 (per day)

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0

0 (per day)

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Source: JHU,
federal and regional
anti-virus operations

Source: JHU, federal and regional anti-virus operations

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New consultation on the support plan for the hotel and restaurant sectors

Will cafes, bars and restaurants reopen on June 15? If the government still refuses to provide an answer to this question, it nevertheless wishes to assure this sector in crisis of its support.

With this in mind, Emmanuel Macron held a videoconference on Friday morning with representatives of the hotel, catering and tourism sectors, in the presence of Bruno Le Maire (Economy), Gérald Darmanin (Budget) and Jean-Baptiste Lemoyne ( Trade). The meeting was devoted to the aid plan intended to support this sector hard hit by the coronavirus crisis.

“A strategy at local and national level” necessary

A recovery plan from which professionals expect a lot, in particular the exemption from the payment of local taxes in 2020, the cancellation of rents for six months and the at least partial coverage of operating losses.

Thursday, the president of the Hauts-de-France region Xavier Bertrand (ex-LR), and the mayor of Lille Martine Aubry also called on the government to mobilize asking, in particular, “The creation by the State of an investment fund”. Among them, “The incentive by the State to insurers so that they cover at least partially the loss of turnover that restaurants, cafeterias and hoteliers record”, they write with the president of the Lille European Metropolis, Damien Castelain, in a letter sent to Prime Minister Edouard Philippe and of which AFP obtained a copy.

Because if cafes and restaurants “Are ready to put in place the necessary health rules, both to protect their customers and their employees”, “A real strategy at the local level, as at the national level” is necessary “To allow the reopening in the best conditions of the hotel, cafe and restaurant sector”. Indeed, “In view of the imperatives of social distancing, a limitation in the number of tables in the dining room or on the terrace could lead a professional to work at a loss”, explain the three elected officials.

The reopening date still pending

Another strong expectation of bars, cafes and restaurants: knowing when they can reopen their establishments, of which they had to lower the curtain since March 14. A question mark on which the government does not want to lift the veil for now. Asked Wednesday about it, spokeswoman Sibeth Ndiaye did not confirm the hypothesis of a reopening on June 15. “We need time to develop the different scenarios for resumption of activity, so I obviously can not confirm this date of June 15“, She explained.

For their part, Xavier Bertrand, Martine Aubry and Damien Castelain also call to “give the profession visibility as quickly as possible, both on the health measures to be taken, but also on the possible date of recovery”.

Thursday morning, in a tribune at Le Figaro, Xavier Bertrand had already called to “save” the café-bars-restaurants which “Shape the identity of France” and find themselves stopped due to confinement. “We must save this essential link of our economic activity which is, with our museums, our cathedrals and our festivals, the pillar of our tourism, one of the emblems of our culture and a good part of the French art of living”, he said.

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Worry and hope in the Hotel Alpenpark

Es has become quiet in the Altjoch. Hikers, walkers, bikers, climbers or paragliders are missing in the small district of Kochel at the foot of Jochberg and Herzogstand; where the Alps begin. There is no kayak or stand-up paddler on the Kochelsee; no trace of vacationers anyway. Wherever the rush from near and far to the recreation area in the Bavarian Oberland can no longer be controlled, there is now a purest idyll.

That is deceptive, at least for Monika Angermann. Your Hotel Alpenpark, within walking distance of the Kochelsee, is orphaned. “From Maundy Thursday to this Sunday, we would have been fully booked,” she says. The season started on April 4th and would run almost continuously until the end of October. After Easter there would have been a smooth transition to guests who vacation on May 1st, Ascension Day, Pentecost, Corpus Christi; this is followed by the holiday season with the first guests from the northern German states almost without transition. In July and August, Angermann rented out almost all rooms and apartments.

Bookings for June, July and August are still pending

The 55-year-old businesswoman who opened the Alpenpark in 1999 fluctuates between confidence, serenity, worry – and excruciating uncertainty. It describes a mood that scares many hotel operators. The Alpenpark is a classic family business: daughter Yvonne, 34 years old, and Christian Hinz, 46 years old, partner of Monika Angermann, help in the “part-time job”. With the curfews, the trained hotel manager has broken off the important start to Easter. Improvement is hardly to be expected in May, as hotels are not exactly the top priority for easing.

But Angermann hopes. The long received bookings for June, July and August are available; all reservations for at least a week. None of the guests, mostly regular customers from all over Germany, canceled. “They all want to come,” she says. “A couple would also do without the breakfast buffet, as long as they could come,” they wrote. She has just received a booking request for July. There is great optimism that Germany will be open again by then. “If the restrictions are lifted, we will be flooded,” laughs Christian Hinz, for whom the urge to go home after weeks of work will be great.

70,000 companies at risk

Monika Angermann is racking her brains as to how to proceed after the opening. What about the necessary distance to the guests? Do they all have to wear face masks? Can you drive the breakfast buffet for early and late risers in two shifts? Should small houses be opened faster than big ones, so differences in how they are made in retail? Small hotels should certainly not be viewed critically because of the manageable number of guests. “They’re not breeding grounds, why should they stay closed?” She asks. “We finally need clarity,” she warns. You can feel their restlessness. The predictable is missing.

It is the small houses that fear for their existence. The German Hotel and Restaurant Association (Dehoga) raised the alarm last weekend. By the end of April, according to Dehoga, the hotel and restaurant industry had already lost 10 billion euros in sales. Without additional aid from the state, up to 70,000 companies, so every third in the industry, are at risk.

Craftsmen are allowed to stay

The Alpenpark tries to limit the damage. Temporary accommodation and monthly rental are offered by Angermann in the non-season between November and April to bridge the mild winter season. This continues for now. Business people have rented a few rooms. An employee of the pharmaceutical company Roche, which operates a large biotech center in nearby Penzberg, has just called and asked for an apartment. Fitters or craftsmen are among the guests.

They can accommodate them, but not those who want to do their home office in seclusion, not even a professor who wanted to nest in order to write a book. “No compelling reason to live here,” says Angermann. In other states, hotels can offer rooms as home offices. There is also a couple who, with two children, temporarily wanted to flee from Munich to safe seclusion.

The bridging helps little. “We live from the holiday guests,” says Angermann. Your hotel is not one of the most critical cases that the Dehoga describes. But the family business in the Altjoch cannot stay afloat for long. They have a cushion, savings and reserves. But in an emergency they were at best enough for an unusual season. “After all, we have to make investments for which we need the reserves,” says Christian Hinz. “Then there is no money.” Even if it starts, the problems remain for the time being. “We can only rent the rooms once; unlike a factory that can run three shifts, ”she says.

Even if Monika Angermann is not in acute need, she has applied for immediate Corona help of over 9,000 euros for small businesses with fewer than five employees. She would probably also have to take out a loan as an additional cushion. “How am I supposed to know today how long it will take?”

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How to live after the end?

WWhen I look through my window at my small desk, I look directly at the huge glass facade of a hotel not far from the old town of Ljubljana. The street is not wide and the hotel completely blocks the view. It is a huge glass wall, gold-rimmed square theater box. I usually see here how lights come on and go out, little stage curtains move aside and the lives of strangers give wanted or involuntary guest performances.

When I and my wife inspected the apartment ten years ago, it was the same window where the owner stood and looked melancholy at the street. She was born in the same room seventy years ago. Back then she looked thoughtfully and said: “After they had built the giant thing, everything around had been pretty degenerate for a long time, no sidewalk, the street was unpaved. But then he came and everything was spiced up and made beautiful overnight. ”

I thought about the time it must have been in the late 1960s and early 1970s and replied without guessing, “HE came, you mean President Tito?” “No,” said the former owner, “I mean Gagarin, the first human in space.” I have never checked until today whether the story is right and Gagarin really stayed in the hotel opposite and his visit was responsible for the new pavement all around, but the idea that was in old communist ones Times a short visit by a single person could change entire residential areas, is both fascinating and repulsive.


For the first few years after we moved into the apartment, the hotel, as run down as it was, was often pretty empty. Slovenia was in a long recession after 2008 and this was also evident from the rare hotel visitors. But then came – no, again this time it was not Tito, nor Gagarin or one of the contemporary dictators, sheikhs or presidents elected for life. It was not an individual at all, but the masses of the Asian tourists, who were nameless for us, who were smuggled here by tourism agencies for one night, to the increasingly popular insider tip on their trip from Venice to Dubrovnik. The small, once sleepy parking lot in front of the hotel entrance was suddenly full of tour buses. From now on we had to keep the window closed and covered, because of the noise, the exhaust gases, the look and photo-loving faces, which like us, in turn, a few souvenirs in the form of insights into the real, true and very private spectacle in Ljubljana wanted to capture the species of natives found in the apartment window theater opposite.

Then it became much, much calmer

It was a time again when everything had to be made more beautiful and more pleasing to the onlooking industry. The road between us and the hotel was torn open, digging for Roman tombs, even finding a few stones and fibulae, laying new, larger sewerage pipes, and pouring everything back in as quickly as possible. At the same time, the interior of the hotel was being renovated; a café with a terrace was being built just opposite, so that the Chinese, Irish and Italian chants of the drunk could be listened to even with the windows closed at night. The store boomed for a few years. Then it suddenly became much, much calmer. I went to the hotel café to drink espresso. The lonely receptionist with whom I chatted said: We may still be able to cope with the Chinese staying away, but if we also stay away from the Italian guests, we are done for. The hotel has been officially dead for six weeks now. I can’t help looking at the carcass every day. It doesn’t take long to realize that only when the hotel died did its glass facade turn into a living thing. Instead of continuing to be a bored voyeur of the unknown visitors, pulling the curtains aside, looking through the window daydreaming, putting on make-up, arguing, taking off and getting dressed or just watching TV, I now look into the increasingly clear reflection of my own window that reflects the dead silent glass facade of the hotel.

Perhaps I had to wait ten years for this moment when nothing, no distractions and no excuses no longer protect me from looking at myself, at us, the natives, who are trapped in our apartments, waiting for life to continue after the reflection has ended . It is not easy to withstand your own view of yourself and your own misery, it is much more difficult than we initially thought it would be glossy. It’s not easy not to look away, not to run into the computer screen or into a glass of whiskey or wine.

The Slovenian poet Ales Steger


I look and see how I look and what I look at, and at the same time feel awe, terror and gratitude. That in the middle of a pandemic there is something like a feeling of gratitude for everything, for everything that happens and may happen to you – it may sound strange considering the many sacrifices and deprivations. At the same time, however, it is precisely this contradictory feeling of gratitude (the neighboring feeling of total horror?) In these conditions that is the only basis in which I can look into our civilization and sit in the middle of deserted streets and beautifully polished ruins of tomorrow, sitting behind my small desk can ponder something like a very vague idea of ​​the day ahead.

Aleš Šteger, born in 1973, recently published the book of poems “Über den Himmel unter den Erde” (2019) in German.

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Travel on the screen: luxurious, cheap, climate-neutral

Nhe travel was previously so easy, so safe, so cheap and so climate neutral. Yes, yes, it is clear: For holidaymakers and those willing to travel, for airlines and hoteliers, and indeed for the tourism industry in general, the worldwide standstill caused by the corona virus may be a terrible nightmare – but it hardly affects my freedom of movement and travel. I just travel as always: fast and virtual, lively with all the harassment through world history.

Even if the many who are now stuck in their home office see their stay in their own four walls as a forced internment in Quarantano and not as an opportunity – as an accomplished home tourist, I do what I have always enjoyed doing: Holiday in the home resort. Shortly after eleven, right after getting up, I start up the computer and off we go. I’m on the road restlessly, I’m an organizer, tour guide and guest in personal union. I travel sensationally climate-neutral, I know neither overbooking nor crashes, I am not in line and I am already back home when the others have not yet taken off. Through the internet to the miracle of recreative bilocation: I am at home and on vacation at the same time.

For me, planning a trip is not just half the holiday fun, it’s the whole. And I often save a lot more than half the rent. Devotional, even emphatic, book so much that I then, if I drive there, only do an emotionless comparison with the non-digital reality. Through the physical transfer of my own body. You can’t travel more relaxed.

No traffic jams and no socket adapter

Once I have found a good flight connection, first class, of course, then I am already satisfied and no longer have to struggle through the humiliating booking process, book paid suitcases or think about the seat reservations 24 hours before check-in. Because as a virtual traveler, I laugh at the urges that spoil the holiday for normal tourists: I don’t have to pack or put together a first-aid kit, don’t have to put the backrest in an upright position, don’t have to change the clock, and I’m neither in a taxi nor in a rental car in an apocalyptic suburb. Congestion, does not have to queue in front of a museum and does not have to buy socket adapters.

If I feel like it, I fly to Rio and Shanghai, Bali and Hawaii in a flight simulator. Then first move into the hotel or the holiday apartment. Before that, I diligently clicked through at least forty other guest apartments and read the associated reviews, now I know the area very well. But the apartment also needs to be chosen wisely. Licked vacation apartments in globally uniform shabby chic, filled with colorful chairs, “midcentury design classics” bulky waste leftovers and teasingly scattered Ikea bargains are boring. These standard dungeons are mostly ticked off by small business owners who have eight apartments running at the same time, always in the gentrified trendy district or just next to it. They used to be hookers, now they do Airbnb, that just brings more.

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New York’s most expensive hotel as a hostel for medical professionals


The Four Seasons is New York’s most expensive hotel address.
Picture: © Peter Malinowski / InSite 2014

A Swabian-born man runs the most expensive hotel in New York – and has made it a free hostel for medical staff. Even after the crisis, it will not be the same as before, he says.

Unter $ 995 is usually nothing at the Four Seasons. That is the price per night for the cheapest room in the New York luxury hotel. The most expensive accommodation is the “Ty Warner Penthouse”, a 400 square meter suite on the 52nd floor, which is named after the owner of the hotel and offers a panoramic view of the metropolis. It has a private elevator, a waterfall and a piano. The $ 50,000 room rate includes the use of a chauffeured Rolls-Royce.

Roland Lindner

The hotel has been run for two years by Rudy Tauscher, a Swabian from Tettnang on Lake Constance. Tauscher sees the house as a “crown jewel”, a timeless classic that should look the same in fifty years as it does today. There is pride in his voice when he says the Four Seasons is the most expensive hotel in town. “We always set the price.” In the middle of the corona crisis, the Four Seasons has completely changed. Within a short time, the luxury hotel has become a free hostel for medical staff. Regular operations ceased on March 20, and a few days later owner Ty Warner made the decision to house doctors, nurses and nurses in the house and give them a temporary home between shifts.

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healing for 1,400 years

Madrid

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In November 2013, ABC informed its readers of François Hollande’s intention to “relentlessly dismantle the oldest and most legendary hospital in Paris.” Actually the Hôtel-Dieu It was the oldest hospital center in the world, having been taking care of its patients continuously since it began operating in the 7th century, five hundred meters from Notre Dame Cathedral. The president alleged that he had been in crisis for years, “but his emergency services provided services that it is not an exaggeration to describe as mythical,” assured our correspondent.

To give you an idea, when the Hôtel-Dieu was founded by Bishop Landerico on June 26, 651, it was still half a millennium before the famous cathedral began to be built. And when it suffered a fire in April last year, the historic hospital was still serving. Hollande was unable to dismantle it entirely due to pressure from unions and health personnel. In fact, it was two of his otolaryngologists who detected, a few weeks ago, that loss of smell was one of the symptoms that a patient with coronavirus could suffer.

Our eyes are on the operation of hospitals and the enormous sacrifice of their health personnel since the pandemic began in January. Every day we applaud at 20.00, but have we ever wondered what this work was like in the Middle Ages and what facilities did doctors have? “Today, the hospital is considered the most important institution when it comes to medical care for both the poor and the wealthy. And it is often assumed that this was always the case, but until recently, most people, especially if they were ill, would have struggled not to be admitted to a hospital, which was associated with poverty and death, “he noted. Lindsay Granshaw in her book “The Hospital in History” (Routledge, 1989).

Fourteen centuries

This was not the case with the Hôtel-Dieu, considered one of the best hospitals in the entire Middle Ages. We know them because even today there is a large amount of historical documentation, precisely because it began as a philanthropic institution that soon became a public charity health center. For more than fourteen centuries, it continued to be the foundation stone and foundation for the entire hospital system in the capital of France. Hence, the merit of dismantling it is at least doubtful, in reference to Hollande.

Many authors have described this and other medieval hospitals as a space established to carry out free public charity work, to alleviate suffering and reduce people’s poverty. In this, the Hôtel Dieu was both a model and an exception. In its origins, it had the help of a group of women who voluntarily cared for the sick, weak, orphaned, elderly and helpless. In the 12th century, these women were constituted as a religious order attached to the order of Saint Augustine and continued to provide care at the center until the French Revolution.

Until that 12th century, the considered first stage of the configuration of hospitals for the historian Mirko Grmek, doctors and nurses followed the «Regula Benedicti», dictated centuries ago by Saint Benedict of Nursia: «We must take pre-eminence of the sick, we must serve them as if they were Jesus Christ, since He already said:” I was sick and you took care of me. ” And also: “What you have done to one of these poor, you will have done to me.” Therefore, it must be a personal obligation that the patients are not neglected in any case, regardless of their state and condition ”».

Maternity

This rule evidenced that the importance of religion in attendance. It can be said that most of the hospitals were more ecclesiastical than medical institutions, where the sick were admitted and isolated to provide more relief than intent to cure them. Love and faith were more important than the scientific skills and abilities of priests and medical personnel. However, in the 13th century, the Hôtel-Dieu already had four main rooms for patients at various stages of their illness, which were divided by their greater or lesser severity. To this was added another room for those who were in the recovery phase and one more for maternity.

So special was the care that the recovered patients used to voluntarily stay for several more days to work on the farm or in the garden in gratitude to the staff. The vast majority of hospitals in the Middle Ages were not managed as efficiently as the Hôtel Dieu. From 1136 on, only the Pantokrátor hospital, founded by the Byzantine emperor Basil John II on the banks of the Bosporus: it had 50 beds distributed in five departments: 10 for surgical illnesses, eight for acute patients, 10 for male patients, many others for women and, finally, 12 for gynecological and deliveries. And each had two doctors, five surgeons, and two nurses or servants, all under the command of two chief doctors.

Both hospitals did, however, have an outpatient department, so that many nurses went to the homes of the wealthiest patients to treat them. And they also had a pharmacy, a bathroom of their own, a mill and a bakery. A luxury of facilities that were, obviously, not found in practically any health center in the world. That is why the best doctors in the country always went to the Hotel-Dieu. And throughout its 1,400 years of life, the best specialists in history have worked on it. See for example Jean-Nicolas Corvisart, Bonaparte’s personal physician and one of the most famous cardiologists on the planet at the time; Ambroise Paré, father of surgery, anatomy, teratology and military health; Pierre Joseph Desault, personal doctor of the son of Louis XVI; Guillaume Dupuytren, the first specialist to remove the lower jaw and successfully drain a brain abscess; Armand Trousseau, whose works on clinical and therapeutic medicine had a great impact in the 19th century, and the famous French biologist, anatomist and physiologist Xavier Bichat, who died precisely when he fell down the hospital stairs.

Heating

The Hôtel Dieu was, of course, suffering from some of the hardships of the dark Middle Ages, for example in regards to high demand. Occasionally each bed could be occupied by two patients, a common occurrence in most hospitals around the world, where plague and contagious diseases were generally more deadly to Crusaders than the Saracen swords. As represented in the illustrations of various artists of the time, some of the beds were separated by fabrics that were never washed and, therefore, facilitated the spread of infections and hindered ventilation.

In our Parisian hospital, the rooms were heated, at least, with huge hearths and charcoal stoves. And the clothes of the sick were kept in a closed room to wash and fix them before being returned. The organization of this center can be said to be similar to that of modern hospitals, with a chief in each department. And so it continued to this day. As the French surgeon Jacques-René Tenon said in 1788: «We have in Paris a unique hospital of its kind; This hospital is the Hôtel-Dieu, where you are attended at any time without exception of age, sex, country, religion; Fevers, diarrheas, contagious and non-contagious, to lunatics susceptible to treatment, to women, children and pregnant women; it is the hospital for men and the sick ».

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Ronaldinho in fake passport affair in Paraguay in luxury hotel

So some would be put up with a house arrest. Former Brazilian soccer star Ronaldinho spends his at the Hotel Palmaroga in Paraguay’s capital Asunción – where he and his brother Roberto Assis live in two premium suites for which they pay $ 350 a day (about € 320) according to media reports. In addition to a $ 1.6 million bail against which the two-time world footballer and world champion of 2002, as well as his brother and manager, were released ten days ago.

You are the only guests of the hotel. Visits are not allowed due to corona restrictions. While the inmates were fighting for him as a teammate in the football tournament in prison, Ronaldinho is now going to the hotel gym. Hotel manager Emilio Yegros said that Ronaldinho had been given a ball and could do his tricks in a room about 30 by 15 meters. His expression had changed since day one, when he looked tense and stressed.

Ronaldinho awaits further proceedings in a case in which he faces five years in prison if convicted. The question will be whether his lawyers will succeed in maintaining the version that the only offense is using a fake passport – or whether he and his brother are involved in the activities of a criminal organization.

Ronaldinho spent 32 days – including his 40th birthday – in prison for entering Paraguay with false documents that he and his brother claimed to have been given by business partners. In the neighboring country, they wanted to participate in the opening of a casino and several charity events, as well as to advertise Ronaldinho’s biography. This was followed by extensive investigations with numerous arrests.

Ronaldinho and his brother and manager are among 16 suspects involved in corruption investigations in Brazil. On March 6, they were arrested with fake passports when they entered Paraguay. The former star of FC Barcelona and his brother had their passports withdrawn in Brazil in November 2018 because they had not paid the equivalent of 2.2 million euros. The penalty was imposed for causing massive environmental damage to a property in Porto Alegre.

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