Hendri Alfred Bakari died after being arrested by the police, his body was covered with bruises and his head was wrapped in duct tape

The atmosphere in the review room of the RSBK Batam corpse, Saturday (8/8/2020) night, for a moment Hendri’s body will be moved to RSBP Batam. Here are 5 Facts about the Death of Hendri Alfred Bakari, Family Questions about Arrest Warrant and Bruised. (Source: Tribunbatam.id)

BATAM, KOMPAS TV – A resident named Hendri Alfred Bakari died shortly after being arrested by members Police from Barelang Police, Batam.

The death of this 38-year-old man is really unnatural. The reason is, Hendri’s head is wrapped in duct tape by Police.

The family suspected that there was violence perpetrated by individuals Police, until finally causing Hendri to die.

Also Read: “My brother was taken by the police to a room in which there were blocks, pipes, and electric shocks, then he was persecuted”

Christy Bakary, family party of the late Hendri, revealed the chronology of the event in a virtual press conference with Kontras and other civil society organizations.

Christy said, initially Hendri or who is usually called Otong was arrested by the police because he was suspected of being linked to a drug case on Thursday (6/8/2020) at 15.00 WIB.

“At that time, the one who saw his wife, but saw him less clearly because from afar. Many residents gathered there, there was a commotion, finally Kak Otong was arrested on the 6th, ”Christy was quoted as saying from Kompas.com on Wednesday (12/8/2020).

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Why does California have low COVID-19 numbers in the US drama? – Telemundo 52

LOS ANGELES – Early confinement and other prevention measures promoted by the state government have allowed California, with more than 40 million inhabitants and some 300 deaths from COVID-19, to become an example of how to deal with the coronavirus pandemic in United States.

So far, the nation’s largest metropolis, Los Angeles, with more than 10 million citizens, has recorded fewer than 6,000 cases and 132 deaths, far from New York City, which has 8 and a half million inhabitants. and it has confirmed some 130,000 infections and more than 4,000 deaths.

“California has been doing quite well in the COVID-19 pandemic, with a relatively low number of infected per 100,000 people and a low death rate,” said Professor Karin Michels, head of the Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES

California Governor Gavin Newsom was one of the first in the country to enact relatively strict confinement, allowing only “essential” activities such as going to the grocery store and pharmacy, and exercising respect for safety distances between people.

In contrast, eight states – Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, South Carolina, Utah, and Wyoming – have not mandated their residents to stay home.

“The governor issued ‘home security’ and ‘shelter’ orders relatively quickly. Universities like UCLA and other large employers closed even earlier and sent people to work, teach and study from home,” said Michels, who has extensive experience in disease prevention, public health and statistical methods.

Due to the COVID-19 crisis, California schools may continue to be closed until the end of August.

Newsom also took the initiative to decree the closure of schools, which will remain closed until next year, as a preventive measure; in asking President Donald Trump to send a hospital ship to Los Angeles to support local hospitals before it reached a hypothetical peak in the number of cases, which has not yet occurred; and in closing the state’s beaches and parks.

Another point that seems to have helped so far in the exceptional case of California against COVID-19, according to experts, is the low population density of the state, which reduces the possibility of contagion and allows better compliance with the rules of social distancing.

“TO
 Despite having a large population, Californians do not live in
as dense as New Yorkers. Cities spread with
Few skyscrapers: Relative to other states, many more people in
 California lives in houses, not in apartment buildings or buildings
high, “summarizes Michels, who is based on data from a study of his
college.

YOUNG PEOPLE, LESS DEATHS PER CAPITA

California has had a much lower per capita death rate than most of the nation’s largest states, with the exception of Texas.

“The state has a low average age and a high
density of healthcare facilities, which may have contributed to
 the low mortality rate, “explained Michels.

According to a recent study published in The Lancet, the mortality rate among those infected with 20 years of age is 0.03%, while for those 70 years of age it is 8.6%.

Cautious tone

The
 Californian authorities have projected alarming numbers in the
recent weeks, although so far those estimates have not been
compliment.

Newsom himself foresaw two weeks ago that more than half the state’s population, or about 25 million people, would become infected, so he begged its residents to follow the guidelines to the letter.

For his part, the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti, did not hesitate to forecast that the city “would follow in the footsteps of New York” in number of cases, a catastrophic scenario that is still far away.

COVID-19 affects children differently than adults. This is what the doctors say in the following video.

The United States on Monday exceeded 10,000 deaths from coronavirus, with 10,335 and almost 350,000 infected, making it the third country with the most deaths after Italy and Spain, according to the count of the Center for Systems, Science and Engineering (CSSE) from Johns Hopkins University (Maryland).

The new data is known after this Sunday
President Donald Trump, during his usual daily press conference,
make sure “this will probably be the hardest week, between this
week and next, and there will be a lot of death. ”

The state of New York, the great epicenter of the pandemic in the United States, accumulates with these latest figures a total of 4,758 deaths and 130,689 confirmed cases of COVID-19, compared to just over 122,000 that it had a day earlier.

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“The argument of the Americans is, of course, ridiculous.” – Kommersant

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Chaos, inconsistency Marks the launch of the Drive-thru Virus – NBC Los Angeles test

Drive-thru sites have been opened in the United States to make testing the new coronavirus faster and safer. But just like the rest of the United States’ response to the pandemic, the system has been characterized by inconsistencies, delays and shortcomings. Many people who have symptoms and a doctor’s order have waited hours or days for a test.

More than a week after President Donald Trump promised that states and retail stores such as Walmart and CVS would open drive-through test centers, few sites are active and are not yet open to the public. Some states are leaving the test sector open to the private sector; others are coordinating efforts through state health departments.

Patients complained that they had to jump through bulky red tape and wait for days to get tested, then wait even longer for a result. The test centers were opened in some places to be closed shortly afterwards due to the shortage of supplies and staff. And while the drive-through test centers that have been opened are generally sorted, in some there have been long lines.

The slow increase in COVID-19 tests and the unpredictable nature of the system make it difficult for public health officials to track the spread of the disease and bring it under control.

“We need to do more extensive testing to fully understand the scale of the public health situation we are facing,” said Joseph Wendelken, a spokesman for the Rhode Island Department of Health.

Dr Brett Giroir, the federal health officer in charge of overseeing the tests, said on Saturday at a White House briefing that approximately 195,000 people have so far been tested in the United States. This figure does not include some people who have been tested in private laboratories.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more serious illnesses, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the new virus. According to the World Health Organization, people with mild illness recover in about two weeks, while those with more severe illness can take anywhere from three weeks to six weeks to recover.

Drive-through test sites have sprung up in places in over 30 states: in state parks and parking lots, near medical centers and universities, the Mississippi state fairgrounds, and near where the Jacksonville Jaguars play. The governor of Maryland last week ordered the stopping of vehicle emission inspection programs across the state, so that the offices could be used as drive-thru centers to test the virus.

But as of Friday, there were no open drive-through tests available in Maryland inspection centers.

The Utah health department said it is not responsible for the sites and is not monitoring them. The North Carolina health director said the state is leaving the tests to the private sector and declined to say how many sites there are. In contrast, in Rhode Island, health organizations manage the sites in collaboration with the state health department.

On Thursday, cars lined up for more than a mile outside a hospital in Houston when the first drive-through test site was opened. U.S. representative Sheila Jackson Lee said she administered fewer than 200 tests in the first six hours.

Elsewhere, at various sites visited by Associated Press reporters, the scenes were well controlled and sometimes quite silent.

Dozens of people waiting by car in a downtown Homestead, Florida on Wednesday waited for their turn to speak with a screener who was wearing a suit and mask and carrying notes. Some were apparently removed. Others were stirred, checked their temperatures, and swabbed for the samples.

But the shortage of supply has stopped the thrusters in several states, including Colorado, New Mexico, Virginia, Florida, Louisiana, Alabama, North Carolina and Utah. A Las Vegas site was shut down because it didn’t have enough workers.

New York state opened several centers with great fanfare on Tuesday. By Friday, however, the New York City health department issued a warning saying that only people requesting hospitalization should be tested, due to a shortage of protective equipment such as face masks. Drive-thru sites in New York State remain open, but only to people who meet certain criteria.

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak said he had asked the federal government for additional test kits and supplies, but the state received a warning Thursday that all of its requests for drive-through test pods and test kits “are undefined arrears, without any estimate of a timeline for delivery. “

“This is our unfortunate Nevada reality. It depends on us, “he said.

The sites themselves are dotted with tents and traffic cones. The most important features are medical personnel who wear masks, gloves and protective vests or other clothing. They take nose and throat swabs from people sitting in their cars or help people get in for the test.

Some states have only one drive-thru site. Montana’s only site is in Billings, the largest city in the state. Others have a dozen.

Security guards have been reported on many sites, but an AP survey of states did not reveal any security concerns. In Rhode Island, the National Guard was on hand to set up the state’s three drive-thru sites and even to buffer patients.

The vast network of drive-thru sites in retail chains that Trump claimed was coming over a week ago has not materialized yet. CVS has opened a site in Massachusetts that defines a “test model”. Walmart launched two sites on Sunday and Walgreens said it will launch one, all three in Illinois. Only healthcare professionals and first responders are allowed, and Walmart said that a maximum of 150 tests per day could be performed on its federal sites.

The patchwork of approaches has caused confusion for patients. Caroline Mauldin was sentenced to get tested by her doctor in Charleston, South Carolina on Tuesday after suffering from pain and chills for several days.

To make an appointment at a center in a medical center, she had to fill out a long online questionnaire and spent two days calling a number that went to voicemail and did not answer messages. He resorted to tweets in the hospital several times just to get things going.

Finally, on Thursday, he had an appointment for Monday. And she was told that the results would not return until after 4-5 days. The visit will cost you $ 25, he said. Complicating things, he doesn’t have a car and has to borrow it from a friend.

“Here we have a lot of older, low-income people who don’t have Internet access and who don’t have access to transportation. And since they’re the highest risk population, how are we testing for them?” She asked.

In urban areas such as New York and Philadelphia, some sites offer “walk-up” dating for people without cars.

At the Penn Medicine test site in West Philadelphia, two security agents were late on Thursday to make sure that people arriving by car or on foot had an appointment. For about 40 minutes that evening, the line of cars never grew to more than six or seven. But Patricia Sullivan, Penn Medicine’s quality manager, said every morning last week, 25-35 cars were lined up and six or seven standing patients were 6 feet apart on a porch waiting to be seen.

The 20 sites in Greater Philadelphia are testing around 1,000 people a day, but that hasn’t eliminated pent-up demand.

Rosanne Tanner’s 79-year-old mother has been suffering from fever and chest pain since returning from a visit to Tanner’s brother and wife, who had recently been on a cruise ship.

His doctor ordered a test on Tuesday, but when he tried to make an appointment at a drive-through site in a hospital outside of Philadelphia, he was told that “they are overloaded, they are bogged down,” Tanner said.

Medical staff told her that they are scheduling 15 minutes apart, so there are no bottlenecks on the test site.

Finally on Thursday his mother made sure of an appointment for the following Tuesday. Then, he will have to wait another five days for a result.

“The delay in these tests is putting people at risk,” said Tanner.

In Rhode Island, state officials said they are testing 100 to 200 people per day at all test sites, including three drive thrusters.

Governor Gina Raimondo said they want to perform 500 to 600 a day, but they don’t have the supplies they need.

“It is our top priority to reach a place where everyone who needs it can be tested and you will get results very quickly,” said Raimondo during a press conference held on Facebook Live on Friday on Friday. “So if you’re positive, we can quarantine you.”

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Associate press writers Michelle L. Price in Las Vegas, Lynne Sladky in Homestead, Florida, Claudia Lauer in Philadelphia, Chris Ehrmann in Hartford, Connecticut, Brady McCombs in Salt Lake City and Jonathan Drew in Raleigh, North Carolina and Anne D ‘Innocenzio and Mike Sisak in New York contributed to this report.

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The Associated Press receives support for health and scientific coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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High schools, universities reveal reimbursement fees, credit policies – NBC 7 San Diego

With most university campuses closed and many students returning home, families are looking for details of possible reimbursements or school credits, as well as reimbursement policies related to campus accommodation and catering costs.

The University of San Diego offers proportionate reimbursements for room and board expenses, parking permit fees and its fee for the Student Life Pavilion, but the USD student government group will not reimburse the tuition fee for college students. The group instead decided to use that money “to provide support to students with financial needs who have been affected” by the closure of the campus.

USD administrators also offer a 60% refund for students who withdraw from university by March 20. The university published the details of its “financial arrangements” for families on its website.

Max Chan, a graduate of the Canyon Crest Academy now in his first year at the University of Southern California, was forced to return home after the coronavirus epidemic. Her father, former NBC7 reporter Chris Chan, said that USC does not offer refunds or credits for the fall semester lessons because Max and other students are attending the spring lessons online.

“It’s hard to argue, say,” Well, it’s only 60 or 70 percent worth, “and ask for that money back or ask for a discount,” said Chris Chan.

But the Chan family is relieved that USC, like the USD, will offer them a proportional discount for Max’s unused dormitory rent and meal plan.

In Cal State San Marcos, classes also continue online, starting March 20. The university does not offer tuition refunds. Students who live on campus have the option to cancel the housing contract without penalty if they decide to move from campus. CSUSM spokesman Eric Breier told NBC 7, however, that campus housing remains open “for residents who would like to stay.” The CSUSM website contains detailed information on its housing policy, as well as notifications on the cancellation of campus events and general information on the impact of the coronavirus on the San Marcos campus.

In contrast, UCSD administrators are “strongly urging” students to leave La Jolla campus “as soon as possible, but no later than March 29th”. School officials said students who cannot return home should have enough room for “effective social removal”. Students who leave the campus by the deadline of March 29 will receive a full refund of housing costs for the spring quarter, UCSD spokeswoman Leslie Sepuka said.

Sepuka said, however, that, “in line with the president’s UC office guide”, there will be no tax refunds or contributions because “the campus remains operational” with virtual and alternative learning methods.

San Diego state administrators have published detailed information on reimbursements, credits and lesson status on the university’s website. An SDSU spokesman urged students and their families to check his coronavirus information page frequently, “since we are updating it several times a day.”

Many local families also hope for refunds or credits for school trips to the east coast and around the world that have been canceled due to the pandemic.

Peter Schwarz said the travel company that canceled a $ 3,400 trip to the East Coast planned for his son’s middle school class offers a full refund, minus their $ 250 deposit. He said families also the possibility of withholding the refund, in the hope that the trip will be rescheduled.

After talking to other parents, Schwarz decided to decline the refund offered.

“Hopefully they will continue to offer that refund,” said Schwarz. “This was the only thing that was a little vague in their communication. Do we have to take the refund now and we won’t receive it later? It’s unclear.”

At least one family, however, is taking legal action in San Diego against the organizers of an exchange program for US students. In a lawsuit filed on March 11, the student is contesting the tour group’s alleged refusal to refund the full $ 3,800 cost of the program. The student’s attorneys also want a judge to declare the company’s contract inapplicable and “inconceivable”. That lawsuit could last for months, however, as California courts essentially closed local courts and filed civil cases during the pandemic.

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