Countries introduce restrictions on the coronavirus curb

Governments around the world are increasingly imposing mandatory restrictions on residents to force people to keep away from each other, intensifying efforts to slow the global spread of coronavirus while cases exceed 350,000.

New Zealand said it would impose a blockade and move to the highest alert level, closing schools on Tuesday. Colombia has ordered a three-week blockade nationwide and sealed its borders. India has initiated a blockade on a number of states and Australia has imposed the closure of restaurants and bars …

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The Federal Reserve will launch the commercial paper financing facility amid the uncertainty of the coronavirus

The Federal Reserve said Tuesday that it will establish a loan facility to support short-term commercial debt markets to prevent escalating financial tensions from accelerating the economic damage of coronavirus.

The Fed said it had established the new commercial paper financing instrument, a version last used during the 2008 financial crisis, after obtaining the approval of the Treasury secretary.

“The…

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NHL pushes back the chronology on the potential recovery of the season – NBC Los Angeles

Don’t count on hockey being played early.

NHL has significantly scaled back its timeline to when it can potentially resume playing for several weeks, if not a month or more, following the new coronavirus pandemic.

The league and the NHL Players’ Association told players on Monday that they can return home – even outside of North America – and must self-isolate until March 27 while the season is pending. But the NHL also warned that it will not be able to give indications of the potential reopening of team practices for another 45 days, which could push any potential return to play in May.

The new directives follow the CDC’s recommendation for gatherings of 50 or more people in the United States for the next eight weeks. NHL said that “depending on world developments”, consideration will be given to reopening facilities after the end of the self-quarantine period in late March, but practices for the 31 teams would not occur at the end of April – soon.

“I think in light of the CDC’s recommendations, it’s hard to predict that we’re looking at many events here in March or even April, in my opinion,” said NHL player agent Jay Grossman.

This is a big move from Friday, when the league gave players the opportunity to return to the team’s facilities and train and skate in small groups.

The latest decision leaves open questions about whether NHL can complete its regular season, which was suspended Thursday with 189 games left, and whether it might be necessary to change its playoff format to prevent the postseason from going into the summer months. .

Last week, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said he remained optimistic about the resumption of the game and the concession of the Stanley Cup, which has been delivered every year since 1893 except for 1919 due to the Spanish flu epidemic and the 2005 when a blockade canceled the whole season.

Although NHL followed the NHB’s lead in suspending its season, Bettman declined to set a time frame on how long the “break” would last. Last week NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said his league break will likely last at least a month.

“The pause will be until it is appropriate, prudent and safe to start the backup,” said Bettman. “Nobody knows how long the break can be. Nobody, not even the medical community, can predict it with certainty.”

Bettman, the executive director of NHL and NHLPA, Don Fehr, each stated that they were not aware of positive results for the coronavirus.

Arizona defender Coyotes Aaron Ness became the first publicly known NHL player to be tested for COVID-19 on Monday. Ness’s agent, Neil Sheehy, said the results turned negative after his client followed NHL guidelines to look for tests for flu-like symptoms.

The NBA released a statement on Wednesday saying it would suspend the season until further notice after a Utah Jazz player has tested positive for coronavirus.

“He never thought he would have it initially, to be honest,” said Sheehy. “What happened was that the championship was saying if you have a sore throat, if you have a runny nose, if you have a cough, call the coach and don’t come on the track, and so he did.”

The new NHL directive to allow players to return home has led players and coaches to make plans to travel.

In Buffalo, New York, Sabers striker Marcus Johansson initially hoped to return home to Sweden on a flight from nearby Toronto. These plans changed when Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that the country was closing its borders except for Canadians and Americans, also imposing a 14-day self-quarantine on those entering the country.

Johansson was attempting to book a return flight to New York City.

The organization said Thursday that it is canceling tournaments due to the “evolution of the COVID-19 threat to public health”.

In an email to The AP, NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly said there was little that the league could do with travel restrictions.

“It’s a consequence of where we are. Nobody is to blame,” Daly wrote.

The U.S. government has imposed a travel ban on non-citizens from Europe that runs until mid-April. There are currently 233 European players on the NHL lists, including scorer Leon Draisaitl from Germany, and there are under contract for minors. How many could go home is unknown.

“I’ve talked to some players who are doing their best to climb obviously to return to the safest and most comfortable environment they can reach at this point,” said Grossman.

Map: look at Coronavirus cases around the world

Meanwhile, the American Hockey League has followed NHL in a decision taken on Monday by its executive committee. The 31-team league has announced that the indefinite suspension of its regular season will not be lifted before May and also recommended that its teams work to return the players to their main homes.

Abroad, the Russia-based Kontinental Hockey League paused for a week during its playoffs to determine a new format and schedule for the six remaining teams. The decision came after the Finnish Jokerit and Barys Nur-Sultan, based in Kazakhstan, withdrew from the playoffs amid the pandemic.

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Massachusetts has planned a pandemic for years. Here is what is expected. – NBC Boston

Flatten the curve.

You have probably heard public health officials repeat this phrase as they announce major cancellations and closures related to the new coronavirus pandemic.

So what exactly does that mean? And what can you do to help?

The “curve” refers to exponential growth in new cases that could occur if the virus can spread uncontrollably in the community.

A sharp spike in COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, could bring a stream of new patients, many of whom would need intensive care. Experts say the scenario would have overwhelmed the health system, making it more difficult to make life-saving treatments for all sick people.

The director of the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, dr. Anthony Fauci explains social distancing and how it can help slow the spread of coronavirus in elderly and immunocompromised patients.

That’s why it’s imperative to stop the transmission of the virus and slow it down in the coming weeks, said Dr. Davidson Hamer, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Boston School of Public Health.

Even if the same number of people contract the virus, doctors and nurses will have a greater chance of saving lives if the cases spread over a longer period of time.

“If there is a big wave all at once, then hospitals could run out of beds, run out of negative pressure rooms,” he said. “You know, if there are many patients on fans, potentially even running out of fans.”

State leaders have yet to indicate what could be a spike in COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts. In a press conference last week, Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders said the state is now busy planning scenarios for “what could happen in Massachusetts.”

Governor Charlie Baker has announced that Massachusetts has established a command center for coronavirus response. Recognizing the empty shelves seen around Commonwealth food stores, he told people that there is no need to accumulate food.

The Massachusetts Hospital Association has forwarded NBC10 Boston’s questions to the Department of Public Health, which has not yet responded to requests for information on the state’s hospital capacity.

But previous state projections shed light on how serious a public health emergency in the Bay State can be.

In a 2006 flu pandemic preparedness plan, Massachusetts public health officials predicted that as many as 2 million people would fall ill following the emergence of a new respiratory disease.

Using the modeling developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the state predicted that over 1 million people would have to be treated on an outpatient basis, based on the most likely scenario of how the pandemic would spread across the globe. state. The model predicted that over 80,000 people would have to be treated in a hospital and up to 20,000 could die, in part because the hospital system would be overwhelmed by a flood of cases.

As part of the preparation planning, public health officials in Massachusetts asked hospitals across the state to negotiate agreements to use other large facilities in their region, such as high schools and arsenals, such as so-called “alternative care sites”. The state plans to touch those facilities to treat patients with less severe cases of theoretical disease, allowing hospitals to focus only on the sickest patients.

Importantly, the new coronavirus that now plagues people around the world may not follow the same trajectory as that shown in the state’s projections. These numbers were based on the assumption that 30 percent of the population would contract the virus. This figure may be higher or lower as researchers collect more data on the virus causing COVID-19.

The president and vice president told the public that anyone who wants a test can get one, but dozens of people have contacted NBC10 Boston investigators to say it wasn’t their experience, including a chemotherapy patient.

Massachusetts’ population has also increased since the state made its forecasts, going from about 6.4 million in 2006 to about 6.9 million today.

Emergency measures put in place by Governor Charlie Baker and others could also mitigate the spike in the epidemic, Hamer said, drastically reducing the number of patients who need treatment simultaneously and potentially saving lives.

“If social distancing and personal hygiene and work at home and all these types of strategies don’t work and we have a very large number of cases in a short period of time, I think it could overwhelm the health care system,” he said.

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Local agents donate flowers from the canceled event to the elderly in the midst of the coronavirus crisis – NBC 6 South Florida

A group of South Florida law enforcement officers found a positive assessment
side to the cancellation of their big weekend event – donate flowers to
older people in their community.

Jupiter’s police department had its annual policeman
Ball stopped this weekend as part of an effort by government officials
to stop large gatherings. Instead of throwing away the fresh, official flowers
he went around the city and donated them to assisted housing facilities.

“Everyone was very grateful,” David Schultz of the Jupiter Police Foundation told the NBC affiliate WPTV-TV. “They have been very receptive and appreciate it and it has been a really positive thing for us.”

Over 20 boxes of flowers have been donated
in both private city facilities and across Palm Beach County
like Jupiter Medical Center.

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Baseball player’s first tests are positive for Coronavirus which sent chain effects via MLB – NBC Los Angeles

Maybe it was inevitable.

In the past few days, the world of sports has come to
the scream stops when a handful of players test positive for the COVID-19 virus.
It started with soccer players in Europe and eventually reached the NBA where
three known players have already shown that they are positive for coronavirus. Was
just a matter of time before the virus infiltrated other sports.

On Sunday, he entered the Major League Baseball.

The New York Yankees were the first professional baseball
team to announce that one of their minor league players had tested positive for
COVID-19. The team said the unidentified player was quarantined
Friday after developing a fever.

ESPN’s Jeff Passan was the first to report the news
positive test.

The positive test will certainly have a chain effect in the
MLB world. Probably the whole list of Yankees, both in the major league
and the minor league will need to be tested for the virus.

As of the publication of this story, the team already has
say all of their minor league
players self-quarantine for the next two weeks.

Most likely, the entire spring training facility will
close – if t hasn’t already done so – and a timeline of who entered the unknown
contact with and if he had contact with players from other teams, he will be from
vital.

Last Sunday, MLB sent a reminder to all 30 teams,
encourage all organizations to avoid any activity involving players and
people who gather in significant numbers.

“The risk of contracting a player in a club facility
the virus is real, “read part of the memo.

Initially, after Thursday’s announcement that MLB was
suspend their spring training season and delay the start of the regular
season, the spring training facilities had to remain open to allow players to
continue to train and prepare.

Shortly thereafter, the league announced that the facilities would
would close and the players would have the option of returning home or returning
their home market, or remain in their spring training city (in Arizona or
Florida).

NBC LA spoke to a handful of players on the Los Angeles Dodgers, and many of them were deciding between staying in Arizona or returning to Los Angeles. Many players are renting homes in the Arizona area with rental agreements that expire next week.

Initially, the MLB announced that the regular season would only be delayed “by two weeks”. NBC LA learned that the original interim calendar played a significant role in the players’ decisions on where to stay during the suspension. Many players had the impression that the season could start on April 9th, moving to their home market for the next few weeks the most convenient.

However, following the disease control centers’ announcement on Sunday, all meetings of more than 50 people should be canceled for at least the next eight weeks. The probability of the MLB season starting in April appears to be rather bleak.

In all likelihood, the eight-week barometer is probably longer
accurate, which means that the MLB season could start in late May or early
on June. Many players, including the Dodgers, have to ask themselves, “If
there is no baseball, in which city I would prefer to spend the next two months
in?”

It will be interesting to see if the announcement of the
the first baseball player to be positive has a chain effect on the major league
level and if other positive tests are yet to come.

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Countries close national borders as coronavirus spreads

Countries, including the United States, have introduced more aggressive measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic and combat economic damage, with some increases in border controls and movement restrictions.

As a sign of how the pandemic center of gravity is moving to Europe and the United States, Apple Inc. said it would close all its stores outside of Greater China. Previously closed stores in China were open on Saturday.

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North Dakota Coronavirus News, March 11: Care Facilities Restrict Visitors | Health

Frequently asked questions about the coronavirus

What is coronavirus?

The coronavirus epidemic started in Wuhan, China in late 2019 and spread worldwide. The new virus causes a disease known as COVID-19. The virus is part of a larger coronavirus family, which can lead to diseases ranging from a mild common cold to more severe respiratory diseases such as SARS and MERS.

Who is at risk and what are the symptoms?

Public health experts say the new coronavirus is more contagious than seasonal flu. Most people who get sick have mild symptoms, but some get sick more severely. People who contract the virus can develop pneumonia and some have died. Older people or those who have primary medical problems are more at risk of becoming more seriously ill. Symptoms of the virus include cough, fever and shortness of breath.

What should I do if I develop symptoms?

The North Dakota Department of Health advises people to call their healthcare provider to inform them of recent travel or exhibits and to follow their directions. In the meantime, try to avoid contact with other people.

What can I do to prevent the spread of the virus?

The health department advises people to wash their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer for at least 20 seconds. Sick people should stay home from work or school, both to protect themselves and others they would come in contact with. Avoid touching your face, covering a cough or sneezing with a tissue or elbow, cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces and avoiding contact with people who are sick.

Where can I find more information?

North Dakota Department of Health: www.health.nd.gov/coronavirus

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov

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Nursing homes face unique challenges with Coronavirus – NBC Los Angeles

From Miami to Seattle, nursing homes and other facilities for the elderly host stocks of masks and thermometers, preparing staff shortages and checking visitors to protect a particularly vulnerable population from the coronavirus.

In China, where the epidemic started, the disease was basically deadly for the elderly. In Italy, the epicenter of the virus epidemic in Europe, the more than 100 people who died were elderly, suffering from other complications or both.

Of the 19 deaths in the United States since Saturday, at least 14 had been linked to a nursing home in the Seattle area, along with many other infections among residents, staff and family members. The Seattle Times reported that a second nursing home and a retired community in the area had reported a virus case.

This has alerted other structures in the United States, especially in states with large populations of older residents, such as Florida and California. About 2.5 million people live in long-term care facilities in the United States.

“For people over the age of 80 … the death rate could reach 15%,” said Mark Parkinson, president of the American Health Care Association nursing homes group.

The federal government is now focusing all inspections of nursing homes on infection control, identifying facilities in the city with confirmed cases and those previously mentioned for not following the protocol.

Federal regulations already require homes to have a specialist in preventing infections in staff, and many have already taken measures to deal with seasonal flow and other ailments that pose a greater risk to the elderly.

Even so, the response of structures to coronavirus has varied across the country.

In Florida, where some 160,000 seniors live in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, mandatory screening for visitors is not expected “because we are not at that point,” said Florida Health Care Association spokeswoman Kristen Knapp.

But aged care centers are posting signs that urge visitors to stay away if they have symptoms and are looking for alternative ways to connect to families, such as through video chats, Knapp said.

Concierges in the 14 Florida nursing homes managed by Palm Gardens Corporation are now offering all visitors a short questionnaire asking for information on symptoms, recent trips and contacts with others, said company vice president Luke Neumann.

Neumann said that nursing homes have also purchased additional thermometers in case they have to check visitors’ temperatures and accumulate preventive supplies, including medical masks, protective goggles and clothing. In laundries they make sure to use enough bleach and heat to kill any persistent viral germs, he said.

In the South Shore Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center south of Boston, patient Leo Marchand holds a container of disinfectant wipes on a shelf near the bed that he uses several times a day. The 71-year-old Vietnam veteran and retired truck driver has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which makes it difficult to breathe. The possibility of contracting the coronavirus scares him.

“It’s a concern,” said Marchand. “Really.”

Many facilities across the country have said they have trouble getting masks and medical clothes because of the shortage.

The more intense screening of visitors, meanwhile, isn’t going well with some.

“Some of the visitors have been quite reluctant to comply, and this has been stressful,” said Janet Snipes, executive director of Denver’s Holly Heights nursing center.

Under federal regulations, nursing homes are considered to be a patient’s residence and facilities want to keep them in contact with the family, especially when they are almost dead.

“I don’t think you can completely prevent visitors,” said Dr. David A. Nace, director of long-term care and flu programs at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine. Supervise 300 facilities in Pennsylvania.

For now, facilities in most states are underlining basic precautions, including hand washing and the cough tag.

Centers across the country are also trying to prepare staff for the worst.

An adult daycare center in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami purchased long-lasting ready meals in preparation for possible shortages. The Hebrew Home in Riverdale, New York is running nursing staff through exercises to see how they will handle situations in the 750-bed facility if the virus progresses. Their IT department is building an infrastructure to allow staff to work remotely if they get sick.

“If one of our sites has an outbreak, we will quickly run out of staff in that position,” said Randy Bury, CEO of The Good Samaritan Society, one of the largest nonprofit senior care providers in the country, with 19,000 employees in 24 states.

Some families are considering withdrawing loved ones from the facilities.

Kathleen Churchyard said her family decided to move her 80-year-old mother out of her retirement community near Jacksonville, Florida, and to her sister’s home nearby if the virus is confirmed in the area.

Churchyard, who lives in Concord, North Carolina, fears that her mother won’t take her seriously, and is particularly concerned about her dining room.

“I tried to get her to buy things to prepare … She said, ‘No. If (the virus) catches me, it takes it,'” said Churchyard.

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Associate associate writer Philip Marcelo in Rockland, Massachusetts contributed to this report.

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The Associated Press receives support for health and scientific coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Atomic Veterans of America – NBC Connecticut

The enemy Hank Bolden
faced did not come from a distant front line.

It came from the skies.

It’s a battle that’s still going on 65 years later. Bolden, who is now 82 years old, is an atomic veteran – one of hundreds of thousands of American service members used in human testing by the United States government during post-WWII nuclear tests and sworn to a secret life.

“They wanted to see how the living soldiers would resist the exposure
to radiation, ”recalls Bolden. “Before using live soldiers they were using
mannequins. But you don’t get real results using mannequins as you would
live bodies. “


A DIFFERENT TIME

While accompanying a friend to a New Haven recruiting station in 1953, Bolden was invited to join the army. At just 16 years old then and already out of high school, he admits that he “pulled down” his birth certificate to move to the age of 18, joining the approximately 200,000 underage soldiers who would have served during the Second World War and the eras of the Korean War.

After basic training in
Fort Dix was assigned to work as a tank mechanic in Texas before moving to Texas
California and becoming a surface-to-air missile mechanic.

Despite an executive order issued in July
26, 1948, by President Harry S. Truman to desegregate the armed forces, the last one
the all black units of the army were not abolished until 1954. And in 1955, Bolden
he says, racist attitudes persist even after the units have been racially integrated.

“The residual thoughts of people were firm
linger, “he says.” My outfit was 800 people strong. Thirteen of us were
black. Ten were from the South, who were more tolerant of treatment
they got racially. But the three of us from the North couldn’t tolerate it,
so I have had many fights over this. So I was the guy they wanted
get rid of.”

It would not be the only race
discrimination Bolden would witness as a soldier.


SECRET
ASSIGNMENT

In 1955, the seventeen year old
he was suddenly ordered to the Nevada desert without explanation.

“They don’t tell you what you’re going to face,” he said. “Nobody
they knew what they were going to face. ”

What he would eventually face was a classified operation known as Operation Teapot at the Nevada Test Site. In a series of 14 bomb throws, or “hits”, military officials tried to test the effects of nuclear bombs on structures and strategies, animals and people.

All races of military personnel
participated in the Teapot operation. But upon arrival in Nevada, Bolden was
astounded to accomplish all the other soldiers in his new specially selected unit
for a mysterious assignment they were also black.

“There was this myth about black people
be able to resist, tolerate certain things more than any other race “, he
He says. “So it was a test on that too.”


AN ATOMIC NIGHT

One morning in February, Bolden
the unit was ordered in a desert trench. Unbeknownst to them, it was excavated
the expected route of the fallout, only 2.8 miles away from what it would have become
ground zero for the launch of an atomic bomb.

Even though a countdown sounded on the speakers, Bolden says, the soldiers still had no idea what they were about to face. Without protective gear in addition to the normal fabrics and helmets, they waited and looked.

“They tell you to cover your eyes”
he says.

On February 18, 1955, Shot Wasp, the first nuclear test of Operation Teapot, detonated a Mark 6 nuclear bomb dropped by a B-36 exactly at noon. A monstrous cloud of mushrooms filled the sky, reaching 21,500 feet in height.

“With radiation, when you put your arms over your eyes or hands, you actually see the bones, you see the bones in your body from the exposure. You can see your skeleton. “

After the relapse the warning came.

“You swore not to speak
“said Bolden. The soldiers were threatened with imprisonment and fines for violation
The oath.

For 60 years, Bolden didn’t tell anyone. No this
family, not his wife, not his children. Not even her doctors when she spies on her
tumors have started to show. He developed bladder and posterior subcapsular cancer
cataract and in 1990 multiple myeloma was diagnosed.

“They actually gave me three and a half years
four years to live, ”recalls Bolden.
So in 1995 I should have been a statistic. “

But in 1995, Bolden was in remission. He is a citizen
the secret was coming to light.


HIDDEN STORY

Government figures estimate between 400,000 and 550,000 US military personnel who participated in a series of nuclear tests between 1946 and 1992. According to the Department of Defense’s Defense Threat Reduction Agency, this includes post occupation forces -Second World War of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, prisoners of war in Japan at the end of the Second World War, participants in the atmospheric nuclear tests in Nevada and the Pacific from 1945 to 1962 and participants in the underground nuclear tests in Nevada from 1951 to 1992.

Many of these “atomic veterans” have succumbed before their own
the stories have become public, their bodies are full of tumors. In
1990, the veil of secrecy began to lift.

After setting up the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments to investigate 10-year experiments, President Clinton made a formal apology to American atomic veterans on October 3, 1995. By order of the president, Congress would repeal the nuclear radiation agreement law. and secrecy, allowing atomic veterans to talk about their experiences without fear of fines or treason charges. And financial compensation has been opened to all qualified atomic veterans.

“Those who led the government when these decisions were made are no longer here to take responsibility for what they have done. They are not here to apologize to survivors, family members or their communities whose lives have been overshadowed by shadow of these choices So today, on behalf of another generation of American leaders and another generation of American citizens, the United States of America offers sincere apologies to those of our citizens who have undergone these experiments. the government is wrong, we have a moral responsibility to admit it, “said President Bill Clinton on October 3, 1995

But the television address has been obscured. The same happened
day when OJ Simpson’s verdict was issued in a live classroom feed, taking
on televisions and news cycles across America.

As a result, many skilled veterans had no idea of ​​the ban
the secrecy had been lifted, nor that they could claim benefits. Bolden no
find out until he researched the Internet, he says, in 2015.

“I was once so angry and so aggravating with the government that I thought I would be murdered to keep me from talking,” he says.

When Bolden attempted to apply for subsidies, he found that the burden of proof was placed on his fellow atomic veterans. The government would give compensation from the date a complaint was filed, but not retroactively, and only if the veteran could prove that he had participated in the tests – which proved to be an almost impossible task after millions of military documents were destroyed in a 1973 fire against the National Staff Registration Center. As many as 18 million documents were burned, including 80% of all army personnel discharged between 1912 and 1960.

“They hoped for it
would have died sooner or would have been one of those guys who surrendered ”
says Anthony Bolden, Hank’s son. “No thanks. Hank doesn’t have it.”

After paying her
own pocket for a polygraph lie detector pouch, Hank eventually claimed
approved, setting a precedent for other atomic veterans whose records were
destroyed.

Photo: Hidden story: the atomic veterans of America

Hit a high note

“The love of music has
I’ve always been there. “

After his honorable discharge
from the army, Bolden went to work as an engineer before deciding to pursue a
career as a jazz musician who works while his family grows. Tell the story
while cradling the tenor saxophone that has been at his side since 1967. The “Rolls
Royce “of tools, he says.

The brand is Selmer. IS
in a strange coincidence, the model is a 6 sign. It is the same name as the shot
Wasp atomic bomb design.

But this is where the
the similarities end. The bomb was his nightmare. Music, his dream and his
outlet to work through the trauma of what lived in Nevada
desert.

“It’s like the blood inside
my veins. It takes away all my other thoughts, “he says

Bolden is finally
he receives compensation from the government and is now using it to help make his dream come true.
He returned to school, studying jazz performances at Hartt University of Hartford
School.

“They are like the relic
here with all these kids, you know, “he chuckles.

Professor Javon Jackson
says that the 82-year-old is leaving a unique mark on the prestigious program.

“He has a lot of emotion,” says Jackson. “He is a very bluesy, very full of feeling, a natural player. His life, wisdom and the things he has acquired allow him to play the way it sounds.”

LIVING HISTORY

The vast majority of
Today, the American atomic veterans of the atmospheric test era are gone. About
400,000 veterans were present during these tests, according to the veterans
Administration. Survivors’ numbers vary, from around 10,000 to 80,000
still alive.

Bolden believes he is one of only two surviving African American atomic veterans who are recognized and receive compensation from the government. He is on a mission to reach as many survivors as possible and help them request the long-awaited recognition and compensation.

And he’s sharing his story, he says, to make sure the plight of American atomic veterans is no longer ignored.

“When people like me pass by, this won’t be part of the story unless someone makes sure it’s kept alive.”

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