TikTok sale deadline won’t be extended, says Trump

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Donald Trump has said no further time will be given to ByteDance, the parent company of TikTok, to divest the US business of the video-sharing app.

Donald Trump has declared that no additional time will be given to ByteDance, the parent company of TikTok, to sell the activities in the United States of the video sharing application. / Photo taken on September 9, 2020 / REUTERS / Dado Ruvic

“TikTok will either be sold or closed,” the US president told reporters Thursday night, before a trip to Michigan. “The deadline will not be extended,” he added.

No immediate feedback could be obtained from TikTok.

Donald Trump ordered the Chinese group on August 15 to sell TikTok’s American activities within 90 days because of concerns about the management of private data. This period was initially 45 days.

ByteDance, while engaging in discussions with Microsoft to cede TikTok’s activities in the United States to it, on August 24 attacked Donald Trump in court to contest his ban.

The Chinese group is also in discussions with other potential buyers including Walmart and Oracle, according to sources familiar with the matter.

For the moment, ByteDance has not reached any agreement with these potential buyers as the deadline set by the US administration expires in mid-September.

According to the Bloomberg agency, ByteDance is unlikely to be able to sell TikTok’s U.S. assets by September 20.

Accused by the Trump administration of constituting a threat to the national security of the United States in view of the vast data it collects, ByteDance is seeking to strengthen itself in other countries.

The group plans to invest several billion dollars and recruit hundreds of employees in Singapore over the next three years, Reuters learned Friday from a source familiar with the matter.

Another source said ByteDance transferred engineers from China to Singapore this year.

As part of its global expansion, ByteDance plans to make Singapore the beachhead for its business in Asia, outside of China, according to Bloomberg.

With Aishwarya Nair in Bangalore and Yingzhi Yang in Beijing; French version Claude Chendjou, edited by Blandine Hénault

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Campaign for Mercedes G-Class: Nothing for the faint of heart

Mercedes-Benz launched the G-Class in 1979 – not one of the usual luxury sedans, but a robust off-road vehicle. Their special longevity makes one thing clear: of the almost 400,000 vehicles built since 1979, around 80 percent are still in use on the road.

The car also demands a lot from its drivers – for example opening and closing the trunk door, which weighs more than 80 kilograms. It can be a swinging clap.

The current film, which was made by Antoni and is used globally on various in-house social media platforms, shows that you should be more careful with this in everyday life. The direction was by Dimitri Tsvetkov (production: It’s Us), whose social media format Ost Boys on Youtube more than 800,000 followers excited.

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Facebook Called Will Combine Messenger Service with Instagram DM

INDOZONE.ID – Facebook now has many social media applications such as Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram. Currently his party is trying to integrate all of these applications so that users can know that the application they are using belongs to Facebook.

After previously Facebook has integrated the Messenger Rooms service on Instagram, now it is said that it will combine the Direct Messages (DM) service on Instagram with Facebook’s Messenger service.

Based on reports from The Verge, some of their editors have now got a new update where they find the Instagram DM logo that has changed to the Messenger logo.

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Not Officially Launched, Rp. 1.2 Billion Shophouse Sold Out

JAKARTA, KOMPAS.com – The Covid-19 pandemic has not dampened interest Public in investing property.

Home store ( shop house) Loka 65 developed by Sinarmas Land can be sold out before being officially launched.

Sinarmas Land has only marketed it teaser or marketing through social media and banners.

According to the BSD Commercial CEO Sinar Mas Land Anna Budiman, overall sales ruko Loka 65 as many as 65 units in a short time could not be separated from the concept that was carried, namely hype community complex.

With this concept, the shop Loka 65 is expected to become meeting point or a gathering place youngsters.

Also read: Despite the Sluggish Property Business, BSDE Has Successfully Sold 60 Percent of Tread Houses

Design shop Loka 65 designed minimalist dynamic which is now one design favorit for millennial.

As is known from Facebook Analytic data, potential youth market with ages ranging from 18 years to 30 years in a radius of 1.6 kilometers around the shop houses as many as 74,000 people.

“If you want to find snacks, find them client, make college assignments, hang out with friends, go to salon, or lunch, they can visit Loka 65, “said Anna in a press release, Saturday (15/8/2020).

While. Sinar Mas Land Illustration of a shop house (ruko) Loka 65 developed by Sinar Mas Land.

Ruko Loka 65 is sold starting from Rp. 1.2 billion, covering an area of ​​67.24 square meters which is designed to be suitable as a cafe, salon, cake shop, or any other type of business that the youth market needs.

Also read: With only 5 percent DP, millennials can own a house in TOD City Jababeka

Anna continued, the location of the shop Loka 65 is quite strategic because it is close to various areas.

The shophouse is only a step away from a densely populated residential area, namely the Anggrek Loka cluster.

Then, around the shop there are also various kinds of facilities such as, Eka Hospital, culinary and shopping centers, business areas and offices, as well as access Highway and transportation public.

Consumers can own a unit at Loka 65 by way of payment hard-cash (hard cash), gradual installments to the developer, and Home Ownership Credit (KPR) with a down payment or down payment (DP) of 15 percent which can be repaid 15 times.

Seeing the market interest that still wants to find shop houses with prices ranging from Rp. 1.5 billion, Sinar Mas Land also immediately re-launched a similar shop with a location that is no less attractive in the BSD City area.

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Prince Harry – Begs to stop hatred

Prince Harry (35) and Duchess Meghan (39) has in recent years taken a hard line against what they believe is unfair treatment of themselves – especially to British royalty to be.

Now Prince Harry is urging businesses to demand change from social media players in order to overcome hatred and division online.

In a letter, the prince writes that a better digital experience is crucial for people all over the world who trust the information they receive on social media.

“One could argue that access to accurate information is more important than ever now than at any other time in modern history. Nevertheless, the same places that allow disinformation to spread are those who throw up their hands when asked to take responsibility and find solutions “, he writes in an open letter published in Fast Company, according to People.

CRITICIZED: Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan attended a zoom meeting with young leaders on racism this week. It did not fall into good soil with everyone. Reporter: Emilie Rydning / Red carpet
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– Kindness above all

In the letter, the 35-year-old also encourages companies to crack down on hateful and racist remarks, anti-Semitism, dangerous disinformation and in general a digital culture that promotes violence and greatness.

He also encourages companies to spit in money to bring about change.

“Our hope is that this is the beginning of a movement in which we, as human beings, put community and connection, tolerance and empathy, and joy and kindness above all else,” writes Prince Harry.

He also writes that the internet helps to bring people together, but that it also reinforces and promotes the negative.

“We can – and must – encourage these platforms to redesign themselves in a more responsible and compassionate way. The world will feel it, and we will all benefit from it “, Prince Harry writes in the letter.

GETTING CHEATED: 12 girls are sure that they are dating Prince Harry in the reality show «I Wanna Marry Harry». Video: Fox / Red Carpet
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Won in court

Although Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry have moved to the United States, where they live a far more secluded life with their son Archie (1), it has not exactly been quiet from the duke couple.

They have almost gone to war against the press, and in recent months have been involved in a lawsuit against the Associated Newspaper. More specifically, the legal dispute is that the couple has been subjected to defamation from the tabloid newspaper Mail on Sunday.

However, it has not gone the way of Meghan – until this week. In May, several of the points in the lawsuit were rejected by the judge – in favor of the newspaper.

Last week it became clear that the duke couple lost the first round against the company, and had to thus having to pay the legal costs. This week, however, Meghan won the case.

It is about preventing the newspaper from publishing the names of five of the friends who testify in the case, according to The Guardian. In July, Meghan’s legal team claimed that the Associated Newspaper threatened to publish the names of the five friends.

MEGHAN: The Duchess goes to court to prevent name disclosure. Photo: NTB SCANPIX
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– These five women have not been charged, and neither have I. The publisher of Mail on Sunday is. I therefore respectfully ask that the court treat this case with the sensitivity it deserves, and prevent the publisher of Mail on Sunday from breaking the precedent and abusing the legal process by identifying these anonymous individuals, the Duchess herself said through a witness statement.

The court therefore took this into account.

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Biggest boycott ever against Facebook

While Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced new measures against hate speech and racism on Friday, the third most shared message on the platform was about a defaced monument to fallen soldiers from the Vietnam War. Black Lives Matter protesters are said to have damaged it, the post claimed, and a photo indeed showed thick graffiti letters over the stone-carved names.

Only the photo turned out to be from 2016 and the vandals of that time had no connection whatsoever with the anti-racism movement. The message was eventually removed, but had already been shared by hundreds of thousands of people.

The popularity of it fake newsmessage illustrates the point that civil society organizations and experts made this weekend: Facebook is far from doing enough to counter hate messages and disinformation.

Under pressure from the biggest ad boycott ever against Facebook, Zuckerberg announced new policies on Friday evening. Messages that violate the house rules but are newsworthy will now receive a disclaimer, as competitor Twitter has been doing for some time. The platform also broadens its definition of hate speech, now banning advertisements depicting minority groups as a threat to others. Such claims are allowed in unpaid messages.

Also read: Facebook adjusts policies after ad boycotts

Stop Hate for Profit, the organization behind the boycott, is not impressed. “We have experienced this before with Facebook,” said the organization this weekend. “They said sorry. They took small steps after each catastrophe involving their platform. But this has to end now. ”

Stop Hate for Profit asks advertisers not to advertise on Facebook in July because the company would do too little against hate speech and racist messages. Initially, only relatively small brands joined the promotion, but that changed when British-Dutch Unilever, one of the largest advertisers in the world, announced on Friday to support the promotion. That same evening, Zuckerberg announced the new policy.

Share price plummeted

Since then, other advertising giants, such as Coca-Cola, Levi’s, Starbucks, Honda and telecom company Verizon, have also joined the boycott. After Unilever’s announcement, Facebook’s share price plummeted by 8.3 percent. The ad stop is now supported by more than a hundred companies.

Remarkably, the boycotts of Unilever, Coca-Cola and Starbucks go even further than the call to stop ads on Facebook. The three brands have announced an ad stop on all social media. Their statements show that they see online racism not just as a problem of Facebook, but of all social media companies.


Also read: Warning: this politician is tweeting lies

The boycott is the tentative culmination of months of action against Facebook’s moderation policy. Action groups, concerned users, but also hundreds of Facebook employees, want the platform to act more strictly. A message in which President Trump threatened violence against looters was given a disclaimer by Twitter, but admitted by Facebook – to the ire of Facebook’s critics. The fact that Facebook will now provide a disclaimer to such messages from politicians can be seen as a victory for the critics.

The promotion is reminiscent of the advertiser boycott against YouTube in 2017, when major brands turned against the video platform of Google because it showed their ads with hate videos from IS, among others. YouTube was forced by the boycott to take much stricter action.

Long history

Facebook and other social media companies have a long history of turning a blind eye to racism on their platforms. Dutch moderator Sjarrel de Charon, who worked at Facebook in 2017 and 2018, describes in his book The back of Facebook that swear words like the n-word were allowed for a long time. The n-word is still fully on Facebook. He also saw Sylvana Simons constantly pouring out racist hatred. As a public figure, Simons was less entitled to protection than regular users.

“The approach to racism by Facebook and other platforms is still lackluster,” said researcher Bharath Ganesh, who has spent years researching hate speech and far-right users on social media. Ganesh cites a recent survey by the Tech Transparency Project, which shows that of the 221 white superiority groups identified by NGOs, more than half have a Facebook page or group. He blames Facebook for “lack of commitment”.

“Facebook appears to be reluctant to block radical right-wing groups because it fears being accused of political bias,” said Ganesh.

Still, Facebook can combat hate speech. This was evident earlier this month in the evaluation of the European code of conduct against online hate messages. Social media companies have pledged to assess hate messages reported by European NGOs within 24 hours and, if necessary, to remove them.

What turned out? Facebook and Instagram rated over 90 percent of the 2,348 reported posts within that time in two months. It therefore scored better than any other internet platform.

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Biggest boycott ever against Facebook

While Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced new measures against hate speech and racism on Friday, the third most shared message on the platform was about a defaced monument to fallen soldiers from the Vietnam War. Black Lives Matter protesters are said to have damaged it, the post claimed, and a photo indeed showed thick graffiti letters over the stone-carved names.

Only the photo turned out to be from 2016 and the vandals of that time had no connection whatsoever with the anti-racism movement. The message was eventually removed, but had already been shared by hundreds of thousands of people.

The popularity of it fake newsmessage illustrates the point that civil society organizations and experts made this weekend: Facebook is far from doing enough to counter hate messages and disinformation.

Under pressure from the biggest ad boycott ever against Facebook, Zuckerberg announced new policies on Friday evening. Messages that violate the house rules but are newsworthy will now receive a disclaimer, as competitor Twitter has been doing for some time. The platform also broadens its definition of hate speech, now banning advertisements depicting minority groups as a threat to others. Such claims are allowed in unpaid messages.

Also read: Facebook adjusts policies after ad boycotts

Stop Hate for Profit, the organization behind the boycott, is not impressed. “We have experienced this before with Facebook,” said the organization this weekend. “They said sorry. They took small steps after each catastrophe involving their platform. But this has to end now. ”

Stop Hate for Profit asks advertisers not to advertise on Facebook in July because the company would do too little against hate speech and racist messages. Initially, only relatively small brands joined the promotion, but that changed when British-Dutch Unilever, one of the largest advertisers in the world, announced on Friday to support the promotion. That same evening, Zuckerberg announced the new policy.

Share price plummeted

Since then, other advertising giants, such as Coca-Cola, Levi’s, Starbucks, Honda and telecom company Verizon, have also joined the boycott. After Unilever’s announcement, Facebook’s share price plummeted by 8.3 percent. The ad stop is now supported by more than a hundred companies.

Remarkably, the boycotts of Unilever, Coca-Cola and Starbucks go even further than the call to stop ads on Facebook. The three brands have announced an ad stop on all social media. Their statements show that they see online racism not just as a problem of Facebook, but of all social media companies.


Also read: Warning: this politician is tweeting lies

The boycott is the tentative culmination of months of action against Facebook’s moderation policy. Action groups, concerned users, but also hundreds of Facebook employees, want the platform to act more strictly. A message in which President Trump threatened violence against looters was given a disclaimer by Twitter, but admitted by Facebook – to the ire of Facebook’s critics. The fact that Facebook will now provide a disclaimer to such messages from politicians can be seen as a victory for the critics.

The promotion is reminiscent of the advertiser boycott against YouTube in 2017, when major brands turned against the video platform of Google because it showed their ads with hate videos from IS, among others. YouTube was forced by the boycott to take much stricter action.

Long history

Facebook and other social media companies have a long history of turning a blind eye to racism on their platforms. Dutch moderator Sjarrel de Charon, who worked at Facebook in 2017 and 2018, describes in his book The back of Facebook that swear words like the n-word were allowed for a long time. The n-word is still fully on Facebook. He also saw Sylvana Simons constantly pouring out racist hatred. As a public figure, Simons was less entitled to protection than regular users.

“The approach to racism by Facebook and other platforms is still lackluster,” said researcher Bharath Ganesh, who has spent years researching hate speech and far-right users on social media. Ganesh cites a recent survey by the Tech Transparency Project, which shows that of the 221 white superiority groups identified by NGOs, more than half have a Facebook page or group. He blames Facebook for “lack of commitment”.

“Facebook appears to be reluctant to block radical right-wing groups because it fears being accused of political bias,” said Ganesh.

Still, Facebook can combat hate speech. This was evident earlier this month in the evaluation of the European code of conduct against online hate messages. Social media companies have pledged to assess hate messages reported by European NGOs within 24 hours and, if necessary, to remove them.

What turned out? Facebook and Instagram rated over 90 percent of the 2,348 reported posts within that time in two months. It therefore scored better than any other internet platform.

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Bahraini actress Hanan Reda comments on “The story of the scandalous image” – Erm News





Source: Asma Helmy – Toss News

Bahraini actress Hanan Reda replied to those who accused her of making a fuss because of a “blatant picture”, with the aim of seeking fame by using illegal methods after they were out of the spotlight.

Hanan Reda said in a post through her account in the “Snapchat” application: “Those who revolve humiliation are electronic crimes that revolve after you, and your Lord will give them back to you in your daughters.

She added: “Today is over, and the douches are over. We start a new day. I don’t see, nor a word, nor did anyone who disturbs (disturb) my mood live, so that he continues to joke.

And the Bahraini actress continued: “Shaifa Khair, Ezz, built a family, an origin and a separation … If Abu Deej Al-Sikka Jan had been with her for 6 years, I love you Mama and Papa.”

Hanan Reda caused a stir after a post in which she spoke of a “scandalous” image that she was going to send to her close friends, but she was mistakenly posted to the public and some followers saw her forcing her to apologize.

The audience interacted with the post that sparked their curiosity and started searching for the image, so everyone was surprised that there was no picture and no one circulated it or monitored it, which doubts the truth of the matter and raised the accusations against it.

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Egyptian belly dancer gets three years in prison for ‘licentiousness’ NOW

Sama El Masry, a belly dancer popular in Egypt, was sentenced on Saturday to three years’ imprisonment and a fine of more than EUR 16,500 for inciting “debauchery” and “immorality” on social media.

El Masry posted images to the social media TikTok that the prosecution described as “sexually suggestive.” According to the judge, the 42-year-old artist violated “family values”.

“There is a huge difference between freedom and debauchery,” said John Talaat, an MP who called for prosecution of El Masry for her posts.

The belly dancer denies the allegations and appeals the ruling. The artist says it concerns stolen images that were shared with her phone without her permission.

Several female influencers on TikTok and Instagram have been arrested in Egypt in recent months following similar allegations. The same sentence awaits them, according to MP Talaat.

Law gives the right to censor the internet

Egypt passed a law in 2018 that gives the government the full right to censor the internet and monitor all communications. Violations carry a prison sentence of at least two years and a maximum fine of more than EUR 16,500.

The law has so far only been used to prosecute women, says lawyer Entessar El Saeed of the Cairo Center for Development and Law.

“Our conservative society is struggling with technological change, which offers people a completely new way of thinking,” said the lawyer.

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